AS.310.106.  Introduction to Korean History and Culture.  3 Credits.  

This course offers a comprehensive overview of Korean history and culture from ancient times to the modern era. Through primary, secondary, and audio-visual sources, students will become familiar not only with the overall contours of the entirety of Korean history, but also with its cultural and religious legacy. The course combines lectures and class discussions.

Area: Humanities

AS.310.210.  Documentary Photography in a Changing China.  3 Credits.  

This course aims to inspire students to explore the impacts, meanings, and explanations of social transformation in contemporary China, via the lens of documentary photography. The photographic images of selective topics will include the products of photojournalism and documentary photography, and several documentary films, by both Chinese and non-Chinese photographers. While one picture is worth thousand words, one picture may also provoke countless interpretations. Students are strongly encouraged to read broadly about different aspects of social transformations in contemporary China, and to select and curate their own subjects of photo images. The spirit of comparative study of documentary photography of China and other parts of world will be strongly encouraged. Active class participation is imperative. A small exhibition on the campus will be organized by the Spring semester. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.310.222.  The Religions of Korea.  3 Credits.  

This course offers an overview of the religions of Korea, both indigenous and foreign, old and new. Attention will be paid to the history of these religions, their impact on society, as well as their teachings and objectives. Students will engage with various forms of secondary as well as primary sources including scriptures, sermons, and religious tracts.

Area: Humanities

AS.310.230.  Chinese Politics and Society.  3 Credits.  

This introductory course will familiarize students with the major dynamics of political and social change in contemporary China since 1949. The course will be divided chronologically into four main topics: 1. The contested processes of nation-state making in modern China before 1949; 2. The making of the socialist system during the Mao Years and its dismantling since 1978; 3. The Reform Era transformation to a market economy with Chinese characteristics; 4. The dynamic relationships among the state, market and society since the new millennium. Students will explore how scholars have explained major political and social changes with reference to individual and collective rationalities, specific organizational and institutional arrangements, and specific strategic and cultural mechanisms of Chinese political and social habits.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.310.302.  China, Human Rights, and U.S. Policy Responses.  3 Credits.  

This seminar explores select human rights issues in China (e.g., human rights impacts of the management of COVID-19, the Hong Kong protests, mass detentions/forced labor in Xinjiang province) and the extraterritorial reach of China’s human rights challenges. As a practice and policy-oriented course, we will also investigate different responses and actions taken by the U.S. government and Congress, including hearings, legislation, reports, statements, etc. Class assignments include advocacy for Chinese prisoners of conscience (each student will “adopt” one currently detained PoC), and written work that mirrors real-world writing. We’ll also have several human rights advocates and experts visit the class to share their experiences and insights. This seminar explores select human rights issues in China (e.g., human rights impacts of the management of COVID-19, the Hong Kong protests, mass detentions/forced labor in Xinjiang province) and the extraterritorial reach of China’s human rights challenges. As a practice and policy-oriented course, we will also investigate different responses and actions taken by the U.S. government and Congress, including hearings, legislation, reports, statements, etc. Class assignments include advocacy for Chinese prisoners of conscience (each student will “adopt” one currently detained PoC), and written work that mirrors real-world writing. We’ll also have several human rights advocates and experts visit the class to share their experiences and insights.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.310.305.  Southeast Asia and US Security Strategy.  3 Credits.  

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.310.312.  Masterpieces of Chinese Literature: Song through 20th Century, a Literature-in-Translation class.  3 Credits.  

In the millennium from the Song Dynasty (960-1280) to the modern era court poets and master storytellers, eccentric misfits and satiric novelists, as well as courtesans and film makers all considered a complex and changing China. We will look at the masterpieces of this millennium, examining both text and cultural context. In examining the texts we will rely on close reading in order to develop sound critical interpretations. We will also place the text in cultural context, considering the multiple forces--political, economic, artistic and religious-- that shaped the lives of these writers and the cultures they observed.

Area: Humanities

Writing Intensive

AS.310.316.  First Year Classical Chinese: Philosophers, Poets and Fantasists: An Introduction to Chinese Literature in the Original Classical Texts.  3 Credits.  

We will read arguments, anecdotes and stories, beginning with the philosophers of the ancient period, including the imaginative paradigms of the Daoist writer Zhuangzi, and continue with the strange writings allied with shamanism and goddess-worship. We will continue with the fantastical writers of the medieval world and finish with anecdotes of the strange from the Ming and Qing. Because this is a language as well as a literature class, in addition to literary content and social history as background, we will emphasize grammar and vocabulary. Class preparation will require language exercises, translations, readings in English and there will be a final translation/research paper.

Prerequisite(s): (AS.373.115 AND AS.373.116) OR (AS.378.115 OR AS.378.116) or Instructor permission.

Area: Humanities

AS.310.320.  Sociology of Urban China.  3 Credits.  

Urban China has gone through two major social transformations since 1949: the embrace of a central planning socialist system between early 1950s and late 70s, and the embrace of neo-liberal market economy in the so-call “socialism with Chinese characteristics” since 1980. While the political regime remains the same over time, many profound changes have occurred in economic life, social life, cultural life, spiritual life and civil life. What really happened in the social transformation of urban China? What would explain those changes? How did people in different walk of life deal with those huge and deep social transformation? To address these concerns, we will exam a list of issues. Topics includes changes in population and demographic characteristics, employment structure and job market, workplace and residential communities, income and wealth distributions, segregation impacts of urban household registration systems, urban consumption patterns, courting cultures and dressing codes, spiritual practices, and social mobility and social stratifications. In the realm of public policies, we will pay special attentions to the issues of transportation, housing, medical service, public education, social insurance, and environmental protection. We will also study the characteristics of contentious politics and how social conflicts of power, interest, justice, cultural and belief were processed in urban China.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.310.322.  Korean History Through Film and Literature.  3 Credits.  

In this course, students will engage with select topics in Korean history from premodern and modern times and examine how the past has been represented through various forms of film and literature. This will be combined with readings of academic articles to allow students to gauge the distance between scholarship and cultural expressions of history. Through this, students will be introduced to the highly contested and often polarizing nature of Korean history and the competition surrounding historical memory. Prior coursework in East Asian Studies strongly recommended.

Area: Humanities

Writing Intensive

AS.310.323.  The History and Culture of North Korea.  3 Credits.  

This is a seminar that investigates the history and culture of North Korea. Course materials include scholarly articles, political tracts, biographies, movies, as well as works of fiction. For the final project, students will write an extended research paper on a topic of their choice.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.310.340.  Development and Social Change in Rural China.  3 Credits.  

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.310.402.  Labor Politics in China.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.310.404.  Korea in the World.  3 Credits.  

This seminar examines Korea’s interactions with the outside world including Japan, China, and the Americas, as well as Europe and Southeast Asia. We will touch upon a wide range of topics, including political, economic, and military interactions, as well as cultural, intellectual, and religious engagements. The purpose is to identify larger transnational trends and parallels in understanding Korea’s position in the world.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.310.431.  Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies.  3 Credits.  

Students may earn honors in the East Asian Studies major by maintaining a 3.7 average in the major and completing a senior thesis by taking the year-long AS.310.431 & AS.310.432 Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies. Students are required to secure the mentorship of an adviser among the EAS faculty before asking for permission to enroll in the course.Students who decide, after the fall semester, that they are unable to complete the senior thesis and who do not enroll for the spring will be graded S/U for the fall semester. Only students who complete the fall semester course will be permitted to enroll for the spring.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.310.432.  Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies.  3 Credits.  

This course is the continuation of Senior Thesis Course AS.360.431 for students completing their thesis in the East Asian Studies program.

Prerequisite(s): AS.310.431

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.310.501.  Independent Study - East Asia.  1 - 3 Credits.  

Students carry out an independent research project involving East Asia.

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.310.592.  Summer Internship.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.