The Young Investigators’ Day was established in 1978 to recognize student investigators who are trained at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and to provide them with a forum for their work.  The awards are intended to recognize research undertaken by applicants while registered as students or postdoctoral fellows at the school of medicine. 

The Johns Hopkins Medical and Surgical Association Awards for Postdoctoral Investigation were established in 1981 by the School of Medicine to recognize excellence in research by clinical or research fellows in the School of Medicine. These six awards are designated for clinical research, laboratory research with direct clinical relevance, and basic laboratory research.  The awards are as follows:

The A. McGehee Harvey Research Award

The Helen B. Taussig Research Award

The Alfred Blalock Research Award

The W. Barry Wood, Jr. Research Award

The Albert L. Lehninger Research Award

The Daniel Nathans Research Award

The Michael A. Shanoff Research Award consisting of an honorarium and a certificate, is made annually to a candidate in the M.D., Ph.D., or M.D.-Ph.D. program in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who, among all similarly eligible students, is considered to have made the most significant research contribution.

The award will be given in recognition of a substantial and sustained contribution to research, preferably undertaken over more than one elective quarter. Thoroughness and originality of research are to be primary considerations in the selection of awardees. Most of the research must have been undertaken during the candidates’ studies at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. The award may be shared by two or more students who have collaborated on a research project. If the award committee finds no meaningful way to distinguish between the relative merit of the contribution and achievement of candidates who have worked on different research projects, then the award may be divided equally between such candidates. The awardee(s) will be selected by a committee comprised of members of the Basic Science and Clinical faculties.

The David Israel Macht Research Award was established in 1982 through an endowment provided by the family of Dr. Macht to commemorate the centenary of his birth. Dr. Macht was a graduate of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Class of 1906 and was a member of the faculty of the Departments of Pharmacology and Medicine from 1910 to the middle 1930’s. He was a versatile and pioneering investigator and had a special interest in opiate alkaloids, the absorption of drugs, and a number of other areas.

The award is intended to recognize excellence in investigation by a student in the School of Medicine, registered in M.D., Ph.D., or combined M.D.-Ph.D programs. The award will consist of an honorarium and a certificate.

The selection of the awardee will be made by a Committee composed of Basic Science and Clinical Faculty members. The award will be awarded annually to a single individual. If, in the opinion of the Committee, no meaningful distinction between the qualities of two essays can be made, the award may be divided among not more than two individuals.

The Martin and Carol Macht Research Award  was established in 1993 to recognize outstanding investigation by an M.D. or Ph.D., or M.D.-Ph.D. student in the School of Medicine. Dr. Martin B. Macht received both M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Johns Hopkins, and was a Trustee of the University for many years.  Dr. Carol Macht received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Johns Hopkins in the History of Art and Archeology. The award was established through an endowment gift from the Macht family. 

The selection of the awardee will be made by a committee composed of basic science and clinical faculty members. The award will be awarded annually to a single individual. If, in the opinion of the Committee, no meaningful distinction between the qualities of two essays can be made, the award may be divided among not more than two individuals. The award consists of an honorarium and certificate.

The Paul Ehrlich Research Awards  are made annually to candidates in the Ph.D., M.D., or Masters programs in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. They are given in recognition of contributions to research undertaken during the candidate’s studies at this institution. The award consists of an honorarium and certificate.

The Alicia Showalter Reynolds Research Award  was created by the School of Medicine Dean’s Office in 1997, to honor the memory of Alicia Showalter Reynolds, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences from 1992 until her untimely death in 1996. It is given in recognition of outstanding research by a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Medicine.  The award consists of an honorarium and certificate.

The Mette Strand Research Award  was established in 1998 by Dr. Strand’s colleagues and friends as a tribute to Dr. Strand, a Professor of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences. This award honors Dr. Strand’s contributions to humanity, her unyielding devotion to science, and her role in training a generation of graduate students. Preference is given to a Ph.D. student.  The award consists of an honorarium and certificate.

The Hans Joaquim Prochaska Research Award was established in 1998 by his mentor and friend Paul Talalay to honor the excellence that Dr. Prochaska exemplified, and the distinction he brought to the Hopkins M.D.-Ph.D. program. This award is given annually to a student in the School of Medicine who has made an outstanding discovery with preference given to an M.D.-Ph.D. candidate.  The award consists of an honorarium and certificate.

The Bae Gyo Jung Research Award was established by an endowment in 2006 by friends and family in memory of Bae Gyo Jung, who was a predoctoral student in the department of Biological Chemistry.  The award consists of an honorarium and certificate.

The Nuper Dinesh Thekdi Research Award was established in 2002 in memory of Nupur Dinesh Thekdi, M.D.-Ph.D. student at Johns Hopkins.  The award consists of an honorarium and certificate.

The David Yue Research Award was established in 2015 in memory of Dr. David Yue, who was a Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Neuroscience.  The award consists of an honorarium and certificate.

The Paul Talalay Research Award was established in 2017 to honor Dr. Paul Talalay, who is a Professor of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences and 41 years ago started the Young Investigators' Day Program.  The award consists of an honorarium and certificate.

The Physician Scientist Research Award was established in 2018 to recognize the outstanding research contributions by a Physician Scientist at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.  This award is supported by the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Physician Scientist Training Program.  The award consists of an honorarium and certificate.