BU.001.510.  Career and Life Design for Experienced Professionals.  

Career and Life Design for Experienced Professionals provides you with an opportunity to learn and develop the necessary skills to engage in career and life design. From exploring opportunities to switch or advance within your career and strategically updating your resume, to interviewing and job search strategies, this mixed synchronous/asynchronous eight-week course will help you understand, tell, and live your career story.

BU.001.520.  Professional Development for Career Success.  

Professional Development for Career Success provides you with an opportunity to learn and develop the necessary skills to engage in career planning. From clarifying your values and interests, exploring opportunities, and learning about professional branding, to interviewing and job search strategies, this hands-on and exploratory eight-week course will help you understand, tell, and live your career story.

BU.001.611.  Business English for Graduates I.  

This course is designed to polish students’ communicative competence for academic and professional success through analysis of texts, discussion, in-class writing, group work, and reflection activities. This course is the prerequisite for Business English for Graduates II. It meets for 3 hours a week for eight weeks.

BU.001.612.  Business English for Graduates II.  

This course is a continuation of Business English for Graduates I. This course is designed to polish students’ communicative competence for academic and professional success through analysis of texts, discussion, in-class writing, group work, and reflection activities. It meets for 3 hours a week for eight weeks.

BU.001.614.  Business English for Graduates III.  

This course is a continuation of Business English for Graduates II. This course is designed to polish students’ communicative competence for academic and professional success through analysis of texts, discussion, in-class writing, group work, and reflection activities. It meets for 3 hours a week for eight weeks.

BU.001.615.  Business English for Graduates IV.  

This course is the continuation of Business English for Graduates III. This course is designed to polish students’ communicative competence for academic and professional success through analysis of texts, discussion, in-class writing, group work, and reflection activities. It meets for 3 hours a week for eight weeks.

BU.001.620.  Summer Intensive.  

The Summer Intensive aims to prepare international students entering the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School full-time graduate programs for the academic rigors of one of the world’s premier universities. The program focuses on helping participants adjust to American life and culture. Daily practice in writing and speaking English in a variety of contexts helps students prepare for the logistical, academic, professional, and social challenges they will face. Through close reading of articles and case studies, they learn and apply essential business concepts and terminology from such core disciplines as economics, accounting, organizational behavior, and marketing. In addition, participants are introduced to resources and strategies to cope with the logistics of living in a foreign country, from housing and transportation to grocery shopping and navigating a telephone book. One function of such a carefully orchestrated transition is to reduce the anxiety and stress usually associated with the start of classes.

BU.001.700.  Independent Graduate Project.  1 Credit.  

An independent study provides an opportunity for students to study a particular topic of interest in depth. Students who demonstrated competency in a certain area may elect to pursue an independent study project under the supervision of a faculty sponsor with expertise in the selected area.

BU.003.893.  Leadership Development Expedition.  2 Credits.  

This course is a leadership-intensive seminar and expedition focused on helping students develop their own leadership capacity, while also emphasizing a conceptual understanding of leadership in diverse settings. The course utilizes the unique opportunity for leadership development embedded in outdoor experiential education, providing students the challenge of serving as a leader. The course combines a thorough academic introduction to leadership development and opportunity for self-assessment with repeated reflection and feedback to help students develop their own path as leaders.<br><br>This is a physically demanding course. Students should be in moderate physical condition. However, no technical outdoor skill or experience required - this is beginner friendly.<br><br>Expedition destination, activities, physical demands, fees, and eligibility requirements vary.

BU.003.903.  Global Immersion:Finance in Europe.  2 Credits.  

This course is offered to Carey Business School students interested in learning more about European financial markets. The course takes place in Frankfurt, Germany, and London, England. It aims to develop in-depth knowledge of the European financial system through a partnership with the Frankfurt School of Finance and Management (FSFM). Both Carey Business school faculty and FSFM professors will provide classes on the history and current status of the financial system in Europe and compare those systems to the US financial landscape. Corporate and government organization visits will complement lectures and case studies.

BU.141.710.  Effective Teaming.  2 Credits.  

In today’s businesses, teams are a basic organizational building block. Teaming is perennially listed as one of the top skills that recruiters look for in graduating MBAs. This course conveys knowledge and practical tools that help students become more productive team members and leaders. Topics include the characteristics of high performing teams, leadership strategies for creating performing teams, strategies for avoiding dysfunctional team dynamics, and best practices for managing diverse and virtual teams.

BU.142.720.  Managing in a Diverse & Global World.  2 Credits.  

Business organizations and other critical organizations operate in both a market and nonmarket environment. A major focus of the course is examining contextually global diversity, inclusion, and multicultural issues through the lens of multiple dimensions. Successful, globally minded managers align the firm’s capabilities with the demands of both its market and nonmarket environment. This course examines political, regulatory and societal factors of influence. Students learn to analyze the motives for focused intervention to better judge when and how political developments may affect business or organization interest. It explores the rise of “private politics” (activists, civil society networks, and NGOs), which are increasingly complementing conventional “public politics.” This new plurality also opens exciting new nonmarket strategic opportunities for profit and socially driven business, providing it with new potential allies. This course stresses collective moral agency and the ethical dimensions of business and management in such a global political economy. Students explore cross-cultural perspectives on economics and business culture, and how to analyze and proactively manage the nonmarket environment through integrated market and nonmarket strategies. Cumulatively through class interaction and team activities students develop strategies for managing aspects of global diversity and inclusion within the context of a real organization opportunity.

BU.150.710.  Discovery to Market I.  2 Credits.  

This course teaches the process of bringing scientific discoveries to market. Students learn about innovation and invention processes, how to identify opportunities and assess when ideas are inventions, the steps required to bring the product to market, including intellectual property protection and regulatory processes, and strategies to license early stage inventions to third parties for further development. Students work in small teams on early-stage invention projects that are patented or patent pending sourced by the instructor from university and government technology transfer offices. Students will analyze the feasibility of commercializing the invention so that it can be licensed to a third party that can pursue entrepreneurial funding and development.

BU.150.715.  Discovery to Market II.  2 Credits.  

This course is the second part of a two part course. This course teaches the process of bringing scientific discoveries to market. Students learn about innovation and invention processes, how to identify opportunities and assess when ideas are inventions, the steps required to bring the product to market, including intellectual property protection and regulatory processes, and strategies to license early stage inventions to third parties for further development. Students work in small teams on early-stage invention projects that are patented or patent pending sourced by the instructor from university and government technology transfer offices. Students will analyze the feasibility of commercializing the invention so that it can be licensed to a third party that can pursue entrepreneurial funding and development.

Prerequisite(s): BU.150.710

BU.151.720.  Corporate Strategy.  2 Credits.  

This course is concerned with the formulation and analysis of corporate strategy. Corporate strategy asks the question, ‘In what industries should a firm compete?’ These are the objectives and policies that collectively determine how a business positions itself to increase its returns and create economic value for its owners and stakeholders. In this course, students learn analytical techniques for diagnosing the industrial landscape of a business, a firm’s overall portfolio, and identifying and analyzing specific business options. These concepts and frameworks will help you to learn to put structure on complex and unstructured problems in corporate strategy to provide a solid foundation for managerial decision making.

BU.151.770.  Power and Politics.  2 Credits.  

The purpose of this course is to immerse you in issues and dynamics related to power and politics in organizations. We seek to make power and politics discussable, recognizable, and usable. In other words, this course is designed to fuel learning of concepts that are useful for understanding, analyzing, and harnessing power and political processes. But beyond discovering ways to extend your own power, influence, and political skill, we will also uncover lessons about ways in which power and politics can blind and deceive you, and how you might better navigate situations in which you are up against relatively more powerful people or forces. We will use a range of learning methods including theoretical and business articles, cases, exercises, assessments, and simulations. We will cover a variety of topics ranging from political skills, bases of power and influence, dangers of power, power and change, and leading with power.

BU.152.710.  Entrepreneurial Ventures.  2 Credits.  

This course focuses on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that enable entrepreneurs to pursue opportunities in business development. Students form teams to experience each step of the entrepreneurial process. The end result is an opportunity assessment of a business idea. Emphasis is placed on a hands-on approach with learning supplemented by cases appropriate to each phase of the course. Students are exposed to real entrepreneurial operations and businesses, via final project and presentations.<br/>Before registering, please note that this course is graded on a team-based term project involving field work. You should be prepared to spend 15 hours per week, in addition to the time for readings, quizzes and case studies. If you anticipate heavy travel, work or family commitments, please consider registering at a future semester.

Prerequisite(s): BU.210.620[C] AND BU.410.620[C]

BU.152.735.  Strategy Consulting Practicum.  2 Credits.  

This course is concerned with the formulation and analysis and practical application of business strategy. Business strategy is the set of objectives and policies that collectively determine how a business creates value for stakeholders. Strategy is concerned with answering two central questions: "What businesses should we participate in?" and "How should we compete?" Students will learn analytical techniques for diagnosing the competitive position of a business, evaluate strategies, and identify and analyze strategic options.Students integrate and apply previous course work to strategic challenges addressed by organizational leaders. Analytic, integrative, and decision-making skills are also developed as student teams confront these strategic challenges. Creativity and innovation are critical to achieve success; as to follow often-traveled strategic paths is unlikely to result in superior performance. Students are challenged to use both critical and creative thinking as they perform analyses and provide strategic recommendations to their clients.

BU.152.740.  CityLab Toolkit: Business Innovation for Social Impact.  2 Credits.  

For the first time in history, humans are an urban species; the livability of cities now determines the future of humanity and the planet. CityLab is an urban innovation platform engaging students in a global experiment of reinventing cities by revitalizing urban neighborhoods from within. The CityLab Toolkit immerses you in the concrete context of people and places dealing with the disruptive uncertainty and frustration of livability challenges that threaten the environment, human health, social cohesion, civic order, and prosperity of cities. It introduces strategies, tools, and practices for tackling these challenges as opportunities to co-create value for the flourishing of humanity and the planet. This course is a hands-on, active learning experience requiring a high degree of individual commitment, initiative, self-discipline, adaptability, and collaboration. PREREQUISITES: This course is open to graduate students throughout the University who have completed at least four courses of their graduate program prior to enrolling.

BU.152.745.  City Lab Practicum: Social Impact Project.  2 Credits.  

The CityLab Practicum puts the CityLab Toolkit knowledge and skills to work on a social impact project sponsored by a neighborhood entrepreneur, business, or organization. The Practicum is an opportunity to solidify your skills, demonstrate your expertise, deepen your network, and position yourself as an innovative social impact leader. This course is a hands-on, active learning experience requiring a high degree of individual commitment, initiative, self-discipline, adaptability, and collaboration.

Prerequisite(s): BU.152.740

BU.450.630.  Designing Experiments.  2 Credits.  

Did a new compensation scheme motivate employees to work harder or stay with the organization longer? Do larger subsidies for health insurance lead to improved employee health and productivity? Did a new website format increase user activity on the site? Did a charitable organization’s program to train community leaders lead to positive changes in the community? Cause and effect questions like these are crucial to developing evidence-based practice in business, nonprofits and governments. Yet answering these questions is difficult when new ideas are not implemented with the explicit intent of measuring their impacts. In other words, developing evidence requires a scientific approach to business and policy.<br></br>This class aims to teach students to develop empirical evidence about the best ways to achieve their aims, whether these aims are to increase profits or to address social problems. The use of randomized controlled trials to test program impacts is becoming increasingly popular in businesses and government. An employee estimated that the average Facebook user is a participant in about 10 randomized controlled trials at any point in time. The U.S. government recently created a “Nudge Squad” that works with federal agencies to test new ideas through randomized controlled field trials. Experiments are an integral part of the ‘big data’ revolution going on in business, nonprofits and government. Importantly, they do not require advanced statistics or powerful computers to implement and interpret. <br></br>The course will blend lectures, group discussions, readings, homework, a group project, and guest speakers from private industry, nonprofits and government agencies. I am a firm believer that the most fundamental principles can be stated in plain English. Thus the course stresses intuition (in English) over math and mechanics. Nevertheless, there will be math and mechanics in the course.

Prerequisite(s): BU.510.601 OR BU.914.610

BU.510.001.  Statistical Analysis Waiver Exam.  

This exam affords students the opportunity to confirm proficiency in Statistical Analysis. Students who successfully complete the waiver exam will be granted a waiver with replacement for BU.510.601. Please note: Waiver exams may only be taken once per student, in the first or second semester of registration in a new program. The exam will be completed online in Blackboard within the timeframe stipulated listed within this course description. Students will be required to use Remote Proctor for the actual completion of the exam.

BU.520.701.  Enterprise Risk Management Frameworks.  2 Credits.  

This course provides an introduction to the formal principles and practices of modern COSO- and ISO-style enterprise risk management (ERM). The course provides a framework that integrates the core, foundational, and elective courses in the school’s Enterprise Risk Management Curriculum. A combination of didactic lectures, group conversation, and student presentations will be used to impart the material and bring it alive.

BU.520.710.  Big Data Machine Learning.  2 Credits.  

This course provides students with a firm understanding of the mathematical and statistical theories that underlie the foundations of big data and machine learning. Students will be engaged in solving real-world problems by directly applying their data science skills through the implementation of code and rigorous analysis of financial data sets. In particular, this course will highlighted some of the challenges and limitations of applying such machine learning algorithms. Focus will be on understanding the subtle differences in each technique. This course will be hands-on with weekly homework assignments and a final presentation geared towards fully immersing students in the data science process. Students will program in Python (e.g. Pandas, NumPy, Scikit-Learn, Matplotlib, pattern, NLTK, etc). Topics that will be covered include: Principle Components Analysis, Multinomial Logistic Regression, Naïve Bayes, Perceptron, Support Vector Machines, Random Forest, Neural Networks, model evaluation ROC/AUC, k-fold cross-validation, etc.

Prerequisite(s): BU.510.650 OR BU.914.610) AND (BU.231.620 OR BU.910.611)