PH.330.601.  PERSPECTIVES OF PSYCHIATRY: THE PUBLIC HEALTH FRAMEWORK.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.602.  The Epidemiology of Substance Use and Related Problems.  3 Credits.  

Presents an overview of the epidemiology of drug and alcohol dependence and its relevance to public health. Reviews trends in estimates of prevalence and incidence of drug and alcohol use and problems related to use. Examines factors that might influence subgroup variation and health disparities in drug use outcomes using a dynamic approach that addresses changes over time and across the life course. Explores the universe of suspected causal influences and mechanisms ranging from genetic to societal influences using a model in which transitions in stages of drug involvement are influenced by interactions between individual susceptibility and social environmental factors. Presents research methodology and recent innovations in drug and alcohol epidemiologic research. The goal of this course is further understanding of the usefulness of epidemiology for shedding light on the natural history of drug and alcohol use and the relevance of epidemiologic research to basic and clinical research

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.603.  Psychiatric Epidemiology.  3 Credits.  

Reviews descriptive and analytic epidemiology for major mental disorders. Examines issues of classification and nosology of psychiatric disorders, operational case definitions and measurement techniques, prevalence and incidence rates, natural history, risk factor research and plausible explanations for credible risk factors. Considers aspects of psychiatric epidemiology that illustrate important problems and concepts in epidemiology generally.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.604.  Seminars in Research in Public Mental Health.  1 Credit.  

Integrates academic training with current research in public mental health, including etiological, epidemiologic and intervention research for mental and behavioral disorders across the lifespan. Features presentations by researchers from JHU and other research and practice institutions on the results of state of the art investigations of mental and behavioral health problems and issues of public health significance, emphasizing experimental design and methodology for analysis and discussion.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.605.  Doctoral Seminar in Public Mental Health.  1 Credit.  

Explores and critiques public mental health research and practice, emphasizing key constructs and methods with department faculty through presentations, readings, and group discussions. Develops professional development skills for careers in public mental health.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.607.  PREVENTION of MENTAL DISORDERS: PUBLIC HEALTH InterVENTIONS.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.608.  School-Based Preventive Interventions and Research.  1 Credit.  

Participants will have an an understanding of school-based prevention and research including the theoretical frameworks supporting schools as a context to address public health; the barriers and challenges to implementation of evidence-based interventions in schools; methodological implications of school-based research; and sources of funding for conducting school-based research.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.609.  Climate Change and Mental Health: Research, Practice, and Policy Perspectives.  3 Credits.  

This course will introduce mental health concepts of disorder, distress, well-being, and resilience in the context of climate change. Online course sessions will be structured around three pillars: 1) climate change exposures and their impacts on mental health and well-being, 2) social and environmental justice in climate change and mental health, 3) resilience, psychosocial adaptation, and action. Lectures will be given by research, policy, and mental health practice experts. Research findings on direct and indirect mental health and psychosocial impacts of chronic and acute climate change exposures will be presented. Sessions will explore inequalities in climate change impacts on mental health with examples provided from across local and global social and economic contexts. Individual and community-level resilience, psychosocial adaptation, and areas of priority action will be defined, highlighted, and discussed.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.610.  Knowledge for Managing County and Local Mental Health, Substance Use, and Developmental Disability Authorities.  1 Credit.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.611.  Writing Publishable Manuscripts for the Social and Behavioral Sciences.  2 Credits.  

Provides training in the preparation of manuscripts for submission to peer-reviewed journals, with a focus on empirical papers and systematic reviews. Develops students' ability to serve as reviewers and critically evaluate the written work of peers. Covers topics relevant to effective communication and dissemination of ideas, including journal selection, preparation of cover letters, and responses to reviewers. Incorporates student critiques of other students' works in progress and writing accountability group (WAG) activities.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.612.  Introduction to Behavioral and Psychiatric Genetics.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.613.  Mental Health and the Gut.  2 Credits.  

Explores the strong, bidirectional communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain. Reviews the role of the microbiome in shaping brain health, the link between gastrointestinal symptoms and mental health, and new and seminal research on the brain-gut connection in specific psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, depression, and autism spectrum disorders. Students will learn to read and critique literature on this subject, and will learn the basics of how to design and analyze a study on the microbiome and mental health.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.614.  Advanced Latent Variable Modeling: Matching Model To Question.  3 Credits.  

Reviews concepts, key assumptions, and published applications of advanced latent variable methods commonly used in psychology or mental health research including growth mixture models, latent class analysis with covariates and distal outcomes, and latent transition analysis. Acquaints students with the current state of science related to latent variable methods, which is a quickly advancing field, and gives students the tools they need to build an appropriate latent model for their research question. Topics include growth mixture modeling, latent class regression, latent transition analysis, multi-level models, and measurement invariance. Presents students with examples from psychological, mental health, and developmental datasets with applications in the behavioral and social sciences. Students will apply lessons from didactic lectures in assignments and class projects.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.617.  Psychopathology for Public Health.  3 Credits.  

Examines the major mental disorders, emphasizing the current thinking regarding their essential features and their assessment in public health research. Class sessions include lectures by the instructor and by experts in particular disorders. Reviews best-practice non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches to the treatment of disorders, and commonly-utilized measures in public health and clinical contexts, including self- and informant-report measures, clinician-administered scales, and structured interviews.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.618.  Mental Health in Later Life.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.619.  Psychiatric Genomics.  3 Credits.  

Addresses the rapidly changing landscape of the study of complex genetics diseases. Students explore the current state of the quantitative issues in complex disease genetics, so that they can translate their experiences into research practice. Analyzes genome-wide association scans, epigenetics, and next-generation sequencing, as well as approaches to power calculation, including the use of simulation. Students study the current literature as well as examples from real data sets. In addition to learning the analytic techniques, students also become familiar with the assumptions and limitations of these approaches.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.620.  Qualitative and Quantitative Methods for Mental Health and Psychosocial Research in Low Resource Settings.  3 Credits.  

Introduces mental health as an integral part of global health research, including using qualitative and quantitative methods to conduct needs assessments and to monitor and evaluate interventions. Presents and critiques qualitative strategies for integrating local cultural perspectives into research models. Examines qualitative and quantitative methods of adapting psychiatric assessment tools for use cross-culturally and presents challenges for developing interventions for use in low-resource contexts. Encourages use of critical and creative thinking skills throughout to discuss the issues involved in this important area of study.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.621.  Mixed Methods for Research in Public Health.  2 Credits.  

Introduces students to the field of mixed methods research, which can be thought of as research in which investigators combine quantitative and qualitative research techniques, methods, approaches, concepts or language into a single study or program of research. Focuses on applications in mental health services research. Acquaints student with the logic of inquiry, which includes the use of induction (discovery of patterns), deduction (testing theories and hypotheses), and abduction (uncovering and relying on the best of a set of explanations for understanding results). Explores which questions lend themselves to mixed methods research. Discusses mixed designs and methods, and writing. Students critique mixed methods manuscripts and proposals, and can outline a mixed methods study based on their own program of research.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.622.  Neuroimaging: Methods and Applications in Mental and Behavioral Health.  3 Credits.  

Provides an introduction to neuroimaging methods, relevance and possible implementations of these methods and background to critically evaluate neuroimaging applications in mental and behavioral health research. Introduces basic principles of neuroimaging as applied to human subjects research and specifically public health research. Reviews various imaging applications in the context of their specific methods, source of signal, goals and limitations, and research design and statistics and relevance to mental and behavioral health. Encourages critical evaluation of neuroimaging methods in public mental and behavioral health through review of published studies.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.623.  Brain and Behavior in Mental Disorders.  3 Credits.  

Examines the onset and clinical symptoms of mental disorders over the life course of the developing and aging brain to illustrate neurobiological systems involved in thinking, feeling, and acting. Increases understanding of behavioral disorders, their assessment, neurobiological underpinnings, and systemic influences. Reviews some common disorders, discussion (1) clinical and case studies; (2) definitions and diagnostic methods; treatment, epidemiologic evidence regarding etiology, and (3)challenges to examining brain-behavior relationships across disorders.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.624.  APPLIED POWER ANALYSIS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES.  1 Credit.  

Introduces the concepts of power calculation and sample size estimation. Briefly discusses the theory behind analytic approaches to estimating the power or sample size needed for a proposed hypothesis test. Examines effect sizes and realistic models under which power should be calculated. Discusses effective presentation of power calculations for grant proposals, including graphs. Compares examples of popular software, including R, SAS and STATA.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.625.  Mobile Mental Health Research: Planning and Conducting Ecological Momentary Assessment.  1 Credit.  

Introduces mobile health (mHealth) approaches and methods to study human health behavior and mental health in near real-time and everyday life. Provides a brief overview of Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) studies and critical study design considerations. Gives students hands on experience setting up a small EMA study using freely available online software and smartphone apps.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.626.  Propensity Score Methods in Non-Experimental Research in Mental Health.  1 Credit.  

Discusses the importance of the careful design of non-experimental studies, and the role of propensity scores in that design, with the main goal of providing practical guidance on the use of propensity scores in mental health research. Covers the primary ways of using propensity scores to adjust for confounders when estimating the effect of a particular “cause” or “intervention,” including weighting, sub classification, and matching. Examines issues such as how to specify and estimate the propensity score model, selecting covariates to include in the model, and diagnostics. Draws examples from school-based prevention research, drug abuse and dependence, and non-randomized treatment trials, among others. Primarily emphasizes non-experimental studies; however, also discusses applications to randomized trials.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.627.  GENDER AND MENTAL HEALTH.  1 Credit.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.628.  Gaps and Opportunities in Public Mental Health: A Systems Approach.  3 Credits.  

Acquaints students with mental health systems and the development of a comprehensive approach to the delivery of services to a variety of vulnerable populations living in difficult conditions in the community. Topics include a survey of the variety of current mental health services and evidence-based approaches, the impact on services of governance, organization and financing of services including a primer on Medicaid and Medicare, the link between poverty and mental health and the use of jails as mental asylums, the development of a competent workforce and an introduction to international community mental health issues. Features discussion and problem solving and involves a high degree of interaction between the participants as well as several field trips.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.630.  Stigma and Mental Health: Issues and Interventions.  1 Credit.  

Provides a broad understanding of the interrelationship between stigma and mental health. Focuses on health consequences of stigma for individuals living with mental health disorders. Introduces students to intervention strategies for reducing mental health-related stigma at different health systems and ecological levels, with a focus on the role of mental health service users in stigma reduction. Prepares students to incorporate anti-stigma approaches into their own work.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.631.  LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS AND REGRESSION FOR MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH.  2 Credits.  

Addresses latent class analysis, a latent variable method often used in Mental Health research to identify latent groups of individuals based on patterns of categorical observed variables. Use of additional variables to predict latent class membership will also be explored. Includes discussion of examples from the mental health literature as well as hands-on model-fitting using MPLUS. Latent class analysis is a method of modeling categorical latent variables, such as psychiatric diagnoses, as a function of a set of categorical observed variables.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.632.  Grant Writing: NIH and Other Funding Sources.  1 Credit.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.633.  DEVELOPING AND USING LOGIC MODELS/THEORY OF CHANGE FOR BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION PROGRAMS.  1 Credit.  

Developing and Using Logic Models/Theory of Change for Behavioral Health and Violence Prevention Programs. Introduces the concept of the logic model/theory of change in the development of programming and in the creation of grant applications. Reviews logic models/theory of change strategies from existing programming related to the prevention of behavioral health problems/violence or the treatment/remediation of behavioral health problems/violence/trauma. Discusses strategies for using the logic model/theory of change to build effective teams.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.635.  Conflict Resolution Skills in Mental Health.  1 Credit.  

Examines the dimensions of conflict in the mental health field including, but not limited to assessing one's personal conflict style; dynamics and elements of negotiation; power disparities; conflicting parties' positions, needs, and interests; Mediation--stages, behaving as a mediator, facilitating agreements; dealing with impasse; techniques to re-frame disputes; dealing with high emotions; ethical dilemmas; conflict coaching; and designing conflict prevention and resolution systems in mental health agencies.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.636.  Methods for Handling Missing Data in Psychosocial Research.  1 Credit.  

Since analyses that use just the individuals for whom data is observed can lead to bias and misleading results, students discuss types of missing data, and its implications on analyses. Covers solutions for dealing with attrition (non-response) and missingness on individual items. These solutions include weighting approaches for unit non-response and imputation approaches for item non-response. Emphasizes practical implementation of the proposed strategies, including discussion of software to implement imputation approaches. Examples come from school-based prevention research as well as drug abuse and dependence.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.638.  The Science of Narrative: Why Storytelling Is Important to Research.  1 Credit.  

Introduces the basic components of storytelling. Examines the science within the narrative arts. Challenges students to present the art within public health sciences. Emphasizes critical perspective on how nuances and merits of public health research should be expressed to relevant audiences, including community members and policymakers. Explores why storytelling is a powerful modality for conveying uncommon knowledge and insight in a manner that appreciates common experiences. Prepares students to combine data and narrative while acknowledging both as essential to effective public health advocacy.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.639.  The Intersection of Mental and Physical Health.  3 Credits.  

Addresses the epidemiology, consequences, measurement, and implications for health service delivery of co-morbidity of mental and physical disorders. Employs a conceptual framework that emphasizes the potential psychological, behavioral, social, and biological mechanisms through which mental and medical illness interact to cause disability and death. This model has implications for development of new service delivery models that integrate the care of mental health disorders into the care of medical conditions such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Students interact with investigators and clinicians in lecture format, examine case studies, and generate a paper related to a medical-psychiatric co-morbidity of their choosing.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.640.  Childhood Victimization: A Public Health Perspective.  3 Credits.  

Examines childhood victimization across a wide spectrum of victimizations, including sexual and physical abuse, peer and sibling assaults, witnessing domestic violence and verbal abuse and neglect. Acquaints students with the epidemiology of childhood victimization, reviews existing victim and perpetrator-focused interventions, and explores established emerging prevention strategies. Reviews legal policies aimed at reducing childhood victimization, their strengths and weaknesses, and challenges to the notion that childhood victimization is, or can be, effectively addressed solely or primarily via criminal justice interventions

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.642.  Manuscript Writing for the Social and Behavioral Sciences.  1 Credit.  

Trains students to prepare manuscripts for submission to peer-reviewed journals with a focus on empirical papers. Discusses topics relevant to effective communication and dissemination of ideas, including journal selection.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.646.  Autism Spectrum Disorder in Public Health.  2 Credits.  

Since the number of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has increased dramatically over the past two decades and is now a major public health issue, students learn about the state of the science of autism epidemiological and etiological research, and the emerging questions for Public Health. Students also learn about prescriptive epidemiology, genetics, environmental risk factors, and prognosis of ASD, as well as long-term outcomes.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.647.  Childhood Victimization: An Overview of Public Health Efforts.  1 Credit.  

Examines childhood victimization from a public health perspective. Familiarizes students with public health strategies used to address three related domains: detection and prevention, treating victims, and offender interventions. Challenges students to critically examine policy and practice, using cases such as the Penn State sex abuse scandal. Uses small group break-out sessions to help familiarize students with the public health approach to violence prevention.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.649.  Investigating Behavioral Health Outbreaks and Epidemics.  1 Credit.  

Introduces outbreak investigation, with a focus on outbreaks and epidemics of behavioral health problems such as substance use, mental health, violence, and neurocognitive disorders. Provides hands-on experience through a practice investigation that uses examples and data from a real outbreak of lung injuries linked to use of e-cigarettes.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.650.  Methods in Implementation Science.  3 Credits.  

Introduces methods, research designs and evaluation approaches that can be used to study implementation science questions. Includes an introduction of methods such as mixed-methods, measurement validity and reliability, randomized and non-randomized designs, and simulation studies using examples from mental and behavioral health settings.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.657.  Statistics for Psychosocial Research: Measurement.  4 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.658.  Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in International Humanitarian Settings.  2 Credits.  

Explores key issues in the development and evaluation of mental health and psychosocial support interventions with populations affected by humanitarian crises, such as natural disasters and armed conflicts. Discusses such questions as: ‘how do populations in diverse socio-cultural settings define mental health in the context of humanitarian crises?’; ‘How can we build on existing resources and practices that promote mental health in humanitarian crises?’; ‘What is known from epidemiological and intervention studies about common mental health problems and effective interventions in humanitarian settings?’. Challenges participants to reflect on translating science to practice, and vice versa. Course methods entail a mix of multimedia presentations and case discussions, focusing on real-world experiences.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.659.  Current Issues in Military Mental Health.  1 Credit.  

Explores issues in mental health affecting U.S. military personnel and veterans over more than a decade of war. Presents an overview of the epidemiology of mental disorders and suicide within military populations. Critically reviews existing epidemiological studies and the current military psychiatric epidemiology literature. Introduces military mental health data systems used for surveillance and research. Discusses challenges in prevention and service delivery. Explores the significance of traumatic brain injury. Reviews evolving practices in deployment mental health screening. Addresses controversial topics including the practice of polypsychopharmacy, multiple deployments, recruitment, retention, and separation policies, and the role of the all-volunteer force. Examines current issues in the care of military veterans, including homelessness, suicide, and substance abuse.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.660.  Grant Writing for the Social and Behavioral Sciences.  3 Credits.  

Targets the development of effective research proposals in public mental health, including the identification of research questions, factors related to significance and innovation, study design, and analytic approaches. Reviews of research proposals and articles address issues such as topic selection, sample selection, measurement , and analytic strategies. Reviews strengths and weakness of proposals and studies and considers recent advances in epidemiologic and statistical methods as alternative approaches for addressing research questions.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.661.  Social, Psychological, and Developmental Processes in the Etiology of Mental Disorders.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.662.  Public Mental Health.  2 Credits.  

Provides an overview and framework for the full spectrum of public mental health. Presents key concepts in public health applied to mental and behavioral health and disorders. Discusses the causes and consequences of mental health disorders, the frameworks for understanding the origins of these disorders, strategies for treatment and prevention, and issues related to health services and policy for mental and behavioral health

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.663.  Mental and Behavioral Clinical Practice Exposure.  2 Credits.  

Introduces students to the mental health/behavioral care clinical settings. Acquaints students with the therapeutic relationship that exists between clinician and patient. Presents opportunities for shadowing and research partnerships with clinicians. Provides access to potential clinical data sets for exploration and analysis. Emphasizes practical hands-on experience over didactic secondary exposure. Challenges student notions of the psychiatric patient and their care, while destigmatizing both the illnesses and the treatment processes. Encourages creative hypothesis generation grown from observation of solvable challenges experienced in the field.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.664.  Introduction to Mental Health Services.  3 Credits.  

Examines the level of met and unmet need for mental health care and predictors of mental health treatment-seeking in community settings. Also addresses the issues of disparities in access to, and the use of, mental health services; mental illness stigma and attitudes towards mental health treatment seeking; the impact of public campaigns to reduce stigma and enhance treatment seeking; the impact of new pharmaceutical marketing strategies on demand for mental health care and national and international trends in mental health service use. Finally, acquaints students with the structure, staffing and financing of mental health services in the US and other countries and recent trends in the quality of care provided in these services.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.665.  Climate Change and Mental Health.  1 Credit.  

Introduces mental health concepts of disorder, distress, well-being, and resilience that warrant consideration in the context of climate change. Structured around chronic and acute climate change exposures, including rising temperatures, rising sea levels, and disasters, such as floods, hurricanes, and wildfires. Explores mental health impacts of particular climate change exposures with examples from across high-, middle-, and low-resource contexts. Includes discussion of social inequalities on the impacts of climate change on mental health.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.667.  Mental Health and the Law.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.668.  Complex Systems Thinking in Aging Research: Fundamentals and Methods.  1 Credit.  

Trains students on the fundamentals of systems thinking. Considers key aging-related health outcomes from a systems science lens. Examines basic systems models (dynamic models, agent-based models, social network models). Examines application of systems thinking on evaluating health programs and polices.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.669.  Epidemiology of Major Mental Disorders.  2 Credits.  

Presents an overview of the epidemiology of anxiety and mood disorders, schizophrenia and associated syndromes, affective psychosis including bipolar disorder, and dementia and related syndromes. Prepares students who have basic knowledge of the clinical features of the syndromes, but will touch briefly on issues of assessment in the context of epidemiology. It includes the fundamentals of descriptive epidemiology for each syndrome (prevalence, incidence, natural history); consequences of the syndromes for impairment, disability, and general health; and an assessment of risk factors for the syndromes, including a discussion of the genetic epidemiology of the syndromes. Examines the special conceptual challenges for the field of epidemiology which are presented by the mental disorders.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.672.  Evaluation of Mental Health Service Systems.  1 Credit.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.673.  Prevention Research in Mental Health.  1 Credit.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.674.  Suicide As A Public Health Problem.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.675.  Suicide Prevention: Problem Solving Seminar.  3 Credits.  

Explores the following suicide-related topics: history, frameworks and theories; epidemiology, etiological factors and mechanisms; national and local suicide data sources; policy and preventive interventions; high-risk populations; common barriers and challenges to implementing and sustaining suicide prevention. Introduces leadership and management competencies including organizational change and strategic plans. Presents strategies for designing systems-level interventions. Engages students in interprofessional team approaches.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.677.  Translation of Mental Health Research Into Field-based Public Health Interventions.  2 Credits.  

Provides a broad overview of how evidence-based mental and behavioral health interventions are being interwoven into education, health, and community programs in the United States and around the world in order to prevent or intervene with issues of interpersonal violence and trauma-related disorders and promote well-being and mental health resiliency. Introduces examples for different populations across the lifecourse and in different US and global contexts. Addresses challenges of integrating and scaling up interventions in non-clinical settings.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.680.  Promoting Mental Health and Preventing Mental Disorders in Low- and Middle-income Countries.  3 Credits.  

Focuses on research and intervention approaches in low- and middle-income countries in the field of mental health prevention and promotion. Particularly emphasizes populations exposed to adversity, and challenges students to bridge the gap between research and practice in this area. Discusses the determinants of mental health, and how they can be targeted: at different life stages and different socio-ecological levels (e.g., family, school, and neighborhood). Addresses such questions as ‘What is resilience, and how can it be promoted?’, ‘How can interventions prevent depression in women exposed to intimate partner violence?‘, and ‘How do poverty, violence and malnutrition impact mental health?‘. Uses real-world examples, and follows a case method approach.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.681.  Mental Health and Psychosocial Needs of Refugees After Resettlement in High income Countries.  1 Credit.  

Provides a broad understanding of the refugee resettlement process and presents data on the epidemiology of mental health and psychosocial problems among refugees resettled in high income countries like the U.S. Introduces methods for measurement and evaluation of these problems and prepares students to be able to design mental health studies among this population. Explores mental health treatment options and service utilization among resettled refugees in high income countries.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.682.  PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF HARMONIZATION IN MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH.  2 Credits.  

Introduces concepts and key assumptions of item response theory (IRT). Explores novel applications of IRT to refinement of measures, assessment of differential item functioning, computer adaptive testing, and calibration of metrics across diverse samples. Students apply lessons from didactic lectures in a laboratory setting using prepared examples. Original data are welcome.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.690.  Applications and Analysis of Epigenetic Data in Public Health Research.  1 Credit.  

Presents applications of epigenetic measurement in public health research. Begins by providing a rationale for such work, then describing measurement tools, from single-site methylation typing, to array-based methods, and whole-genome sequencing. Study design options, quality control analyses, and association analyses will then be presented. Examples based on both mental and physical health outcomes will be used.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.695.  BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND THE LAW: HOW DID WE GET HERE AND WHERE ARE WE HEADED?.  2 Credits.  

Presents an overview of the development of law and policy on a broad scale and as applied to the field of public behavioral health and human rights in the U.S. Examines the concept of the "law of the land.” Reviews relevant law in the areas of patient rights, consent to treatment, right to refuse treatment, financing, governance and forensics.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.700.  Public Health Approaches in Autism and Developmental Disabilities.  3 Credits.  

Examines public health approaches to the assessment, etiology, services, and policy issues related to autism and developmental disabilities. Introduces the state of the science of autism and developmental disabilities epidemiology, and emerging questions for Public Health. Includes presentations and discussions of current information on descriptive epidemiology, genetics, environmental risk factors, and prognosis of ASD. Presents research on long-term outcomes in individuals with ASD. Provides an overview of research progress to date and points to challenges as we work to learn more about this enigmatic neurodevelopmental disability.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.800.  MPH Capstone Mental Health.  2 Credits.  

The MPH Capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that simulates a professional practice experience.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.802.  Seminar on Aging, Cognition and Neurodegenerative Disorders.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.805.  Seminar on Statistical Methods for Mental Health.  1 Credit.  

Students discuss recent advances in statistical methods in mental health. Class sessions include student and faculty presentations as well as discussions of recent articles in the literature. Topics include missing data, longitudinal data analysis, causal inference, and measurement.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.811.  MHS Thesis in Mental Health: from Proposal to Publication I.  1 Credit.  

Students are required to conduct a systematic review of the literature or a data-driven paper in partial fulfillment of the Master of Health Science (MHS) degree in the Department of Mental Health. Students will be provided with basic research and organizational skills needed for successful completion of the MHS project. Topics include: conducting a systematic review or literature review for data driven papers, selecting an appropriate research design, and interpreting findings.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.812.  MHS Thesis in Mental Health: from Proposal to Publication II.  1 Credit.  

Students are required to conduct a systematic review of the literature or data-driven paper in partial fulfillment of the Master of Health Science (MHS) degree in the Department of Mental Health. Emphasis is placed on revision and dissemination of the final project. Topics include: Selecting an outlet for dissemination (e.g., journal submission, conference presentation) and writing assignments (e.g., cover letter, abstract for conference).

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.820.  Thesis Research Mental Health.  1 - 22 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.830.  Postdoctoral Research Mental Health.  1 - 22 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.840.  Special Studies and Research Mental Health.  1 - 22 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.895.  MPH Practicum: Mental Health.  1 - 4 Credits.  

The MPH Practicum is a mentored, hands-on practical public health experience, which involves meaningful participation and interaction with public health professionals.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.330.990.  Computer Lab: Epigenetic Data in Public Health Research.  1 Credit.  

Offers hands-on computer lab experience analyzing epigenetics data using quality control and statistical association analyses presented in the course, 330.690 Applications and Analysis of Epigenetic Data in Public Health Research. Real and simulated data will be used to demonstrate software that will implement particular programs. Software applications will primarily use the R statistical environment and packages in BioConductor.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.