AS.040.102.  The Art and Archaeology of Early Greece.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the origins and rise of Greek civilization from the Early Bronze Age to the Persian Wars (ca. 3100-480 B.C.), focusing on major archaeological sites, sanctuaries, material culture, and artistic production.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.103.  The Roman Empire.  3 Credits.  

This introductory course examines the history, society, and culture of the Roman state in the Imperial age (ca. 31 BCE-ca. 500 CE), during which it underwent a traumatic transition from an oligarchic to a monarchic form of government, attained its greatest territorial expanse, produced its most famous art, architecture, and literature, experienced vast cultural and religious changes, and finally was transformed into an entirely different ("late antique") form of society. All readings in English.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.104.  The Roman Republic: History, Culture, and Afterlife.  3 Credits.  

This introductory level course examines the history, society, and culture of the Roman state in the Republican period (509-31 BCE), during which it expanded from a small city-state to a Mediterranean empire. We also consider the Republic's importance for American revolutionaries in the 18th century. All readings in English.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.105.  Elementary Ancient Greek.  4 Credits.  

This course provides a comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of ancient Greek. During the first semester, the focus will be on morphology and vocabulary. Credit is given only upon completion of a year's work. Cannot be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

AS.040.106.  Elementary Ancient Greek.  4 Credits.  

Course provides comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of ancient Greek. The first semester’s focus is morphology and vocabulary; the second semester’s emphasis is syntax and reading. Credit is given only upon completion of a year’s work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.105

AS.040.107.  Elementary Latin.  3.5 Credits.  

This course provides a comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of Latin for new students, as well as a systematic review for those students with a background in Latin. Emphasis during the first semester will be on morphology and vocabulary. Credit is given only upon completion of a year’s work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

AS.040.108.  Elementary Latin.  3.5 Credits.  

Course provides comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of Latin for new students as well as systematic review for students with background in Latin. The first semester's emphasis is on morphology and vocabulary; the second semester's focus is on syntax and reading. Credit is given only upon completion of a year's work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.107

AS.040.109.  Freshman Seminar: The Greeks and Their Emotions.  3 Credits.  

This seminar is meant as an introduction to the study of ancient emotions, with a particular emphasis on how the ancient Greeks conceptualized, portrayed and lived their emotions through linguistic, literary and artistic expression. After an analysis of how the ancient Greek emotional experience differs from our own, we shall focus on the phenomenon of emotion as deeply rooted in the physical body, and in light of this we will contemplate (and question) its universality. You will also learn how to research and write a paper. Texts will be read in translation. No knowledge of ancient Greek required.

Area: Humanities

Writing Intensive

AS.040.111.  Ancient Greek Civilization.  3 Credits.  

The course will introduce students to major aspects of the ancient Greek civilization, with special emphasis placed upon culture, society, archaeology, literature, and philosophy.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.121.  Ancient Greek Mythology: Art, Narratives, and Modern Mythmaking.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on major and often intricate myths and mythical patterns of thought as they are reflected in compelling ancient visual and textual narratives. Being one of the greatest treasure troves of the ancient world, these myths will further be considered in light of their rich reception in the medieval and modern world (including their reception in the modern fields of anthropology and philosophy).

Area: Humanities

AS.040.123.  Freshman Seminar: Values at Play: Identity and Greek Fiction in the Roman Empire.  3 Credits.  

What is the role of fiction and play in expressing identity in a society? Play in the Greek world was synonymous with the values of ‘high’ intellectual pursuits, namely, paideia, the Greek word for education and culture. Works defined by playfulness make up an artistic epoch of Greek literature written under the Roman Empire commonly known as the ‘Second Sophistic.’ This course introduces students to this world and its cultural artifacts. It introduces students to specific categories of fiction as a way into understanding identity. The class examines a series of fictional genres and styles: Latin picaresque, Greek ideal erotic fiction, epistolary fiction, travelogues, and the autobiography. The purpose of the class is to be able to understand these works as cultural artifacts whose form and content express discourses about identity - of ethnicity and the 'home,' gender and sexuality, colonialism and class - while appreciating the rebellious fun of these works. All sources are provided in English and no experience or background in Classics is required to participate in the course. Dean's Prize Teaching Fellowship Course.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.126.  Religion, Music and Society in Ancient Greece.  3 Credits.  

Emphasis on ancient Greek ritual and mythology; on ancient music, religion, and society; and on cultural institutions such as symposia (drinking parties) and festivals.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.137.  Freshman Seminar: Archaeology at the Crossroads: The Ancient Eastern Mediterranean through Objects in the JHU Archaeological Museum.  3 Credits.  

This seminar investigates the Eastern Mediterranean as a space of intense cultural interaction in the Late Bronze Age, exploring how people, ideas, and things not only came into contact but deeply influenced one another through maritime trade, art, politics, etc. In addition to class discussion, we will work hands-on with artifacts from the JHU Archaeological Museum, focusing on material from Cyprus.

Area: Humanities

Writing Intensive

AS.040.140.  Gender and Sexuality in Early Greece and the Eastern Mediterranean.  3 Credits.  

In this course we will explore evidence and interpretations of gender and sexuality in the region of the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean during the third and second millennia BCE. Material investigated will include the “snake goddess” figures from Minoan Crete, anthropomorphic figurines from the Cyclades and Cyprus, wall paintings, etc. In each case we will consider the history of interpretation as well as investigate the objects’ archaeological and sociocultural contexts. Discussion topics will include representational ambiguity, the specific materialities of objects, and their possible roles in activities construing gender. The course will incorporate material from the JHU Archaeological Museum.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.145.  Story and Argument from Homer to Petrarch.  3 Credits.  

Stories entertain us, but we also tell them to make a point. This course will explore the ways that stories were used to make points by Greek and Latin authors from Homer to Petrarch, while also looking at, and comparing them to, the techniques of argument contemporaneous thinkers were developing. This is a course about narrative and rhetoric but also about how and in what way stories matter.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.147.  Freshman Seminar: Art, Politics, and Propaganda in Ancient Rome.  3 Credits.  

We will examine visual expressions of propaganda in the city of Rome, considering how emperors used public art to promote their political agendas and their ideological vision of power."

Area: Humanities

AS.040.152.  Medical Terminology.  3 Credits.  

This course investigates the Greek and Latin roots of modern medical terminology, with additional focus on the history of ancient medicine and its role in the development of that terminology.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.205.  Intermediate Ancient Greek.  3 Credits.  

Reading ability in classical Greek is developed through a study of various authors.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.105 AND AS.040.106 or equivalent

Area: Humanities

AS.040.206.  Intermediate Ancient Greek.  3 Credits.  

Reading ability in classical Greek is developed through a study of various authors.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.205

Area: Humanities

AS.040.207.  Intermediate Latin.  3 Credits.  

Although emphasis is still placed on development of rapid comprehension, readings and discussions introduce student to study of Latin literature, principally through texts of various authors.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.107 AND AS.040.108 or equivalent

Area: Humanities

AS.040.208.  Intermediate Latin.  3 Credits.  

Reading ability in Latin is developed through the study of various authors, primarily Cicero (fall) and Vergil (spring).

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.207

Area: Humanities

AS.040.213.  The Painted Worlds of Early Greece: Fantasy, Form and Action.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the creation and role of early Aegean wall painting. Found primarily in palaces, villas and ritual spaces, these paintings interacted with architecture to create micro-worlds for social activities taking place in their midst. Their subjects range—from mythological to documentary, from ornamental to instructive. They depict dance and battle, fantastical beasts and daily life. We examine their complex relationship to lived reality as well as the activities that surrounded them, from their crafting, to performance of rituals, to their role in “international” relations.

Area: Humanities

Writing Intensive

AS.040.218.  Celebration and Performance in Early Greece.  3 Credits.  

Surviving imagery suggests that persons in Minoan and Mycenaean societies engaged in various celebratory performances, including processions, feasts, and ecstatic dance. This course explores archaeological evidence of such celebrations, focusing on sociocultural roles, bodily experience, and interpretive challenges.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.232.  Island Archaeology: The Social Worlds of Crete, Cyprus and the Cyclades.  3 Credits.  

Islands present highly distinctive contexts for social life. We examine three island worlds of the third and second millennia BCE through their archaeological remains, each with its particularities. These are places where water had a unique and powerful meaning, where boat travel was part of daily life, where palaces flourished and where contact with other societies implied voyages of great distance across the sea. Class combines close study of material culture and consideration of island-specific interpretive paradigms; students work with artifacts in the JHU Archaeological Museum.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.237.  Myth and Metamorphosis.  3 Credits.  

Beginning with close study of the poem itself, this course will examine the unequaled influence of Ovid's Metamorphoses on subsequent literature and art, including theater and film.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.238.  Freshman Seminar: Magic and Miracles from Antiquity to the Renaissance.  3 Credits.  

This freshman seminar will explore concepts of magic and miracles and their different forms from ancient Greece and Rome and early Christianity through the Middle Ages up to the Renaissance. Dean's Prize Teaching Fellowship Course.

Area: Humanities

Writing Intensive

AS.040.241.  The Greeks and Their Emotions.  3 Credits.  

This seminar is meant as an introduction to the study of ancient emotions, with a particular emphasis on how the Greeks of the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods conceptualized, portrayed and lived their emotions through linguistic, literary and artistic expression. After an analysis of how the ancient Greek terminology for the emotions differs from our own, we shall focus on the phenomenon of emotion as deeply rooted in the physical body, and in light of this we will contemplate (and question) its universality. Texts will be read in translation. No knowledge of ancient Greek required.

Area: Humanities

Writing Intensive

AS.040.245.  Heroes: The Ancient Greek Way.  3 Credits.  

Students will acquire more in-depth knowledge of Ancient Greek literature by reading and discussing its most important and famous texts, from the Iliad and the Odyssey to tragedy to philosophy. Knowledge of Greek is not required.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.111 OR AS.040.121

Area: Humanities

AS.040.300.  The Ancient Novel.  3 Credits.  

In this course we will follow the fortunes of the ancient Greek and Roman novels.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.103 OR AS.040.104 OR AS.040.111 OR AS.040.112 OR AS.040.121 OR AS.040.133 OR AS.040.245

Area: Humanities

AS.040.305.  Advanced Ancient Greek.  3 Credits.  

This course aims to increase proficiency and improve comprehension of the ancient Greek language. Intensive reading of ancient Greek texts, with attention to grammar, idiom, translation, etc. Reading of prose or verse authors, depending on the needs of students. Specific offerings vary. Co-listed with AS.040.705.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.205 AND AS.040.206 or equivalent

Area: Humanities

AS.040.306.  Advanced Ancient Greek.  3 Credits.  

Reading of prose or verse authors, depending on the needs of students. Co-listed with AS.040.702.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.205 AND AS.040.206 or equivalent

Area: Humanities

AS.040.307.  Advanced Latin Prose.  3 Credits.  

This course aims to increase proficiency and improve comprehension of the Latin language. Intensive reading of Latin texts, with attention to grammar, idiom, translation, etc. Specific offerings vary. Co-listed with AS.040.707.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.207 AND AS.040.208 or equivalent

Area: Humanities

AS.040.308.  Advanced Latin Poetry.  3 Credits.  

The aim of this course is to increase proficiency and improve comprehension of the Latin language. Intensive reading of Latin texts, with close attention to matters of grammar, idiom, and translation. Co-listed with AS.040.710.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.207 AND AS.040.208 or equivalent

Area: Humanities

AS.040.348.  Worlds of Homer.  3 Credits.  

Through texts, art, and archaeological remains, this course examines the various worlds of Homer--those recalled in the Iliad and Odyssey, those within which the epics were composed, and those born of the poet's unique creative work. Class will make museum visits. Ancient texts read in translation..

Area: Humanities

AS.040.366.  The Archaeology of Ancient Cyprus: Investigating a Mediterranean Island World in the JHU Museum.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the visual and material worlds of ancient Cyprus from the earliest human evidence through the Iron Age. Course topics will include the island's unique position between the Aegean and Near East and how this has impacted both Cyprus' ancient past and the way in which it has been conceived in the modern world. Class involves regular analysis of artifacts based in the Archaeological Museum.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.373.  Propaganda and the Art of Visual Politics during the Roman Empire.  3 Credits.  

We will examine visual expressions of propaganda in the city of Rome, considering how emperors used public art to promote their political agendas and their ideological vision of power.Dean's Teaching Fellowship course

Area: Humanities

AS.040.377.  The Other Life of the Doctor: Fiction, Identity, and the Intellectual in the Roman Empire.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the role of fiction in the presentation of personal identity among the intellectual elite of the Roman Empire. Intellectuals in the so-called ‘Second Sophistic’ told stories which are ridiculous, bizarre, and clearly fictional. Some pretend to have visited utopias in the wilderness, of having seen scientific and medical marvels, and of communing with other dead intellectuals. This class focuses on stories of the unbelievable, paradoxical, and fake but which are written as first hand accounts by real historical intellectuals of the Roman Empire. The class will be broken down into providing background as to what a Greek intellectual or ‘sophist’ was exactly, what demands were placed on intellectuals to make up stories, such as in the performance of declamation, and how even from the early days of Greek history the boundaries between truth and fiction were at issue. After providing context to characters and settings of the Roman Empire’s intellectual culture, we examine the voices of people, including physicians like Galen, who used the fictional motifs of utopias, adventures, romance, ghosts stories among others to construct their identities. These fictional elements often were the means by which issues of ethnicity, power, gender, and tradition were hashed out. All sources are provided in English and no experience or background in Classics is required to participate in the course.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.400.  The Archaeology of Cyprus: Investigating a Mediterranean Island World in the JHU Museum.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the visual and material worlds of ancient Cyprus from the earliest human evidence through the Iron Age. Class involves regular analysis of artifacts based in the Archaeological Museum.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.407.  Survey of Latin Literature I: Beginnings to the Augustan Age.  3 Credits.  

This intensive Latin survey is designed for very advanced undergraduate students--normally those who have completed two semesters of Advanced Latin (AS.040.307/308)--and PhD students preparing for their Latin translation exam. In this course, the first half of a year-long sequence, we will read substantial texts of major Republican and some Augustan authors. The weekly pace is designed to inculcate greater speed and accuracy in Latin reading, and provide significant coverage of various kinds of texts.Recommended background: AS.040.307-308 or equivalent

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.307 AND AS.040.308 or permission of instructor.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.408.  Survey of Latin Literature II: Early Empire to the Post-Classical Period.  3 Credits.  

This intensive Latin survey is designed for very advanced undergraduate students (normally those who have completed the regular undergraduate sequence through the advanced level) and PhD students preparing for their Latin translation exam. In this course, the second half of a year-long sequence, we will read substantial texts of major Imperial authors, as well as a selection of works from Late Antiquity and the Post-Classical period. The weekly pace is designed to inculcate greater speed and accuracy in Latin reading and to provide significant coverages of various kinds of texts. Prior completion of AS.040.407 preferred but not required.

Prerequisite(s): AS.040.307 AND AS.040.308 or equivalent.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.414.  Junior-Senior Seminar: The Art of Ancient Tragedy.  3 Credits.  

This seminar explores the form and function of tragedy in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds by investigating the dramatic texts themselves, ancient and modern discussions about tragedy, and archaeological remains. As a Junior-Senior Seminar, this course includes instruction in core research methods within Classics and culminates in an individualized research project.Classics majors only

Area: Humanities

AS.040.415.  Junior-Senior Capstone: Odysseus Becomes an Ass.  3 Credits.  

We shall focus on one Greek epic, The Odyssey, and one Latin novel, Apuleius' Golden Ass: what do Odysseus and a donkey have in common? Do they experience similar adventures? How does magic play into the two stories? We shall read both texts in their entirety, including passages in the original languages, and unearth the connections between these two masterpieces of ancient literature.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.417.  Survey of Greek Literature I: Homer to the Classical Period.  3 Credits.  

We shall read an extensive selection of major texts of Greek literature from Homer to the classical period.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.418.  Survey of Greek Literature II: Hellenistic Period to Imperial Period.  3 Credits.  

We shall read, in the original Greek, major authors of Greek Literature from the Hellenistic period to the Imperial period.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.420.  Classics Research Lab: The Symonds Project.  3 Credits.  

This course gives participants a unique opportunity to engage directly in empirical research and its interpretation and dissemination. Topics vary. This semester’s offering is organized around a project to reconstruct digitally the library of the nineteenth-century writer John Addington Symonds, author of one of the first studies of ancient sexuality. No prerequisites, but potential students should contact instructor for permission to enroll.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.425.  Classics Research Lab: Ancient Bodies of Modern Baltimore, The Peabody Cast Collection Project.  3 Credits.  

The Peabody Cast Collection (PCC) Classics Research Lab project will revolve around a remarkable collection of plaster casts of classical Greek and Roman sculptures, created ca. 1879 for the Peabody Institute (now part of JHU). Such cast collections were a highly valued cultural resource in Europe and North America during the later 17th to early 20th centuries, produced for major museums, academic institutions and wealthy individuals. Because of the technical process of the cast formation, which is based directly upon the ancient sculptural surface, these collections brought contact with the actual classical artifacts into temporally and spatially distant contexts—including the burgeoning urban center of 19th century Baltimore. The PCC Lab’s initial objective is archival and field research of the cast collection—its content, formation, access and usage by the people of Baltimore and its eventual disbanding and distribution. From this, we will aim to virtually reassemble its member objects, charting their biographies and, when extant, their current locations. This in part will be accomplished digitally, in a virtual reconstruction of the original display contexts of the casts within the Peabody Institute based on early hand-written ledgers, logs, and photographs. With this we will contribute a new open-access chapter to the collection’s biography.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.501.  Independent Study.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.040.502.  Independent Study.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.040.519.  Honors Research.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.040.520.  Honors Research.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.040.599.  Independent Study.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.040.600.  The Archaeology of Cyprus: Investigating a Mediterranean Island World in the JHU Museum.  

This course explores the visual and material worlds of ancient Cyprus from the earliest human evidence through the Iron Age. Class involves regular analysis of artifacts based in the Archaeological Museum.

AS.040.601.  Italian Renaissance Humanism and Modern Humanities.  

This course will reflect on certain key moments in the development of Latinate and Italian Renaissance humanism and will also include reading and discussion of certain recent landmark contributions to the history of the modern humanities.

AS.040.602.  Heliodorus.  

We shall read and discuss the writing of Heliodorus in the original Greek.

AS.040.603.  Homer's Odyssey.  

This seminar proposes an in-depth exploration of Homer's _Odyssey_. One of the monumental epics of ancient Greek and a foundational text of world-literature, the _Odyssey_ examines, through one man's quest to make his way home, profound questions concerning the nature of identity, the meaning of suffering, the importance of sharing stories, and the strange allure of poetry itself. We will study the entire poem in the original Greek in order to gain advanced understanding of its language and style. Emphasis will also be placed on the study of commentaries and scholarship in order to enhance our understanding of the poem's themes, the transmission of the text, and the historical, literary and social contexts in which--and in response to which--it grew.

AS.040.604.  Heliodorus II.  

We will read the second half of Heliodorus' Aethiopica in the original Greek and integrate the reading with secondary literature.

AS.040.605.  Orality and Writing in the Literary Culture of the Early Roman Empire.  

This graduate seminar focuses on the oral practices that constitute “literary culture” in Rome in the first and second centuries CE: declamation, recitation, disputation emerging from reading, and the relationship of these practices to both literary “publication” and to arenas of traditional oratory such as the courts and the Senate. Weekly assignments will include substantial readings in Latin.

AS.040.606.  Topics in Classical Reception.  

An exploration of recurring themes and recent trends in the reception of classical antiquity.

AS.040.607.  Citations.  

This course investigates the use of literary citation in ancient scholarly works, including issues of source and accuracy, as well as notions of literary authority (with focus on the use of digital tools for analysis).

AS.040.608.  Neo-Latin.  

This seminar will introduce participants to the reading, editing, translation, and interpretation of humanist Latin, with training in the ancillary skills of paleography, codicology, and textual criticism.

AS.040.609.  Petronius Satyrica: The First of the Three Troublesome Ancient Latin Novels.  

This seminar explores the topic of Petronius as a historical character in ancient Rome.

AS.040.610.  Biography and the Hero.  

This graduate seminar will involve a close reading and study Plutarch’s Life of Romulus, particularly in relation to the paired Life of Theseus. We will examine Plutarch’s frameworks and principles for “life writing” in general, as well as his understanding and application of the traditional concepts of the Greek “hero” and Roman exemplum, to shed light on his poetics in this mythistorical “biography.”

AS.040.614.  Ancient Allegorical Interpretations of Greek Literature.  

We shall look at several allegorical readings offered in antiquity to interpret myths and literary works, especially, but not only, the epics of Homer.

AS.040.615.  Ovid's Metamorphoses.  

In this seminar, we will study Ovid's Metamorphoses, paying special attention to the text's generic playfulness and the author's poetics of illusion. We will also survey recent critical trends in Ovidian studies.

AS.040.618.  Around the Gracchi: Current Views on Late Republican Culture, Politics, and Economics.  

This seminar explores and appraises the recent revolution in our understanding of the culture, politics, and economics of the late Roman Republic, with a thematic focus on how we now understand the Gracchi as historical actors and as cultural phenomena.

AS.040.623.  Greek Wall Painting.  

This seminar will examine wall painting of the Aegean from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Topics will include crafting, spatial and experiential dynamics, materiality, narrative, iconography and the relationship of the images to their worlds.

AS.040.625.  Classics Research Lab: Ancient Bodies of Modern Baltimore, The Peabody Cast Collection Project.  

The Peabody Cast Collection (PCC) Classics Research Lab project will revolve around a remarkable collection of plaster casts of classical Greek and Roman sculptures, created ca. 1879 for the Peabody Institute (now part of JHU). Such cast collections were a highly valued cultural resource in Europe and North America during the later 17th to early 20th centuries, produced for major museums, academic institutions and wealthy individuals. Because of the technical process of the cast formation, which is based directly upon the ancient sculptural surface, these collections brought contact with the actual classical artifacts into temporally and spatially distant contexts—including the burgeoning urban center of 19th century Baltimore. The PCC Lab’s initial objective is archival and field research of the cast collection—its content, formation, access and usage by the people of Baltimore and its eventual disbanding and distribution. From this, we will aim to virtually reassemble its member objects, charting their biographies and, when extant, their current locations. This in part will be accomplished digitally, in a virtual reconstruction of the original display contexts of the casts within the Peabody Institute based on early hand-written ledgers, logs, and photographs. With this we will contribute a new open-access chapter to the collection’s biography.

AS.040.637.  Competition in the Early Roman Empire.  

A well-documented feature of the middle to late Roman republic is the ferocious competitiveness of the aristocracy, and the governing class in particular. These people competed for prestige and glory on the battlefield, for offices and honors in government and administration, for visibility in public building, in forensic oratory in the courts, in deliberative oratory in various assemblies, and sometimes in literary production. Less well-understood is how the competitiveness of this group manifested itself in the early imperial age, as the emergence of the emperor shut down competition in some of these arenas and fundamentally changed the character of the competition in others. This seminar considers how some old arenas changed under the Imperial regime, and examines new forms that aristocratic competition assumed to make up for the arenas that had altogether disappeared.

AS.040.641.  Reception of the Greek Novel.  

In this course, we will follow the fortunes of the Greek novels from the Byzantine period onward, focusing especially on Heliodorus' _Aethiopica_. Knowledge of Greek is highly desirable but not required.

AS.040.665.  Survey of Greek Literature.  

An intensive survey of Greek poetic and prose texts, which emphasizes reading for comprehension and speed. Texts range from Homer to Lucian.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.702.  Reading Ancient Greek Poetry.  

This reading seminar is intended to train graduate students in direct and critical work on primary sources. Co-listed with AS.040.306.

AS.040.705.  Reading Ancient Greek Prose.  

This reading seminar is intended to train graduate students in direct and critical work on primary sources. Co-listed with AS.040.305. Recommended Course Background: AS.040.205-AS.040.206.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.707.  Reading Latin Prose.  

This reading seminar is intended to train graduate students in direct and critical work on primary sources. Co-listed with AS.040.307.

AS.040.710.  Reading Latin Poetry.  

This reading seminar is intended to train graduate students in direct and critical work on primary sources. Co-listed with AS.040.308. Recommended Course Background: AS.040.207-AS.040.208.

Area: Humanities

AS.040.801.  Independent Study.  
AS.040.802.  Independent Study.  
AS.040.806.  Master's Thesis Research.  
AS.040.807.  Master's Thesis Research.  
AS.040.809.  Exam Preparation.  

Study in preparation for a comprehensive oral exam, required to become a PhD candidate, and consisting of three fields in classics and related areas.

AS.040.810.  Exam Preparation.  

Study in preparation for a comprehensive oral exam, required to become a PhD candidate, and consisting of three fields in classics and related areas

AS.040.814.  Dissertation Research.  

No Audits.

AS.040.815.  Dissertation Research.  

No Audits.