BU.001.351.  Professional Development for Career Success.  

This experiential course is designed to help first-year GMBA students develop the skills needed to accomplish their personal and professional goals. Active participation is essential so that students develop these skills in sequence and receive feedback from instructors and peers. Students are expected to interact and engage with career coaches, external speakers, alumni, and employers throughout the course.

BU.001.600.  Graduate Internship Project.  

Internship projects are available for students needing transcript documentation of an approved Carey Business School Internship. The Internship Project course is an audit only, no credit course offered during each semester. Carey Business School students must be enrolled in a degree program at least one semester (9 credits) before seeking an internship. Students should apply and register for the internship project course at least two weeks before the internship begins. (0 credit)

BU.910.610.  Accounting Foundations.  2 Credits.  

This course emphasizes the vocabulary, methods, and processes by which for-profit business transactions are communicated. Topics include the accounting cycle; basic business transactions involving assets, liabilities, equity, revenues, and expenses; and preparation and understanding of financial statements, including balance sheets, statements of income, and cash flows. The course also introduces the analysis of financial results and basic managerial accounting concepts and tools. This course prepares students for topics including capital budgeting, valuation and more advanced financial statement analysis courses.

BU.910.611.  Corporate Finance.  2 Credits.  

This course studies corporate finance and capital markets, emphasizing the financial aspects of managerial decisions. The course touches on the major areas of finance, including the valuation of real and financial assets, risk and return, the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), optimal portfolio choice, estimating the cost of capital, capital structure, capital budgeting, the effects of leverage, and financial distress.

BU.911.610.  Marketing Management.  2 Credits.  

This course covers principles of market-driven managerial decision making that determine competitiveness in dynamic consumer and organizational markets. Particular areas of emphasis include industry analyses, dynamics of competition, market segmentation, target marketing, channels of distribution, and product and pricing decisions. In-depth analytical skills are developed through case analyses, class discussions, and applied projects.

BU.912.610.  Competitive Strategy.  2 Credits.  

This course requires students to assume the role of a general manager. General managers have to cope with tremendous complexity, uncertainty, and inadequate information. An important requirement of a general manager's job is the ability to think in a cross-functional and holistic manner. Creativity and innovation are critical to achieving success, and so is the ability to execute and manage day to day. The concepts and frameworks to be covered in this course include Porter’s 5-forces Analysis, PEST Analysis, SWOT, emergent versus deliberate strategy, Resource-Based View of the Firm, Core Competencies and Dynamic Capabilities, Cost Leadership Strategies, Differentiation Strategies, Vertical Integration, Diversification, Cost Accounting, Business Process Management, Inventory Management, Newsvendor Problem, Value Chain Analysis, Activity-Based Accounting, and more.

Prerequisite(s): BU.930.633

BU.912.611.  Operations Management.  2 Credits.  

Within a manufacturing or service organization, operations management’s role is to orchestrate technology and resources in creating products and services to meet the needs of end consumers. Operations management, accordingly, consists of ideas for shaping and innovating an organization’s business model. This course provides a conceptual and actionable introduction to operations management and covers a ?wide? range of topics,? including operations strategy, process ?mapping and ?design, queuing theory, inventory management, lean manufacturing, and revenue management?, unified by a thought framework known as "the operations prism"? (flows, variability, and buffers).?? ?By ?taking ?a process view of value-added functions that lead to an understanding of how to make ?operations ?design choices,? ??students will acquire analytical and strategic thinking skills crucial for ?managing? 21st-century ?operations.

BU.913.610.  Business Analytics.  2 Credits.  

This course lays the analytical foundation for modeling that supports many managerial decisions that entail tradeoffs among competing objectives. Building on concepts from Operations Research, Economics and Probability Theory, this course provides a basic introduction to a variety of resource allocation problems.

Prerequisite(s): BU.520.601

BU.913.611.  Judgement and Decision Making.  2 Credits.  

The purpose of this course is to improve students’ leadership capabilities through a critical examination of the organizational and psychological forces that guide human decision-making. Grounded in behavioral science and geared toward an understanding of decision-makers within organizations, topics in this course include heuristics and biases, Bayesian updating (taught with a behavioral lens), prediction accuracy, social and motivational influences on decisions, trust decisions, and expert intuition. The course culminates in a final project geared toward improving managers’ judgment and decision-making.

BU.914.610.  Business Statistics.  2 Credits.  

Students learn statistical techniques for further study in business, economics, and finance. The course covers descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous random variables, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression analysis. The course emphasizes statistics to solve management problems.

BU.920.601.  Business Communication.  2 Credits.  

Effective leaders are also skillful communicators. To succeed as a leader, you not only must drive individual and team performance, but also inspire diverse stakeholders to trust you and believe in you. Developing and implementing the right strategy is only part of the job; you also must convince colleagues and clients that you are ready to lead.

BU.920.602.  Accounting Foundations.  2 Credits.  

Business leaders must be conversant in accounting, the language of business. This course equips future business leaders with essential understanding of financial and managerial accounting and the ability to interpret financial status and make effective managerial decisions by using accounting numbers. The covered topics include fundamentals of financial statements, evaluation of financial positions and risks, managerial accounting concepts, and capital budgeting techniques.

BU.920.603.  Microeconomics and Market Design.  2 Credits.  

This course develops the students’ ability to apply fundamental microeconomics concepts and tools to decision making by consumers and firms, and to understand economic exchanges and markets. The first half of the course covers consumer choice and market demand, production costs and firms’ profit maximization, market competition and equilibrium, market power and the implications of different market structures for output and pricing decisions. The second half is devoted to understanding the principles and design of practical market mechanisms; topics include game theory, auctions, matching algorithms, and market “platforms”.

BU.920.604.  Finance.  2 Credits.  

This course covers central issues in financial management and corporate finance. Students will learn how financial managers make investment, financing and other decisions and the tools they use to reach such decisions. Topics covered include time value of money, risk, valuation, capital structure, capital budgeting, and mean-variance portfolio selection. The course provides the analytical tools and the financial theories needed to implement sound financial decisions within a corporation (and outside of a corporation). Ideas are presented in a cohesive way within the framework of the no-arbitrage principle, the fundamental principle shaping all aspects of modern finance. Command of the subject is crucially important for anyone considering a career not only in investment banking, investment management or trading, but also in general management, corporate strategy, management consulting, entrepreneurship, and the non-profit world.

BU.920.605.  Marketing Management.  2 Credits.  

New digital technology has enabled consumers to take more control of their lives. Wearable devices, smartphone apps, etc., provide consumers with new tools to connect with friends, expand their network, obtain information to improve their buying decisions, change bad habits, monitor health indexes, manage mental health, etc. Individual decisions are often influenced by others.In this course, we learn what drives consumers’ needs and their choices, with special reference to the new tech environment. Making use of these insights and taking into account a company’s constraints and the competitive environment (i.e., competitors’ product portfolio, their constraints, etc.), we study how firms can come up with new products/services or modify their existing portfolios to serve unmet needs. The customer insights also allows us to achieve more efficient segmentation, targeting and positioning (STP), and design more powerful tactical tools like pricing, distribution, advertising, and marketing communication (commonly referred to as the 4Ps) to help reach targeted consumers and improve their adoption and loyalty, with the goal of providing superior customer value to the consumers.Marketing is a multidisciplinary area that makes use of economics, psychology, sociology, experiments, field data, statistics, and econometrics to understand how individuals make their decisions. A unique aspect of this course is to study how the internet has empowered peer effects via social networks and two-sided market platforms, and how companies should take advantage of these new tools in managing customers and developing their businesses.

BU.920.606.  Operations Management.  2 Credits.  

Operations Management seeks to match supply with demand in a marketplace: On the supply side, it generates value by orchestrating technologies, resources, and processes needed for creating products and services; on the demand side, it captures value by fulfilling the promises of revenue models with the right balance of various competing objectives. This course provides an actionable overview of Operations Management, emphasizing both quantitative models and qualitative strategies needed for shaping and innovating service and manufacturing organizations’ business models. We will apply a diverse set of marketplace analytics tools (e.g., flow analysis, process redesign, queueing theory, inventory control, lean, and data analytics) to a variety of operational scenarios, from automobile factories to healthcare organizations, from brick-and-mortar stores to e-retailing, and from airlines to online platforms, centering around a coherent framework known as “the operations prism” ? (flows, variability, and buffers). Through this course, students are also expected to gain a perspective on the role of artificial intelligence in managing 21st-century operations.

BU.920.607.  Competitive Strategy.  2 Credits.  

This module requires students to assume the role of a general manager in the 2020’s and beyond. General managers have to cope with tremendous complexity, uncertainty, and inadequate information. An important requirement of a general manager's job is the ability to think in a cross-functional and holistic manner. Since the beginning of the new millennium, technology progress has been accelerated. The internet, mobile devices, and the abundance of personal data available to companies reshaped the competitive landscape and new business models emerged. As technology does not show any sign of slowing down, creativity and innovation are more critical than ever to achieve success, as is the ability to digest and apply tremendous amounts of cutting-edge research quickly. The concepts and frameworks to be covered in this course range from the, now classic, Porter’s 5-forces Analysis, through well understood framework of vertical and horizontal integration, and to cutting edge theories of two-sided markets, network effects, and advertisement-driven, transaction-driven, and data-monetization-driven businesses.

BU.920.621.  Data Science: Statistics.  2 Credits.  

Students learn statistical techniques for further study in business, economics, and finance. The course covers descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous random variables, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variance. The course emphasizes statistics to solve management problems. Case studies, spreadsheets, and computer software are used.

BU.920.622.  Data Science: Econometrics for Market Analysis.  2 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): BU.920.621

BU.920.623.  Data Science: Big Data Consulting Project.  2 Credits.  

Big Data Consulting Project is the first in a sequence of experiential courses for full-time MBA students. The course features a partnering organization (client), which provides a large dataset accompanied with inquiries. Students work in teams, to answer the client’s inquiries using a combination of descriptive and predictive analytics. To this end, students may use a combination of data visualization tools and programming languages for data analysis (such as Tableau and R). The students will be introduced to these techniques and tools in the lecture component of the course as well as in earlier courses such as the Bootcamp: Immersion in Technology, Data Science: Statistics, and Data Science: Econometrics for Market Analysis. In this first course of the experiential sequence, the students will adopt several planning and feedback tools that will help them work as a team.

BU.920.631.  Behavioral Science: Leadership and Organizational Behavior.  2 Credits.  

The purpose of this course, required for students in the full-time MBA program at the Carey Business School, is to introduce students to fundamental topics related to managing, leading, and working in modern organizations. The course exposes students to a broad array of frameworks for understanding individual, team, and organizational behavior, with particular emphasis on the design of work, interpersonal dynamics, organizational innovation and change, global work environments, and crafting meaningful careers. This breadth of topics, ranging across organizational levels and career stages, distinguishes the course and is meant to complement students’ later coursework focused on individual decision-making, solving problems in teams, and avoiding pitfalls of early career managers.

BU.920.632.  Behavioral Science: Design Thinking.  1 Credit.  

During this course, students will learn about and participate in Design Thinking: a human-centered problem-solving approach utilized by some of the most creative and competitive business organizations globally. With emphases on research, ideation, iteration, prototyping, and multidisciplinary teams, Design Thinking helps practitioners leverage their creativity to achieve novel solutions. This two-day intensive course will center on experiential learning, with students working together in teams to solve a complex problem using Design Thinking.

BU.920.711.  Foundations of Business Analytics.  2 Credits.  

Being a leader in a data driven world requires the knowledge of both data-related (statistical) methods and of appropriate models to use that data. The Business Analytics class focuses on the latter: it introduces students to analytical frameworks used for decision making. These include Linear and Integer Optimization, Decision Analysis, Risk modeling, and Monte Carlo Simulation. For each methodology students are first exposed to the basic mechanics, and then apply the methodology to real-world business problems using software. Emphasis will be not on programming, but rather on formulating problems, translating those formulations into useful models, optimizing and/or displaying the models, and interpreting results.The course will not produce experts at modeling and/or programming (although students may be able to pick up a few spreadsheet skills along the way). Rather, the goal is to prepare managers who are comfortable with translating trade-offs into models, understanding the output of the software, and who are appreciative of quantitative approaches to decision making.

Prerequisite(s): BU.920.621

BU.920.721.  Foundations of Business of Health.  2 Credits.  

This course provides an overview of the evolution, structure and current issues in the health care system. It examines the unique features of health care as a product, and the changing relationships between patients, physicians, hospitals, insurers, employers, communities, and government. The course examines three broad segments of the health care industry: payors, providers and suppliers. Within the payor segment, the course examines the sources and destinations of spending, managing care, insurance design, payment models, strategy, and efforts to address payer gaps including insufficient access and social determinants of health. Within the provider segment, the course examines the impact of cost containment, payment reform, and competition on the structure, innovation, care quality, and efficiency of hospitals, physicians, and integrated delivery systems. Within the supplier segment, the course will examine developments in the biotechnology, pharmaceutical, medical devices, genomics, connected health and IT industries.

BU.920.722.  Business Law, Health Law, and Regulations.  2 Credits.  

This course provides students with an overview of the legal and regulatory environment as it affects health care and business. With the increasing intersection between health care delivery and law, this course introduces students to the legal and regulatory issues they are likely to face in managing health care organizations. Using cutting-edge cases, students will explore medical malpractice, negligence, liability (physician, product, and corporate), criminal aspects of health care, patient consent and rights, and health care reform. In today’s economy, a thorough working knowledge of the legal and regulatory environment in which businesses operate is essential for well-prepared business executives. This course provides an overview of the legal and regulatory frameworks affecting business in the United States. Topics include forms of business organization, contracts, torts and product liability, intellectual property, constitutional law business transactions, and discrimination and employment issues.

Prerequisite(s): BU.920.721

BU.920.816.  Innovation Field Project.  4 Credits.  

The Innovation Field Project is the second experiential course in the full-time MBA program. Students work in teams to define, and scope problems posed by partner organizations, and deliver innovative solutions using evidence-based approaches. Students use the concepts and tools studied in their first year – such as research methods, data analytics, creative problem-solving techniques, and discipline-specific knowledge – to analyze the business issue at hand and provide innovative, actionable recommendations to the project partners. The business problem might relate to a wide range of issues, including process or service design, strategy development, financial risk management, or marketing. Projects might also encompass large scale thematic issues facing contemporary organizations, such as the ethical dilemmas that leaders face. Projects can be in any sector including tech, retail, banking, health or manufacturing. HTI focused projects may include physician group practices, hospitals, pharmaceutical firms, public health organizations and biotechnology firms.

BU.930.610.  Effective Communication.  1 Credit.  

This course prepares Innovation for Humanity (I4H) teams to communicate effectively with internal and external audiences. Students refine their skills by analyzing and practicing research-based strategies adopted by successful business professionals. In particular, students learn how to write compelling memos, develop executive presence, and deliver informative presentations.

BU.930.630.  Solving Organizational Problems.  2 Credits.  

This course aims to equip GMBA Innovation for Humanity (I4H) teams with the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to thrive in their I4H projects and future organizational problem-solving endeavors. It differs from other management courses in its focus on the specific challenges faced by problem-solving teams (e.g., I4H teams) versus teams or individuals in other organizational settings (e.g., decision-making situations, organizational change efforts). It includes units intended to help students set up a problem-solving team for success, follow the iterative problem-solving process, adapt that process to manage scope and ambiguity, and both collect and evaluate the quality of problem-relevant evidence. Students will leave with foundational abilities needed to solve organizational problems.

BU.930.631.  Experiences in Leadership.  

The goal of this course is to help students translate research about individuals and groups into capabilities to become effective leaders. The course will provide students with analytical frameworks that will help them understand behavior in organizations, along with the practical experience to put that understanding into action. Key to developing this experience is using the classroom as a forum to apply knowledge and develop skills through immersive exercises, cases and interaction with practitioner experts.

BU.930.632.  Management and Organizational Behavior.  2 Credits.  

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to fundamental topics related to managing, leading, and working in modern organizations. The course exposes students to a broad array of frameworks for understanding individual, team, and organizational behavior, with particular emphasis on the design of work, interpersonal dynamics, organizational innovation and change, global work environments, and crafting meaningful careers. This breadth of topics, ranging across organizational levels and career stages, distinguishes the course and is meant to complement students’ later coursework focused on individual decision-making, solving problems in teams, and avoiding pitfalls of early career managers.

BU.930.633.  Business Microeconomics.  2 Credits.  

This is a foundational microeconomics course with emphasis on the application of economic principles and methodologies to private and managerial decision problems. Major topics include consumer choice and market demand, costs and profit maximization, market structures (competition, monopoly, and oligopoly), short- and long-run output/price decisions, and strategic interactions (game theory).

BU.930.634.  Financial Valuation.  2 Credits.  

This course provides comprehensive methods for valuing securities, projects, assets and firms. Notions and methods from corporate finance, corporate strategy, investments and financial statement analysis are employed extensively.

BU.932.610.  Ethical Leadership.  2 Credits.  

In this course, students will be challenged to think critically about the ethics of organizational life. What is an organization’s or leader’s ethical obligation to the people they serve? How can ethics and pragmatism in business co-exist? And, why do individuals within organizations fall prey to unethical behavior? With cases and empirical research as a backdrop, this highly interactive seminar will challenge students to examine these and other fundamental questions, in an effort to cultivate the skills and dispositions that are required of an effective leader.

BU.940.610.  Innovation for Humanity Project: Country Group.  

This experiential learning course is designed to develop agile and creative business leaders who understand how to build sustainable, impactful businesses within developing communities around the world. The course is consistent with the Carey Business School’s signature theme of “teaching business with humanity in mind” and it provides an understanding of the needs of developing communities around the world. Students will work domestically and abroad engaging with entrepreneurs, public officials, faculty and NGOs, exploring critical development issues. The students will learn to understand the complex systems that prevail in the emerging economies, the role of appropriate technologies and interventions in solving pressing problems, and to recognize the sustainable business opportunities embedded in these community needs.

BU.940.611.  Innovation for Humanity.  4 Credits.  

This experiential learning course is designed to develop agile and creative business leaders who understand how to build sustainable, impactful businesses within developing communities around the world. The course is consistent with the Carey Business School’s signature theme of “teaching business with humanity in mind” and it provides an understanding of the needs of developing communities around the world. Students will work domestically and abroad engaging with entrepreneurs, public officials, faculty and NGOs, exploring critical development issues. The students will learn to understand the complex systems that prevail in the emerging economies, the role of appropriate technologies and interventions in solving pressing problems, and to recognize the sustainable business opportunities embedded in these community needs.