AS.070.109.  Introduction to Environmental Anthropology.  3 Credits.  

What is an “environment,” socially speaking? How have pipelines, animals, conservation, and capitalism shaped the way we talk about “nature” and “society” in the present day? This course examines the mutual transformation of humans and their environments through ethnography, environmental history, cultural and political ecology, human geography, and social theory.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.113.  Freshman Seminar:.  2 Credits.  

Various Topics

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.124.  Freshman Seminar Anthropology.  3 Credits.  

Freshman Seminar in Anthropology will cover a wide variety of topics. This course is intended for freshman only and is meant as a broad survey course. Topics are approved by the department and dean's office, and may change frequently. Each section will be a unique topic. To learn more about each topic, view the section description found in class search.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.125.  Technology and Politics in Native North America.  3 Credits.  

How have biodiversity protection measures, cultural heritage NGOs, genomic science, and transnational media altered the lives of Indigenous groups in North America in the twenty-first century? What does "recognition" mean for these people, and how does it actually work in practice? This course will explore the emergence of new spaces and technologies of Indigenous politics and their new roles in shaping everyday experiences, from Inuit communities in Arctic Canada to urban centers in the United States.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.126.  Photography in Anthropology.  3 Credits.  

We will examine historical uses of photographs, critiques of them and more recent creative uptakes of photography in anthropology. We will learn from the use of photographs by anthropologists in the Hopkins department. We will also undertake independent projects. Students will learn to critically engage and mobilize images through the history of its use in anthropology.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.132.  Invitation to Anthropology.  3 Credits.  

Click. The screen that brings you last night’s Instagrams and celebrity gossip also flashes glimpses of melting icecaps and burning rubble. These are complex times for human beings, both exciting and unsettling. This course introduces anthropology as a way of reflecting on the challenges of contemporary life around the globe, focusing on themes such as migration, warfare, ecology, inequality, and addiction.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.135.  Freshman Seminar: Human Nature Under Capitalism.  3 Credits.  

Think about the wide range of lives people lead today. Financial traders, stay-at-home parents, tech entrepreneurs, slum dwellers, corporate office drones, migrant workers, indebted college students. Our identities, aspirations, and anxieties are reflections of a capitalist system that has always relied on claims to what it means to be human. In this course we treat capitalism not as an abstraction for political debate but as a social force shaping the human lives and the planet. Departing from a conception of human nature not as fixed and universal but as formed by the totality of social relations, we explore how capital shapes human needs, desires, and relations to each other and the world.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.140.  Anthropology of Food.  3 Credits.  

This introductory course investigates what we eat and, as a consequence, who we are. By taking a cross-cultural perspective, students will examine the politics of food production, the values associated with food preparation, and the material and social dynamics of food consumption. Through readings, films, field trips, demonstrations, and tastings, the course offers an interdisciplinary and dynamic pedagogical approach to analyzing cooking and eating—activities central to daily life and social forms more broadly. Local- and global-level issues will be addressed as students explore histories, economics, social issues, and identity formation related to food.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.143.  Anthropology of Markets.  3 Credits.  

Capitalism is built on social and cultural processes. In this course, we explore the culture of capitalism across diverse settings — a fish market in Tokyo, an investment bank in Wall Street, and the organ donation economy in China, among many others. We ask what motivates the makers of markets today, as well as their critics.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.145.  Freshman Seminar: The Idea of America.  3 Credits.  

This course takes an anthropological look at the idea of America and everyday American life. Relying on ethnographic studies, selected works of popular writing, as well as films and fiction, we will explore themes such as settlement and displacement, aspiration and advancement, racial and cultural difference.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.154.  Maps and Mapping.  3 Credits.  

This course explores maps as cultural documents and ethnographic sites. Students will learn how cultural understandings of space, time, and the visible world shape cartographic conventions. Through mapping exercises we will explore how ethnographer can use maps to theorize the nature of political, cultural, and economic life.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.204.  An introduction to Islamic Intellectual History.  3 Credits.  

This course will study the vibrant world of the Seljuks, an Islamic empire that flourished between 1037 and 1157 AD, from Khorasan across Baghdad to Hijaz and Anatolia. As an exploration in intellectual history, we will attempt to understand the social world of the Seljuk Turks through political, religious, and literary texts. We will first read a political treatise, Siyasatnama (The Book of Government), written by Nizam al-Mulk (1018-1092), the formidable minister of the Seljuk Empire, who oversaw the reign of three successive sultans during the second half of the eleventh century and created a strong bureaucratic state for the Seljuks. During his administration, he commissioned the development of madrasas, colleges dedicated to the teaching of Islamic law, theology, literature, and history. The most famous of these madrasas was the Baghdad Nizamiyya where Al-Ghazali (1058-1111) taught from 1190 and 1194. We will read Al-Ghazali’s Deliverance from Error in order to explore the state of religious learning at the peak of the Islamic Golden Age. Having discussed the political and religious foundations of Islamic orthodoxy in the eleventh century, next we turn to the rise of heterodox movements that challenged the authority of the Seljuk state. We will briefly examine the history of the Ismaili branch of Shia Islam, focusing on the politico-religious ideas of its most potent representative, Hassan-i Sabbah (1050s-1124). Finally, we will end our class with the Rubaiyyat of Omar Khayyam (1048-1131), the prominent poet and polymath of the eleventh century.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.205.  Post-Soviet Russia: An Anthropological Perspective.  3 Credits.  

This course is designed to introduce students to anthropology’s contribution to ongoing conversations about Russia’s political and economic system, social life, as well as Russia’s place in the world since the fall of the Soviet Union. Students will be encouraged to think beyond easy distinctions between socialism and post-socialism, Putin’s Russia and the West, often starkly and unreflexively established by commentators and in the media. Topics will include post-socialist transition, memory, violence and war, gender and sexuality.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.207.  Resilience and its Critics: Change in Environment and Society.  3 Credits.  

Resilience – the idea that environmental systems and social forms can be designed to “bounce back” from disasters and other disruptive changes – has influenced a rapidly growing range of sustainability policies, urban planning strategies, and academic disciplines. In some areas, though, the term signifies neoliberal reform and a shrinking state. This course will trace debates over the many practical and theoretical meanings of resilience, from its origins in military planning and security to its ambivalent connotations for climate change science and disaster preparedness.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.209.  Urban CItizenship in Latin America.  3 Credits.  

Latin American cities are among the largest in the world, but also among the most unequal. Significant proportions of the urban populations reside informally on the fringes of metropolitan areas without access to services or amenities, secure tenure, or adequate sanitary conditions. This course will study several ethnographies to examine the intricacies of the notion of "urban citizenship” and how the "right to the city" has been imagined, demanded and struggled for in Latin American cities. Cases will include Sao Paulo in Brazil, El Alto in Bolivia, or Bogota in Colombia.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.210.  Trauma: institutions, violence, and everyday life.  3 Credits.  

How are catastrophe and forms of everyday violence responded to in the clinic, law, in publicity, and in the domestic? In this course, we ask how trauma discourse has transformed institutional responses to violence. We will engage such issues as humanitarian intervention, rape and the law, the use of trigger warnings on college campuses, the clinical description of trauma and its treatment. Through ethnography, fiction, and film, we explore how the subjective experience of violence moves beyond and pushes the limits of institutional discourses on trauma.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.212.  Minorites in South Asia.  3 Credits.  

This course will introduce first-year students to the anthropology of modern South Asia from the lens of its varied minorities. We will interrogate ideas of nation, community, tradition, and belonging across the region to understand contemporary dilemmas of diversity, heterogeneity, and cultural citizenship.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.213.  Data and Society.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the context, experience, and consequences of data proliferation in the contemporary moment. Both experts and laypeople generate and study data at unprecedented rates to make decisions, communicate with each other, and process their environments. How do data advance or constrain our social, political, and economic relationships at large? How is knowledge transformed when it is mediated by large volumes of data? What are the consequences of trusting sociopolitical decisions to data-processing algorithms? What happens when everyday users generate data about themselves and volunteer their data to for-profit entities? The course consists of different modules zeroing in on topics ranging from the economy, to public health, climate change, media, and the law. Each module consists of lectures and seminar-type discussions, as well as interactions with invited speakers. Students will be expected to actively participate in all discussions and develop one independent project. The course content and activities tie into the 2019-2021 Sawyer Seminar on “Precision and Uncertainty in a World of Data” led by the Departments of Anthropology and the History of Medicine.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.214.  Politics and Poetics of Mobility in Africa.  3 Credits.  

This course considers a broad survey of contemporary themes in African mobility, displacement, and re-settlement. Drawing on historical, anthropological, and literary texts and film, the course uses mobility as a window into a range of topics that are of scholarly interest in contemporary African studies: from urbanization and labor, to violence, political subjectivity and the changing nature of the state, formal and informal economy, gender and domesticity, and religious movements.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.221.  Freshman Seminar: Urban Citizenship.  3 Credits.  

In our present "urban age," the city appears as the privileged framework to claim citizenship rights. This demand, however, clashes with issues of urban renewal and development, security and circulation, as well as conditions of stark inequality that relegate vast sectors of the urban population around the globe to informality and precarious residence, without access to adequate healthcare, sanitary services and amenities, or secure housing tenure. This course examines the intricacies of the notion of "urban citizenship" and how the "right to the city" is imagined and demanded in struggles for belonging and inclusion in cities throughout the world.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.226.  Chemical Pollution and Social Life.  3 Credits.  

The present is marked by a ubiquitous exposure to different sorts of toxic chemicals: from disasters that affect entire communities to the built environments in which we live and work, from the traces of pesticides in our food to the worldwide disrupting effects of oil production. Drawing from social theory, ethnography, environmental history, policy documents, newspaper articles, commercial ads, and documentaries, this course will introduce anthropology as a way of thinking through the interactions between processes of chemical pollution and social worlds.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.228.  Photography and Writing: Crafting an Anthroplogical Text.  3 Credits.  

This course explores resonances between photography and anthropological writing. Students will be introduced to basic techniques in photographic composition. How do photography and anthropology share techniques of rendering people, places, and things? Other topics include the role of sensation, reflection, and creativity in depicting a scene, as well as care and ethics. Students will develop an individual project that folds photographic sensibilities into the writing process.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.230.  From Jihad to Revolution: The Political Struggles of Women in the Middle East.  3 Credits.  

The course explores the role of women as political prisoners, combatants and activists in the modern history of the Middle East using a multidisciplinary approach. It explores the history of women’s engagement in political struggles in the Middle East over the long durée starting with anti-colonial movements in the 20th century up until the recent uprisings known as the “Arab Spring”. The course is geared towards the examination of the ways in which politics, in a broad sense, is gendered in the Middle East by examining how the social and political construction of women as political subjects influence the nature and practice of political life, as well as the ways in which sexual difference has served as a basis for social and political organization.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.233.  Africa as Laboratory.  3 Credits.  

Africa, as anthropologists have noted, has long been a “laboratory of the future.” By tracing the intersections of technology and politics, this class considers the various experiments in oppression and liberation that have unfolded within it. Following a broad historical arc, we begin with colonial medicine, racial science, and urban planning; move to national infrastructures and postcolonial resource extractions; and finally consider contemporary African engagements with consumer technology.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.235.  Anthropology of Christianity.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces students to the study of Christianity from the Anthropological perspective. Among the themes discussed are: Christian conversion, theology, practice, and knowledge in a range of national contexts. The course considers broad trends in global Christianity, including the retreat of traditional Catholicism and the surge of charismatic forms of Christianity, such as Pentecostalism and Charismatic Catholicism.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.237.  Conflict and Environment.  3 Credits.  

How do conflicts in and over environments shape our understandings of identity and belonging? Violence, resource loss, and resettlement may shape landscapes through physical infrastructures or sites of extraction, but they also live on in memory, art, and other social practices. From the fencing of the American west to attempts to save Andean glaciers through the legal recognition of “earth beings,” this course examines the many ways environments and conflict co-shape one another.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.241.  African Cities.  3 Credits.  

Over the past two decades, African cities have absorbed rapid population increase without accompanying economic growth. Students will review the major challenges of this mode of urbanization and explore the vibrant ways residents have sought to meet them. Following anthropology’s commitment to lived experience, we will track these issues through the twists and turns of everyday life, and consider what they may say about urbanity more broadly in the 21st century. Topics include livelihood, the built environment, conflict and membership, and popular culture.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.249.  Latin American Cities: Public Spaces and Private Lives.  3 Credits.  

This course will explore the relationship between public space and forms of political expression as well as the cultural implications of various senses of privacy and domesticity in contemporary Latin American cities. Drawing on recent anthropological and historical texts, we will study the formation of urban public space in the region, as well as its use and representation by different social, political and ethnic groups.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.251.  Aliens, iPads, and Neurotribes: An Introduction to the Anthropology of Autism.  3 Credits.  

This course is an overview of the emerging anthropology of autism. It surveys the history of the autism diagnosis -- from its original formulation at Johns Hopkins in 1943 to its rapid expansion into a "spectrum" condition in the late 1990s -- and the ways in which social scientists of different disciplines have tried to analyze the role of social and cultural factors in its evolution. The course also looks at a range of ethnographic studies that have asked what it means be autistic in today's world.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.253.  Introduction to Medical Anthropology.  3 Credits.  

Is illness bound within an individual body, or is it entangled with our relations? What are the ethics and politics of the doctor/patient relation? How are medical technologies changing the way we experience illness and healing? How have global institutions responded to the problems posed by disease and development? Drawing on ethnography, film, and literature, this course introduces students to how anthropologists have explored and researched problems related to health and illness.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.267.  Culture, Religion and Politics in Iran.  3 Credits.  

This is an introductory course for those interseted in gaining basic knowledge about contemporary Iran. The focus will be on culture and religion and the ways they in which they become interwoven into different kinds of political stakes.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.268.  Police in Ethnographic Perspective.  3 Credits.  

This course examines policing throughout history and across the world. Course readings will provide an empirical account of the many diverse forms of police and the issues associated with them.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.273.  Ethnographies.  3 Credits.  

What does it mean to translate the field onto the page? This course explores the craft of ethnography and its relationship to anthropological knowledge. Reading a series of classic and contemporary works, and engaging in our own writing experiments, we attend to the knotty problem of rendering lived experience, attending to narrative, voice, structure, and the relationship between description and analysis.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.292.  Landscape and Power.  3 Credits.  

How does the production and public interpretation of maps, photographs, and other visual media shape struggles over resources, political power, and public health? Surveying approaches from political ecology and environmental history, this course will expose students to a range of ethnographic strategies for analyzing media amidst environmental conflicts.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.295.  Conflict and Security in a Global World.  3 Credits.  

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.296.  Introduction to Migration Studies.  3 Credits.  

How can we understand the city from positions of marginality and risk? What challenges does urban living pose to its most vulnerable residents? We will examine these questions, and methodological and conceptual issues they raise, with anthropological research from five cities: Johannesburg, São Paulo, Ibadan, New York, Kuala Lumpur. We will explore each city from the perspective of particular residents and the specific struggles they face, including crime and security, economic uncertainty, and sexual discrimination.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.297.  Medicine, Sports, and Culture.  1 Credit.  

This course examines how medicine is practiced in different cultures around the world. In particular, we draw on theories and concepts from medical anthropology to study how these differences reveal alternative perspectives on the body, its health and its capabilities. To sharpen our inquiries into cultural differences surrounding bodily health, we look comparatively at the anthropology of sports and bodily performance. In looking at how concepts including illness, wellness, and injury differ across cultures, we consider, for example, how the bodily experience of pain not only varies according to societal beliefs and behaviors, but also changes as one pursues the limits of athletic performance. In addition to introducing how cultural anthropology engages with medicine and sports performance, this course enriches scientific interest in medicine by teaching students techniques of critical reasoning that powerfully investigate both how medicine is practiced and the cultural phenomenon of bodily health.Prior study in anthropology is not required. We anticipate talks from two current medical residents who were undergraduate majors in anthropology, a high-level athlete, and a field trip to speak with physicians at the Maryland Medical Center.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.298.  The Family at War: Crisis & Ambivalence in the Study of Kinship.  3 Credits.  

This course will introduce students to one of the foundational concerns of anthropology and bring to the fore critiques that bear upon what it means to relate to one another. Students will be introduced to theories of kinship and the myriad challenges to fixed notions of the family. Specifically, course readings will consider interventions in anthropological studies of kinship, such as in studies of new reproductive technologies and queer kinship. In addition, course readings will consider the notion of the family in colonial and “post”-colonial contexts, as well as in “post”-conflict societies. A primary concern of the course will also be to encourage students to think critically about the ways in which knowledge is produced, institutionalized, and disseminated.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.299.  From Palestine to the Pipeline: Land, Property, and Indigenous Politics.  3 Credits.  

What are the ideas, histories, and forces that set the conditions of possibility and foreclosure of indigenous politics today? We will explore this question through then lens of property through readings from anthropology, political theory, history, and geography. As is well known, control over land (and its resources) has historically constituted the core of the struggle between settler and native. Within settler colonies, however, land is governed and regulated as property by the settler state. As such, the imagining, making, regulating, and exchanging of property all have important implications for indigenous territory and sovereignty. Focusing on North America, Australia, and Israel/Palestine, this course considers the following questions: how did ideas about rights and ownership develop in settler colonies in relation to the native inhabitants? How did these ideas shape market relations, regulations, and property law? And how does indigenous land struggle navigate the constraints and possibilities of property in the struggle for territory?

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.300.  The Global Artwork.  3 Credits.  

This course is about art practice in a postcolonial context, where the techniques and pictorial concepts formed by a European history of art are confronted by other traditions of representation, beset by different kinds of political struggles, and posed against the background of religious traditions other than that of Christianity. What problems of history, difference and the self arise in this context, and what forms of art practice emerge to address these problems? In what ways do these forms of art practice draw upon religious traditions, and how do we think about the displacement of religious traditions in modern art? In this course, we will explore these questions by examining the modern art of the Middle East, South Asia, and China, in conjunction with readings from anthropology, art history, comparative literature, philosophy and religious studies.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.302.  Crisis and Futurity: New Ethnographies of Africa.  3 Credits.  

"Africa Rising" or "The Hopeless Continent?" Within the span of a decade, The Economist magazine famously declared each to be true. In this class we turn to the genre of ethnography, with its focus on lived experience and critical nuance, to make sense of this seeming contradiction. We explore the themes of crisis and futurity through new works by Mbembe, De Boeck, Obarrio, and others.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.314.  Activism and Assembly, Local and Global Connections.  3 Credits.  

This course offers an anthropological perspective on political mobilization and struggles for social change and citizenship rights in several regions of the world. It charts collective action among the urban poor, indigenous peoples, queer rights activists, feminists, environmentalists and grassroots groups in various cultural and political contexts, to examine methodologies, representations, and local and global networks.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.317.  Methods.  3 Credits.  

This course aims to teach basic fieldwork skills: Choosing and entering a community; establishing contacts; learning to listen and to ask questions and locating archival material that might be relevant. It is a hands-on course that increases student familiarity with various neighborhoods such as the Arts District in Baltimore. Recommended Course Background: two or more prior courses in anthropology (not cross-listed courses). Course is a requirement for anthropology major.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.318.  The Atlantic World.  3 Credits.  

This seminar explores the formation of the South Atlantic through a reading of historical and ethnographic texts. We examine the making of history and culture as contentious fields of struggle

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.329.  An Introduction to Reality.  3 Credits.  

Reality is a key concept we often think with more than we think about. And yet reality is not a self-evident thing. This seminar explores a central paradox in the concept of reality: as a totality—an ‘everything’—nonetheless produced and maintained from a partial and situated practice of making. The course begins with historical examinations of reality-making and -undoing then proceeds to approaches from anthropological theory and ethnography. It looks critically at the role of scientific knowledge, technological development, and capitalist and socialist ideological regimes in making realities in their own image. The course puts forth the case that anthropology is uniquely situated to understand how systems of knowledge come into being and stabilize a social order while investigating the inherent contestability and fragility of those systems.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.333.  Theologies of Political Life.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the relationship between modern political forms and theological traditions. Looking at developments both in the West and the postcolonial world, we will examine the multiple ways in which theological traditions have continued to inform how political life is conceived and pursued. In particular, we will focus on the relation between liberalism and the Christian tradition; the turn to messianism in critical theory; the transformation of the shari?a into a legal form; and its imbrication in anti-colonial politics

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.334.  Contemporary Anthropology.  1 Credit.  

Students are invited to attend, for credit, the departmental research colloquium in anthropology. The colloquium meets most (but not all) Tuesday afternoons during the semester. Students are expected to attend and listen, encouraged to ask questions when they wish, and to write one brief reflection on contemporary trends in the field, based on what they have observed during these sessions. Prerequisite: Students must have completed one Anthropology course previously.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.336.  Enthnographic Perspectives on Brazil.  3 Credits.  

This seminar offers an examination of Brazilian culture and politics through close readings of classic and contemporary ethnography. The course will track how anthropologists have approached the complexities and contradictions of Brazilian society. And, conversely, we investigate how studies in Brazil have prompted challenges to and generated innovations in anthropological thought.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.340.  The Elementary Forms of American Religous Life.  3 Credits.  

In the United States, the nation that in its infancy so famously erected a “wall between Church and State,” religion remains a persistent, and insistently public concern today, occupying our literary imagination, filling dockets and riding the national airwaves. Far from dropping out of a rapidly secularizing public sphere, specific forms of religious life have become deeply embedded in America, while the nation has also impressed its own particular institutional character upon religious expression. This course takes an anthropological lens to the particularity of American forms of religious life, asking what claims they make on the liberal subject, and through what enduring institutional forms and channels.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.343.  On Seeing: Between Religion and Art.  3 Credits.  

This course reflects on what it is to see, by examining how different religious traditions have conceived of seeing, and then considering how seeing is organized by modern forms of art practice. Our inquiry will range across a variety of cases—from devotional practices in Christianity and Hinduism; to concepts of vision in the Islamic tradition; to the critique of images during the Protestant Reformation and the legacy of that critique in modernism; and to the development of new technologies like photography and film—and it will draw on readings from anthropology, art history, critical theory and religious studies.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.359.  Korean War.  3 Credits.  

This course takes the Korean War as a site to both explore: 1) contemporary historical and political transformations in East Asia and globally and 2) the ways in which violence, catastrophic loss, and separation are woven into everyday life. It will explore the Korean War through film, fiction, historiography, and draw on comparative materials in anthropology

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.363.  Religious Freedom and Prisons in America.  3 Credits.  

"Although we often think of religious freedom as a fixed philosophical doctrine of Enlightenment liberalism, it is a concept continually being (re)made from the ground up in increasingly important ways that today affect national politics and the judiciary. Nowadays, religious freedom has cultivated oppositional meanings: it holds together both a freedom from and to supersede government regulation; where actions in the name of religious freedom seek both to separate from government and to radically engage it as a theological force. We begin by taking this tension as a provocation to look locally and draw widely from a variety of ethnographic, historical, philosophical, literary, and other present-day texts and media, which will deepen how we understand the significant scope of what is at play and at stake in contemporary America and its politics. Through our readings and discussions, we will better grasp how religious freedom and its legal interpretations have grown from the bottom up, moving through local policies, social geographies and institutions, such as churches and prisons, as much as through any singular adherence to transcendent philosophical doctrine. While this class is an overarching exploration of how American Christianity has developed, it will pay particular attention to the Alabama and Louisiana prison systems and their distinctive religious histories. And we will focus on how the varied conceptual forms of religious freedom relate to the social geographies, religious discourses, literary texts, and media produced in and through ideas of the American South."

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.366.  Speculative Anthropology.  3 Credits.  

Anthropology has always been a speculative enterprise, an attempt to think beyond some familiar idea of the human. We will explore this speculative dimension by looking at crossovers between anthropology and contemporary art, science fiction, philosophy, and environmental politics. Working with texts, films, drawings and other media, we will examine the experimental and imaginative nature of anthropology.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.372.  Religion and Media.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the ways in which conventional and non-conventional media recreate or transform religious experience in modern life. Increasingly, religion is experienced not only in sacred spaces and as ritual prescriptions, but also through the information that is disseminated through radio, TV, and the Internet, as well as in consumer culture and political speeches. Beginning with this proposition that our ideas about religion are shaped not only by historical and scriptural legacies, but as well as by material practices and other sundry conditions of mediation, of which our present times supply many, we will reexamines how questions of revelation, belief, spirituality, ethereality, and ritual practice are constituted by these irreducible ways, thus complicating the neat separation of religion and secularism, or, for that matter, religion and culture.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.373.  Housing Matters.  3 Credits.  

This course will collectively craft an anthropological critique of housing, both as a social concern and as an object of public policy and urban planning. As a key component of the structure and functioning of cities, housing is instrumental to urban governance, segregation, and citizenship, as well as to cultures of consumption and class formation, identities, solidarities and the imagination of alternative social orders. We will study several ethnographies to examine how the material and social effects of housing shape the politics of difference, rights, markets and property relations, consumption and activism in the US urban context.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.374.  What Does it Mean to be Religious?.  3 Credits.  

What do we mean when we say that something or someone is “religious?” We unpack this question in a comparative approach, and pay special attention to the ways in which this term has been applied to the study of Islamic cultures and Muslim experience. Through an exploration of the categories of experience, creativity and the individual, we offer a more capacious way of imagining what it means to be religious.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.375.  Technology, Trust, and Expertise.  3 Credits.  

How does an idea or an observation become a “fact”? How does one study "science” anthropologically? This course will introduce students to the field of science and technology studies (STS) by asking how different societies have defined the relationship between experimentation, knowledge, and power. Through ethnographic portraits of laboratories, clinics, toxic landscapes, and virtual simulations, we will explore how scientists and other experts have understood their relationships with other citizens, the state, and the physical environment.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.376.  Social Ecology.  3 Credits.  

This course will explore social and cultural dimensions of contemporary ecological problems, thinking between ecological anthropology, environmental philosophy, and activist literature and media. It will be taught as a community-based learning course in partnership with the Center for Social Concern and a Baltimore environmental organization. Coursework will be organized on a collaborative studio basis and a project-based approach.Recommended Course Background: One prior course in either Anthropology or Environmental Studies.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.379.  Social Ecology Studio.  3 Credits.  

This course will grapple with the social and cultural dimensions of contemporary ecological problems through a local, project-based approach. Coursework will be organized on a studio basis in partnership with a local environmental organization, Friends of Stony Run. Continuing a collaborative project initiated in the fall of 2019, we will work together to develop interpretive materials for the Stony Run stream and urban watershed adjoining our campus.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.380.  Slumworld: Life in informal Settlements.  3 Credits.  

One quarter of the planet's urban population lives today in slums, shantytowns, favelas, chawls, colonias and other forms of rudimentary settlements (according to UN Habitat). Despite their prevalence throughout the world, these places are still depicted as spaces of informality and abjection, rather than as sites of emergence ofinnovative -even if disadvantaged-, makeshift ways of producing the city. This course will combine ethnographic and geographical literature, as well as works of fiction and film to explore the lives of squatters and slum-dwellers in many regions of the world and examine in what way their practices, forms of dwelling, sociality, conflict and cooperation are constitutive of the urban experience.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.388.  Anthropology of the Biosciences.  3 Credits.  

What is life? How do scientists shape and define this crucial concept, and for what uses? This course uses historical and anthropological accounts of the biological sciences to ask how the study of life is changing interactions with the world around and within us. In it, we will examine studies of synthetic biology, genetic engineering, genomics, biotechnology, biodiversity conservation, bioprospecting, medical biology, and artificial life. Guiding themes explore fundamental questions about biopower, biocapital, planetary change, bodies, and the nature of “life.” The course takes a global approach to the study of biology, including studies of bioscience and technology from the global South.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.389.  Precarity in South Korea through TV and Film:Aesthetics and everyday life.  3 Credits.  

This seminar explores how precarity in South Korea gains expression in the medium of TV and film. In particular, this seminar will focus on how the moving image brings the viewer into the texture of everyday life. We will focus on the TV show Misaeng and include films such as Parasite and Burning. TV and film will be paired with readings on the transformations of intimate life in contemporary South Korea and comparative work on precarity.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.405.  Urban Ecologies.  3 Credits.  

Description: This course will explore the city from the vantage point of nature/culture relations and political imagination. It will engage a range of topics including the built environment, urban infrastructure, (de)industrialization and the ways in which urban space shapes and is shaped by power relations, racial dynamics, housing markets, domesticity and the body. As part of the coursework, students will carry out small guided research projects in Baltimore City.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.407.  Design Anthropology.  3 Credits.  

From casinos to canoes, algorithms to animal traps, our worlds are bursting with intentional objects. The word design has come to evoke the prestige of such objects, and their power to shape our collective habits and sensations. This course explores the anthropology of designed artifacts and their complex social trajectories. Beginning with philosophical investigations into the relationship between materials, form, and craft, we will proceed through ethnographic case studies of design as expert discourse and ordinary practice. Ultimately we will consider the affinities between the ethnography and design as open-ended and not entirely predictable engagements with the world.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.413.  Reading Marx.  3 Credits.  

This seminar offers a close reading of selected works of Karl Marx, along with supplemental secondary literature. We will explore how the central pillars of Marx’s thought--including dialectical materialism, critical political economy, and utopian socialist thought—shape his critical method in interrogating the logic of capital.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.419.  Logic of Anthropological Inquiry.  3 Credits.  

Anthropology is an endeavor to think with the empirical richness of the world at hand, a field science with both literary and philosophical pretensions. This course grapples with the nature of anthropological inquiry, reading classic works in the discipline as well as contemporary efforts to reimagine its foundations. Required for anthropology majors.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.423.  Anthropology of Poetry and Prayer.  3 Credits.  

What kind of activity is prayer? Are we talking to God(s), to our ancestors, to ourselves? What are the differences between choosing our own words and repeating the words of an established prayer? The course will explore these and similar questions with particular attention to the language of prayers across a number of religious traditions.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.424.  Normal and Pathological.  3 Credits.  

This seminar explores the shifting lines of the normal and the pathological and the constitution of disease in the complex of medicine, public health, and the social. Readings include the works of Canguilhem and Foucault, historical monographs and ethnographies. Students will have the opportunity to develop substantial research or review papers throughout the course of the seminar.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.425.  Anthropology of Epidemics.  3 Credits.  

In this course we will examine how forms of governance, politics, expert knowledge, and citizen actions are implicated in the emergence and management of epidemics.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.426.  Kinship: Old and New.  3 Credits.  

We wil track the transformations in kinship theory in relation to wider changes in legal theory, biomedicine, and the relation between state and family. In particular we will ask how the concepts of sovereignty, gift, exchange, human and non-human milieus affect notions of relations.Co-listed with AS.070.639

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.433.  Sustainable Design.  3 Credits.  

Sustainable design involves the development of socially engaging and ecologically sensitive interventions and alternatives, a task both social and technical in nature. Through interdisciplinary readings and collaborative workshops in social science, environmental engineering, and planning and design, this seminar focuses on both theoretical and practical dimensions of this challenge. The first of a two-course sequence, to be followed by a studio practicum in the spring semester.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.436.  Vulnerability.  3 Credits.  

Many in the contemporary world live in states of acute vulnerability. In this course, we will look closely at situations like forced displacement, experience of poverty and injury, environmental devastation, and the politics of social protest. Thinking with ethnography, feminist philosophy, fiction, and film, we will explore whether vulnerability may be taken as a condition to live with rather than one to overcome at any cost.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.465.  Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic Texts.  3 Credits.  

What is the nature of anthropological concepts and what relations do they bear to concepts internal to a society? We invite students to think with key ideas from Hindu and Islamic traditions, asking if anthropological concepts are best seen as abstractions from the particular or as intertwined with ongoing lines of inquiry, say into the nature of the real and continual efforts to test it? Topics in ritual theory, grammar, aesthetics, translation, revelation, luminosity, figuration and the mythological among those to be considered.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.473.  Readings of Foucault.  3 Credits.  

We will do a close reading of selected texts of Foucault to track the concepts of power, subjectivity, government, and care of the self.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.485.  About Time.  3 Credits.  

This course will explore time from an anthropological perspective.What is time? An object, a dimension, a sensation? Can we “have” time? What is the relation between power and the control of time? Through readings and discussions of classical and current anthropological theories and ethnographies, we will analyze the meaning, experience and textures of time in different cultural settings. Case studies will explore the US, the West and the Global South, with special emphasis on conceptions of the future: expectations, anticipations, preemption, emergence, possibility. We will study imaginations of temporality and futurity in relation to fields such as politics, custom, finance, security, labor, climate change and so on, looking into the role that emotions play in relation to time.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.493.  Precarity.  3 Credits.  

How do we understand and engage precariousness and vulnerability in the contemporary world? This seminar explores the notion of precarity in anthropology and social theory. We will explore this notion genealogically asking such questions as: what are the forms of politics arising in relation to new transformations of labor? What are the regional debates in which the notion of precarity has arisen? We will then explore how anthropology has responded to ongoing destruction of whole forms of life, through war, settler colonialism, displacement, and poverty.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.495.  Householding on a Warming Earth.  3 Credits.  

The household appears as commonsensical to us. It is where people, most often those of a family, reside together, sharing its resources, labor and collective fate. However, anthropologists have been arguing against this commonsense since it emerged in the 1950s. Yet the household is back again in climate change policy discussions as being most vulnerable to the problems associated with climate change, such as, temperature extremes, food insecurity, exacerbated disease, enhanced competition and violence. How might anthropological debates and controversies relating to households and householding as an activity within the context of war, famine and migration, provide important insights into today’s urgencies?

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.503.  Independent Study.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.504.  Independent Study.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.505.  Directed Research-Fall.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.506.  Directed Research.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.507.  Directed Readings.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.508.  Directed Readings.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.551.  Internship-Fall.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.552.  Internship - Spring.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.561.  Senior Essay-Fall.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.562.  Senior Essay - Spring.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.594.  Internship-Anthropology.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.595.  Directed Research.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.596.  Independent Study.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.070.613.  Reading Marx.  

This seminar offers a close reading of selected works of Karl Marx, along with supplemental secondary literature. We will explore how the central pillars of Marx’s thought--including dialectical materialism, critical political economy, and utopian socialist thought—shape his critical method in interrogating the logic of capital.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.616.  Proseminar.  

This course will consist of close reading of anthropological and philosophical texts to tracesome important aspects of the underlying presuppositions of social theory. We will try to see how regions generate both data and theory; and also see how some abiding concerns around the relation between structural formations and formations of subjects are expressed in classical and current anthropological thought.

AS.070.617.  Methods.  

The seminar will offer a forum for students to reflect on preliminary field research and think further about problems of ethnographic method. We will proceed in the manner of a workshop for ongoing projects. Open to anthropology graduate students only.

AS.070.620.  Space and Place.  

This course explores how concepts of emplacement, location, space, place, and belonging shape--and are shaped by--cultural formations and political imaginations. Readings and class discussions include ethnographies and theoretical texts on planning and struggles over territory, aspirations regarding land and the environment, nature/culture distinctions, housing and the right to the city by authors such as Lefebvre, Massey, Harvey, Foucault, Ingold, Virilio, Bachelard, Tsing, Escobar, and others

AS.070.623.  Anthropology of Poetry and Prayer.  

What kind of activity is prayer? Are we talking to God(s), to our ancestors, to ourselves? What are the differences between choosing our own words and repeating the words of an established prayer? The course will explore these and similar questions with particular attention to the language of prayers across a number of religious traditions.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.624.  Normal and Pathological.  

This seminar explores the shifting lines of the normal and the pathological and the constitution of disease in the complex of medicine, public health, and the social. Readings include the works of Canguilhem and Foucault, historical monographs and ethnographies. Students will have the opportunity to develop substantial research or review papers throughout the course of the seminar.

Writing Intensive

AS.070.625.  Anthropology of Epidemics.  

In this course we will examine how forms of governance, politics, expert knowledge, and citizen actions are implicated in the emergence and management of epidemics.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.633.  Sustainable Design.  

Sustainable design involves the development of socially engaging and ecologically sensitive interventions and alternatives, a task both social and technical in nature. Through interdisciplinary readings and collaborative workshops in social science, environmental engineering, and planning and design, this seminar focuses on both theoretical and practical dimensions of this challenge. The first of a two-course sequence, to be followed by a studio practicum in the spring semester.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.634.  The End of Nature?.  

The End of Nature? We have been hearing critiques of the concept of nature as too pristine since at least Donna Haraway's Cyborg Manifesto and Bruno Latour's We Have Never Been Modern. The call has been for a mode of ecological thinking without the encumbrance of nature. Through an examination of some of the tracks that nature has left within the anthropological archives and kindred debates within philosophy, this course attempts a revivification of nature for our present. Readings include Mauss, Rappaport, Levi-Strauss, Bateson, Emerson and Whitehead.

AS.070.636.  Vulnerability.  

Many in the contemporary world live in states of acute vulnerability. In this course, we will look closely at situations like forced displacement, experience of poverty and injury, environmental devastation, and the politics of social protest. Thinking with ethnography, feminist philosophy, fiction, and film, we will explore whether vulnerability may be taken as a condition to live with rather than one to overcome at any cost.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.639.  Kinship: Old and New.  

We will track the transformations in kinship theory in relation to wider changes in legal theory, biomedicine, and the relation between state and family. In particular, we will ask how the concepts of sovereignty, gift, exchange, human and non-human milieus affect notions of relations.Open to undergraduate anthropology majors with instructors approval..Co-listed with AS.070.426

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.642.  Design Anthropology.  

From casinos to canoes, algorithms to animal traps, our worlds are bursting with intentional objects. The word design has come to evoke the prestige of such objects, and their power to shape our collective habits and sensations. This course explores the anthropology of designed artifacts and their complex social trajectories. Beginning with philosophical investigations into the relationship between materials, form, and craft, we will proceed through ethnographic case studies of design as expert discourse and ordinary practice. Ultimately we will consider the affinities between the ethnography and design as open-ended and not entirely predictable engagements with the world.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.658.  Intimacy and Corruption.  

Course takes problem of corruption as an ethnographic site from which we can explore how concepts of visibility, secrecy, intimacy and transgression inform political life. We will examine how ideas of intimacy and propriety are expressed in public scandals of corruption, as well as the forms of anxiety that surround routine practices of bribery, influence-peddling and enticement.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.659.  Proposal Writing.  

The seminar will offer a forum for students to discuss research projects, prepare grant proposals and think further about issues of ethnographic methodology and writing. Open to Anthropology graduate students only.

Writing Intensive

AS.070.665.  Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic Texts.  

What is the nature of anthropological concepts and what relations do they bear to concepts internal to a society? We invite students to think with key ideas from Hindu and Islamic traditions, asking if anthropological concepts are best seen as abstractions from the particular or as intertwined with ongoing lines of inquiry, say into the nature of the real and continual efforts to test it? Topics in ritual theory, grammar, aesthetics, translation, revelation, luminosity, figuration and the mythological among those to be considered.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.669.  Readings in Science, Technology, and Society.  

In the forty years since laboratories were first treated as ethnographic field sites, the core questions guiding anthropology and science and technology studies (STS) have grown increasingly intertwined. How does knowledge get made, and how does it come to matter? How do the objects of technoscience become embedded in everyday practice and in our senses of self, and how do shared imaginaries influence the kinds of futures technologists strive to produce? This course will explore critical moments in the development of STS through texts that blur the lines between experts and kin in biomedicine, finance, industrial agriculture, drone warfare, transnational surrogacy, and other technoscientific spaces.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.671.  Political Anthropology.  

This course explores anthropological debates regarding politics and the political. Through readings drawn from both recent and "classic" ethnographies of the political, we will trace how anthropologist have engaged issues of hierarchy, differentiation, power, suasion, command, collectivity, and voice in their accounts of social and cultural worlds.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.673.  Readings of Foucault.  

We will do a close reading of selected texts of Foucault to track the concepts of power, subjectivity, government, and care of the self.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.681.  Energopolitics : Cultures of Energy.  

How do different ways of harnessing energy shape life and environment? This course delves into the social, political, even philosophical properties of oil, coal, sunlight sugar, and other sources that fuel human activity. Through these topics, we will consider the cultural meaning of concepts such as charge and expenditure, work and waste.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.682.  Readings in Anthropology.  

This course introduces classical texts from the anthropological archives in relation to contemporary debates in the discipline. In this year’s iteration, our readings and discussion will explore the idea of a public and engaged anthropology.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.685.  About Time.  

This course will explore time from an anthropological perspective.What is time? An object, a dimension, a sensation? Can we “have” time? What is the relation between power and the control of time? Through readings and discussions of classical and current anthropological theories and ethnographies, we will analyze the meaning, experience and textures of time in different cultural settings. Case studies will explore the US, the West and the Global South, with special emphasis on conceptions of the future: expectations, anticipations, preemption, emergence, possibility. We will study imaginations of temporality and futurity in relation to fields such as politics, custom, finance, security, labor, climate change and so on, looking into the role that emotions play in relation to time.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.687.  Romanticism and Anthropology.  

The word "romantic" has long carried negative connotations within anthropology meaning the tendency to idealize, exoticize, or seek out the irrational. Instead, through a focus on the themes of magic, art, myth, nature and creativity, we suggest that romantic philosophy has offered and continues to offer much of interest for contemporary anthropology. Drawing on select readings in philosophy and anthropology, we will explore the suppressed romantic legacy of anthropology. This is an undergraduate and graduate combined course. Recommended Course Background: Undergraduates have to have taken at least one anthropology course (any level) to register. Or else they need the permission of the instructor.

Writing Intensive

AS.070.688.  Senses of State.  

This course examines how anthropologists study the temporal, material and sensory domains through which people make sense of the state as a bureaucratic, governmental and sovereign presence in their lives.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.691.  The Anthropological Tone in Philosophy.  

This course will ask: what constitutes an anthropological tone in philosophy? We will take up classical topics such as rule following, everyday life, skepticism, concept formation, realism, and signification in selected texts of anthropology and philosophy for understanding if these crisscross and overlap.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.693.  Precarity.  

How do we understand and engage precariousness and vulnerability in the contemporary world? This seminar explores the notion of precarity in anthropology and social theory. We will explore this notion genealogically asking such questions as: what are the forms of politics arising in relation to new transformations of labor? What are the regional debates in which the notion of precarity has arisen? We will then explore how anthropology has responded to ongoing destruction of whole forms of life, through war, settler colonialism, displacement, and poverty.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.694.  Region in Anthropology.  

This course, designed for second-year anthropology students, focuses on the idea of region in contemporary anthropology. We will explore what region means now for anthropology, the relationship between geographic and conceptual delineations, and how to frame a problem in regional terms. Working collaboratively in the manner of a workshop, we seek to make drafts of the regional essay for comprehensive exams.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.695.  Householding on a Warming Earth.  

The household appears as commonsensical to us. It is where people, most often those of a family, reside together, sharing its resources, labor and collective fate. However, anthropologists have been arguing against this commonsense since it emerged in the 1950s. Yet the household is back again in climate change policy discussions as being most vulnerable to the problems associated with climate change, such as, temperature extremes, food insecurity, exacerbated disease, enhanced competition and violence. How might anthropological debates and controversies relating to households and householding as an activity within the context of war, famine and migration, provide important insights into today’s urgencies?

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.070.698.  Defining Region.  

This course is open to anthropology graduate students only and is to be run on a workshopmodel. It is to help those students writing their regional essay for the comprehensive exams toacquire expertise in regional debates and literature relevant to their field research. Our understanding of regions is one of cross-cutting concepts and questions rather than geographical framings alone. After identifying a concept or question, each student will create an annotated bibliography, trace the shape of arguments as they emerge within the readings, create an outline and work toward a draft of the final essay.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.801.  Dissertation Research.  
AS.070.802.  Dissertation Research.  
AS.070.866.  Directed Readings and Research.  
AS.070.867.  Directed Reading and Research.  
AS.070.869.  Directed Reading and Research.  
AS.070.870.  Directed Readings and Research.  

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.070.871.  Directed Reading and Research.  
AS.070.872.  Directed Readings and Research.  
AS.070.874.  Directed Readings and Research.  
AS.070.885.  Directed Reading and Research.  
AS.070.886.  Dir Readings & Research.  
AS.070.892.  Directed Readings and Research.