Counseling & Educational Studies 

ED.820.600.  Introduction to Statistics.  3 Credits.  

This course is designed as an introduction to basic descriptive and inferential statistics, with a focus on how they are used in education research. Students will learn to describe variables using graphs and tables, and summarize variable distribution using measures of central tendency and spread. As a basis for inferential statistics, students will explore concepts of basic probability, and apply them to understand probability sampling, sampling distribution, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals. Finally, students will learn to describe the relationship between two variables using correlation and regression.Students will apply this knowledge to a series of problem sets that ask them to think about research problems in education, and conduct their own analysis of an educational or other social science problem in a research paper that asks them to conduct a bivariate analysis and discuss their results.

ED.820.601.  Intermediate Statistics.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces students to multiple regression as a tool for inferential statistics in the social science, with a focus on applications to education research. Students will begin with a review of basic statistical concepts, then move on the basics of linear regression including model assumptions, estimation, and statistical inference. Emphasis will be placed on interpreting coefficients, assessing model fit, and critiquing empirical studies. We will review methods for specific types of data in the linear model, including categorical variables, interactions, data transformations and limited dependent variables. Finally, students will consider the limitations of regression and diagnostics for challenges including missing data and outliers.This course is designed for students who have had at least a one-semester introduction to statistics. Students should have existing knowledge of probability theory, properties of distribution and random sampling, and basic statistical tests.

ED.820.602.  Introduction to Education Policy.  3 Credits.  

Introduction to Education Policy is an intensive hybrid course in the first summer, which will be delivered partially in-person in Washington, DC, and partially online. Through the preparatory readings, an online pre-test, and a five full-day study and learning experience, students will grapple with the current challenges that apply to different levels of education policy and their relevance to the structure, content, and funding of education in the United States. The readings, assignments, and seminars with senior policy experts will introduce students to the central dilemmas and debates in education policy. Students will leave the course with a strong foundation from which to engage, in much greater depth, with course material throughout the degree.

ED.820.603.  Federal Education Policy.  3 Credits.  

This course will explore the federal government’s role in K-12 education policy. While the course will address the historic roots of the federal government’s role, it will focus largely on the federal government’s rapidly evolving policy role in education over the past two decades. During this period, on global measures of education, U.S. performance has stagnated while other countries’ results trend up, and educational achievement gaps continue to reflect a system that is riddled with inequity. Technology is playing a greater role in students’ learning out of school – and indeed in all facets of Americans’ personal and professional lives – but educators are struggling to use technology effectively in schools. Teachers unions are engaged in existential identity crises, while over one million new teachers will enter the profession in the coming decade. And the hyper-partisan conflicts that we see across the country come home to roost in the context of education policy as fights over which level of government is in charge of what. In this course, students will explore many of these issues, including: the historic roots of the federal role in education within the context of the Civil Rights movement; the structure of the U.S. educational system; school accountability and the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)’s evolution over time; academic standards and assessments; school turnaround and choice; and educator effectiveness and teacher policy.

ED.820.604.  Diversity.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces students to the ways in which diverse student bodies are constructed, educated, and multiply challenged in K-12 American education. Students will analyze research on, and craft responses to, the following issues: the social construction of race; racial achievement gaps; the impact of socioeconomics upon educational performance; the ways in which students of diverse religions and sexual orientations, and who are differently-abled, experience the classroom; and the challenges to creating high-quality culturally relevant educational experiences.

ED.820.605.  International Education Policy.  3 Credits.  

K-12 education outcomes in the United States are often contrasted with those of other countries, especially nations now showing stronger results than America on international assessments such as TIMSS (Third International Math and Science Study) and PISA (Program for International Student Assessment). But what, exactly, are the top-performing countries doing differently from the United States? How do they structure K-12 education, and how do they manage accountability for excellence? Students will research these questions from several vantage points. They will review synoptic treatments that span multiple countries, and do a “deep dive” on one country’s reforms and evaluate the impact of the different ways in which countries abroad structure their public education systems. Finally, students will assess the strengths and weaknesses of applying international models to their own national or state contexts.

ED.820.606.  State and Local Education Policy.  3 Credits.  

Since the creation of public schools, education in the US has predominantly been a state and local prerogative. Through this course, students will acquire an empirically-grounded and theoretically-informed understanding of state and local education policy and politics, investigating how various actors, institutions, interests, and issue contexts influence the development, implementation, and outcomes of education policies within and across states and school districts. Through engagement with primary data, documents, and in-depth case studies of different jurisdictions and policy issues, students will develop an appreciation of the complexity of state and local education governance, the opportunities this system presents for educational innovation and diversity, the challenges of reforming education through policy, and the role of research in shaping policy. The course will also introduce students to the concept of intergovernmental relations and the implications of this dynamic for education policymaking and outcomes. Ultimately, the course will push students to engage in thoughtful discussions about the contours, purpose, promise, and limitations of state and local education policy.

ED.820.607.  Understanding Education Research.  3 Credits.  

One of the most familiar refrains in education policy is: “research shows….” But what exactly does this mean? This course will help students better understand education research, with a focus on methodology and its application in education research. For each method studied, students will learn the structure and requirements of the method, common challenges faced by researchers employing the method, and conclusions that can be drawn from the method. Once students understand the method from a theoretical standpoint, this knowledge will be applied by reading and discussing a peer-reviewed journal article that employs the method to answer a question in the field of education. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the methodologies and articles by leading an online discussion of one article; writing a summary of each methodology/article read; participating in online discussions; and writing a summative research proposal.

ED.820.608.  Education Finance.  3 Credits.  

This course will give students a strong understanding of the history of education finance, how and from what sources public education is financed in the United States, various finance reforms, and the impact of finance structures on student outcomes and other educational policies. Specifically, the course will layout the tri-part structure of funding between federal, state, and local governments, the revenue sources available to each, and policy tensions created between the three levels of government. The course will cover specific federal funding elements such as the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Title I, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). On a state level, the course will provide an understanding of the constitutional requirement that each state has to finance public education and the various ways states elect to do this. The course will use case studies from states that have unique funding structures, such as Indiana which abolished local funding of public education. Next, the course will offer an analysis of various finance reforms focusing on court ordered reforms as a result of state finance litigation as well as more recent funding interventions such as education savings accounts and tax credits along with the debates surrounding these issues. Throughout the course, students will wrestle with ideas over what it means to have equitable, sufficient, and adequate education funding and how education finance affects student outcomes.

ED.820.609.  Outside the Schoolhouse.  3 Credits.  

It is often said that the greatest impact on student learning comes from outside the school, via family background and the educational opportunities associated with income and education levels. Students will be introduced to the macro-data that is used to test these claims. They will review evidence on family structure and its intersection with race and economics, behavior that can challenge economic determinism, and initiatives such as Say Yes and Thread that are intended to support students to achieve outsized success. How successful are these programs – and where they are successful, and are they scalable? The course will also review the research on “community schools” and “wrap-around services” – two related approaches to giving less privileged students some of the supports that are automatic for those of greater means.

ED.820.610.  Capstone Course.  3 Credits.  

The capstone course will offer students real-world work scenarios in which they will apply knowledge and skills gained during the program. Students will choose from a list of topics provided by the supporting organizations of the program – from the public and non-profit sector. They will research the topic, and then create three items: a policy brief, an Op. Ed., and a blog entry on their findings. Their work will be read by the most appropriate program partner, as well as being read and graded by the course instructor. The strongest of the policy briefs will be published by the Institute for Education Policy.

ED.820.611.  Experiential Learning.  3 Credits.  

This course is an elective that may be taken by candidates who have not yet worked in an organization that influences, responds to, studies, or implements education policy. Based on initial market analysis, IEP anticipates that the majority of our applicants will come to us with some in-field experience. This may come from legislative or Congressional offices, state education agencies and district offices, mayoral offices, education research centers, or public policy think tanks. To candidates who are undertaking the program for the purpose of gaining skills that enable a transition into this field for the first time, we will offer a field placement designed to support a sustained, on-the-ground experience with education policy.The field placement will be designed in collaboration with the candidate, to reflect his or her professional goals and geographic environment, and the needs of the hosting institution. Candidates must have received, prior to the start of Spring semester, written program approval of their proposed placement, mentor, projects, and deliverables. Mentors will receive a stipend for their role. Candidates’ work will be supervised by the mentor and evaluated by IEP faculty.

ED.840.600.  Instructional STEM Leadership and Professional Development in the Elementary School.  3 Credits.  

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of theoretical perspectives and research influencing STEM instructional leadership in elementary schools. Students will consider curriculum development, supervision and evaluation of teaching, assessment of student learning, and the design and implementation of school improvement programs. Strategies for developing a constructive, collaborative approach to supporting STEM teachers to improve student learning outcomes will be emphasized.

ED.840.601.  Mathematical Foundations in the Pre-K-6 Classroom.  3 Credits.  

The goal of this course is to support Pre-K-6 content knowledge for teaching related to the following topics: patterns; number and operation; measurement and data. Connections of these topics to an integrated approach to curriculum and instruction will be emphasized.

ED.840.650.  Physical Science in an Integrated Pre-K-6 Classroom.  3 Credits.  

The goal of this course is to provide Pre-K-6 teachers a rich understanding of foundational physical science concepts and their applications in an integrated science, technology, engineering, and mathematical world. Topics will include; structure, properties, and interactions of matter; physical and chemical properties of materials; mechanicsforce, and motion; gravity, energy transformation, energy sources, electricity, magnetism, light, sound, and wave interactions. Problem-based inquires will be organized to engage the participants in planning investigations, gathering and analyzing data, offering plausible explanations, and developing a deeper knowledge base in the physical sciences. The engineering design process will be integrated throughout the course.

ED.840.651.  Earth and Space Science in an Integrated Pre-K-6 Classroom.  3 Credits.  

The goal of this course is to provide Pre-K-6 teachers a rich understanding of Earth and space science content and pedagogy. Topics will include: chemical and physical interactions of the environment, Earth, and the universe; weathering and erosion; processes and events causing changes in Earth's surface; Earth history; plate tectonics; and astronomy. Problem-based inquiries will be organized to engage participants in planning investigations; gathering and analyzing data; offering plausible explanations, and developing a deeper knowledge base of Earth and space science. The engineering design process will be integrated throughout the course.

ED.840.652.  Life Science in an Integrated Pre-K-6 Classroom.  3 Credits.  

The goal of this course is to provide Pre-K-6 teachers a rich understanding of life science content and pedagogy. Topics will include: living organisms and their interactions, diversity of life, genetics, evolution, flow of matter and energy, and ecology. The applications and impact of technology on human life will be an important feature of the course. Problem-based inquiries will be organized to engage the participants in planning investigations, gathering and analyzing data, offering plausible explanations, and developing a deeper knowledge base of life science. The engineering design process will be integrated throughout the course.

ED.840.670.  Advanced Methods in the Elementary STEM Classroom.  3 Credits.  

This course will engage students in technology-enhanced, problem-based, and student-centered instructional strategies. Participants will learn to create an integrated, inclusive, and equitable STEM approach to support Pre-K-6 student learning and positive affect toward STEM. The course will include skills essential to the STEM learning environment.

ED.840.671.  Algebraic and Geometric Thinking in the Pre-K-6 Classroom.  3 Credits.  

This course will model the process standards of problem-solving, reasoning and proof, representations, connections and communication within the context of algebraic and geometric thinking (NCTM, 2000).

ED.840.672.  Advanced Topics in the Pre-K-6 Mathematics Classroom.  3 Credits.  

The purpose of this course is to develop teachers' content knowledge for teaching (knowledge of mathematics content, pedagogy, and student learning) in the context of advanced mathematics. This course builds on the previous courses: Mathematical Foundations in the Pre-K-6 Classroom and Algebraic and Geometric Thinking in the Pre-K-6 Classroom.

ED.840.673.  Practicum in STEM and Mathematical Instructional Leadership.  3 Credits.  

Candidates participate in a supervised practicum experience in an educational setting under the direction of the faculty where they demonstrate the application of knowledge, dispositions, competencies, skills and solutions to day-to-day activities performed by Mathematical and or STEM Instructional Leaders. Experiences are reflective of real and simulated field-based activities in a variety of educational settings. Candidates must complete a final practicum reflection paper, as well as a comprehensive portfolio that includes artifacts that are illustrative of their best work from the program.

ED.851.630.  School, Family, and Community Collaboration for School Improvement I.  3 Credits.  

Participants examine the theory, research, and best practices on school, family, and community partnerships. Individuals explore different types of partnerships, challenges to developing school-based partnership programs, and the components of effective partnership programs that enhance student performance and success. Participants design an action plan for partnerships to address school improvement goals.

ED.851.631.  School, Family, and Community Collaboration for School Improvement II.  3 Credits.  

Building on the knowledge and skills developed in 851.630 (School, Family, and Community Collaboration for School Improvement I), students continue to explore research-based theories and best practices in school, family, and community collaboration. The emphasis of this second course in the sequence is on students revising, implementing, and evaluating a key activity in the action plan for partnerships developed in 851.630.

Prerequisite(s): ED.851.630

ED.851.633.  Introduction to the Independent School.  3 Credits.  

This course will focus on the unique quality of the independent school. A specific focus will remain on the relationship between the parent and the teacher, reworking curriculum to fit the diverse needs of the student, understanding the importance of pedagogy and history in the independent school, and fostering a love of learning in each child.

ED.851.634.  Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in Independent School Settings.  3 Credits.  

Students consider the philosophical, historical, and psychological foundations for lower and upper school curriculum and explore the linkages between assessment-based curriculum and instructional strategies. After examining the scope and sequence of the lower and upper school curricula, students evaluate options presented in various school reform plans that pertain to independent schools and contemporary research findings on effective schools and effective instruction.

ED.851.635.  Educating the Whole Child: Teaching to the Developmental Needs of the Child.  3 Credits.  

This course will provide students with a whole picture of the child they will be, or are, teaching. In-depth examination will be on the cognitive, physical, and emotional development of a child from age 4 through 18 years.

ED.855.500.  Language Acquisition in TEFL.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on the language acquisition process when learning English as a foreign language, including research on current theories of language learning, using translanguaging as a pedagogical tool, incorporating multilingual learning strategies, and creating linguistically and culturally responsive programs. Students will review the foundational components of English language learning and the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of those who demonstrate intercultural communicative competency.

ED.855.501.  Language and Culture in TEFL.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on the development of intercultural knowledge, awareness, skills, and the impact of culture on language learning and communication. Students will take a critical, sociocultural, and functional view of the role for understanding culture when teaching English as a foreign language or as a lingua franca. Students will investigate the cultural, social, and historical underpinnings of communication across cultures.

ED.855.510.  Building Productive Learning Relationships for TEFL.  1 Credit.  

This course provides an opportunity for individuals to develop competency in teaching English as a foreign language. Students engage in a series of interactive online modules to learn and apply research-based instructional practices designed to provide processes that 1) build a trusting and inclusive partnership, group, or community that maximizes engagement, learning, and achievement and 2) emphasize how to create a motivating and safe environment to learn and communicate with each other using both their heritage language and English. These practical practices are tailored specifically to motivate learners with different heritage languages to actively speak, understand, and communicate in English.

ED.855.530.  Foundational Concepts of STEM.  3 Credits.  

This course will build upon student understanding of the science of learning related to the integration of STEM disciplines. In the present course, students will be challenged to apply the understanding of integration by deepening their understanding of STEM instructional strategies. Students will examine STEM instructional programs and their opportunities for supporting learning through an opportunity to learn perspective. That is, students will be able to articulate how they would create STEM instructional units and programs with the focus on both the affordances and barriers to developing STEM curriculum. Students will enact this learning by developing technology-enhanced, problem-based, and student-centered instructional programs. Participants will learn to create an integrated, inclusive, and equitable STEM approach to support student learning and positive affect toward STEM.

ED.855.540.  Integration of STEM Content through the Science of Learning.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine STEM integration from a science of learning perspectives at the theoretical, empirical, and applied level. Students will explore the ways in which STEM integration supports memory, conceptual understanding, active learning, metacognition, conceptual understanding, and transfer of knowledge from multidisciplinary perspectives on learning. Specifically, the course examines the process and environments in which STEM integration can promote learning.

ED.855.550.  Leading STEM Instructional Programs & Professional Development.  3 Credits.  

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of theoretical perspectives and empirical research pertaining to leadership and effective professional development. Students will critically examine models of professional development, coaching, supervision, and evaluation of STEM instruction. Students will explore data-driven design to integrate STEM content areas and explore school improvement programs. Strategies for developing a constructive, collaborative approach to supporting STEM teachers to improve student learning outcomes will be emphasized.

ED.855.600.  Extended Learning I.  

Students will participate in a variety of informal educational experiences, from guest lectures and one-on-one mentor conversations, to exploring how the use of museums, cultural institutions, and other real-world scenarios can be leveraged to promote learning. Students will both learn from these experiences as well as gain exemplars to implement in their own educational systems.

ED.855.601.  Extended Learning II.  

Students will participate in a variety of informal educational experiences, from guest lectures and one-on-one mentor conversations, to exploring how the use of museums, cultural institutions, and other real-world scenarios can be leveraged to promote learning. Students will both learn from these experiences as well as gain exemplars to implement in their own educational systems.

ED.855.603.  The Early Childhood Learner.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on the growth and development of the young child, including current theory and practice in child development and neuroscience. Early childhood educators will analyze the diversity of learner characteristics in young children, including growth and development in the cognitive, physical, and social-emotional domains.

ED.855.608.  Comparative High Quality Practices in Early Education.  3 Credits.  

This course presents research-based content on high quality, developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood education. Early childhood educators will incorporate tenets of learning theory into proposed lesson planning that reflects developmentally appropriate and inclusive practices for young children. Early childhood educators will demonstrate strategies for professional development and coaching of peers and families in developmentally appropriate practices.

ED.855.609.  Introduction to Entrepreneurship in Education.  3 Credits.  

This course provides students with the foundational skills necessary to think and behave entrepreneurially within educational systems and organizations in order to solve intractable problems. Students will formulate an understanding of themselves as entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs, evaluate entrepreneurial opportunities around them, and develop a method for solving a problem relevant to them. Further, students will learn the role of capital and socially conscious capitalism in creating sustainable ventures.

ED.855.610.  Seminar in Teacher Leadership.  2 - 3 Credits.  

Students in the final year present and evaluate their projects and plans for implementing change in their work environments. In addition, participants examine selected topics and current issues in educational leadership.

ED.855.614.  Planning a New Venture in Education.  3 Credits.  

This course provides students with a survey of the skills necessary to plan a new venture in education, either within an organization or a brand-new enterprise. Topics taught in this course include Human Resources, Sales and Marketing, Finance and Budgeting, and Leadership.

ED.855.617.  Launching a New Venture in Education.  3 Credits.  

This course provides students with a survey of the skills necessary to launch and operate a venture in education, either within an organization or an independent enterprise. Topics taught in this course include Human Resources, Sales and Marketing, Securing Funding and Capital, and Strategic Growth and Transition.

ED.855.618.  The Sustainable Venture.  3 Credits.  

This course provides students with the tools and resources necessary for ensuring long-term success and impact for an educational venture. The course will review how to build stability with strategic partnerships. Further, it will teach students how educational ventures weather leadership transitions and changing sociopolitical landscapes. Additionally, the course will cover the importance of social capitalism in education and a venture’s contribution to social justice to ensure long-term sustainability.

ED.855.619.  Global Leadership.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the nature of leadership in the current global society. Students will analyze the behaviors, practices, characteristics and qualities of effective global leaders across a variety of sectors. Students will understand global competence and learn how to become a globally competent leader.

ED.855.630.  Authentic Assessment and Measuring Child Outcomes and School Readiness.  3 Credits.  

This course presents foundational concepts of authentic assessment in early childhood, including the types and purposes of assessments for young children and accompanying requisite skills in their administration. Early childhood educators will learn interpretation of assessment data and apply assessment data results to program planning in the implementation of early childhood programs.

ED.860.501.  Crisis Intervention and Assessment.  1 Credit.  

This course provides an overview of the various crises that may trigger trauma; theories and models of intervention; assessment techniques in crisis situations, and the issue of client resistance is also examined from a cognitive-behavioral point of view.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.507

ED.860.639.  Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.  3 Credits.  

Cognitive behavior therapy is one of the most popular contemporary models across the helping professions because it allows clients to evaluate and alter maladaptive thought patterns that may have an adverse impact on behavior. This course explores foundations of cognitive behavior therapy to include theoretical underpinnings, methods/models, applications, and research findings around efficacy for use with various adult populations. Cross-cultural issues and ethical practices are also examined, and the course reviews models and methods for child and adolescent populations.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.502 AND ED.863.501 AND ED.861.605 AND ED.861.507 AND ED.863.607 AND ED.861.609 AND ED.863.709

ED.860.822.  Entrepreneurship in Mental Health: Introduction to Building a Private Practice.  3 Credits.  

Students investigate principles related to business foundation, principles, legal and ethical implications, and the development of private practice. The course will explore legal, ethical, and practical ways to start a private practice while ensuring that students have a comprehensive expectation and exposure to current practice sites. Students will examine methods to combine the counseling profession, with clients, while establishing and leading a business.

ED.861.502.  Counseling Theory and Practice.  3 Credits.  

(Lab course) This course provides an overview of the major theories of counseling and therapy, such as cognitive, behavioral, existential, Gestalt, and Adlerian. Students explore integrative approaches, as well as multicultural and feminist perspectives. Participants focus on a wide range of specific techniques and practices that are associated with each theory and how they are applied in various situations. <P><I>Notes: </I>Students are required to attend the two-day laboratory sessions. Laboratory courses and internship classes involve an exploration of personal factors as they contribute to counseling skills and techniques.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.605

ED.861.503.  Group Counseling and Group Experience.  3 Credits.  

(Lab course) Students investigate practical and theoretical concepts of group dynamics and group counseling to acquire skills in facilitating various kinds of group interaction. Students explore interpersonal dynamics, personal communication styles, fundamental group counseling strategies, and group facilitation through class and laboratory experiences. <P><I>Notes: </I>Students are required to attend the two-day laboratory sessions. Laboratory courses and internship classes involve an exploration of personal factors as they contribute to counseling skills and techniques.

Prerequisite(s): ( ED.861.614 OR ED.861.605) AND ED.861.502 AND ED.861.507 AND ED.863.501 AND ED.863.607 AND ED.861.609 AND ED.863.709 AND ED.863.795

ED.861.507.  Counseling Techniques.  3 Credits.  

(Lab course) This course provides an overview of the history and philosophy of professional counseling, with special attention to the roles, functions, and limitations of school, community, and organizational counselors. Included is an understanding of the essentials of basic counseling skills; attending, listening, and interviewing stages of clinical treatment; and client/counselor relationships. Students learn about professional counseling organizations, professional credentialing, and standards and ethics in counseling and related human services. The course emphasizes self-growth, awareness, and observational skills as related to becoming a facilitator of individual, group, family, and systems change.

ED.861.511.  Career/Life Development and Planning.  3 Credits.  

Participants review major theories of career development and decision making, occupational sociology, and vocational psychology. The course places career counseling concepts in a life-span perspective and reviews career development materials and cross-cultural strategies. <P><I>Notes: </I>Tuition includes materials fee.

Prerequisite(s): (ED.861.614 OR ED.863.501) AND ED.861.605 AND ED.861.502 AND ED.861.507 AND ED.863.607

ED.861.513.  Integrating Alternative Approaches to Mental Wellness.  3 Credits.  

The course seeks to include culturally diverse counseling practices such as mindfulness, yoga meditation, and expressive arts combining them with conventional psychotherapies such as Adlerian, existential, Gestalt, behavioral and cognitive behavioral therapies. It builds on the foundation established in ED.861.502 Counseling Theory and Practice wherein students introspect, analyze and synthesize essential concepts from various psychotherapeutic theories aiming to develop a personalized integrative theory. The emphasis is on a therapist’s creation of a repertoire of counseling techniques and interventions, drawn from multiple theories and most importantly from the client’s own life practices. Students learn to integrate key concepts from theories such as cognitive, behavioral, existential, Adlerian and Gestalt while concurrently resourcing alternative therapeutic modalities of expressive arts, mindfulness, movement, music, and yoga meditation. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of a therapist’s regard for client’s competence in overcoming challenges to facilitate relief from emotional distress, reprieve from behavioral dysfunction and restructuring of maladaptive cognitive schema. (3 credits)

ED.861.605.  Human Development and Counseling.  3 Credits.  

This course reviews significant findings regarding current theory and practice in human growth and development along the life span through a biopsychosocial lens. Learners gain insights into aspects of human development that impact behavior in a variety of realms to include biological, cognitive, socio-emotional, and dispositional influences. Course outcomes focus on theoretical understanding and application of research findings to normal functioning as well as case conceptualization and counseling interventions within school and clinical mental health counseling populations.

ED.861.609.  Diagnosis in Counseling.  3 Credits.  

Students study the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM V) to learn to assess, diagnose, and treat psychopathology based on current DSM criteria. Theories related to the etiology of major categories of mental disorder such as anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and personality disorders are examined. Students gain an understanding of the impact of abnormal behavior on individuals, families, and society. Instructors provide a developmental framework for understanding diagnosis from multicultural, feminist, and systems perspectives. <P><I>Notes: </I> Must be taken before ED.863.809 or ED.863.870.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.507 AND ED.861.502 AND ED.861.605 AND ED.863.501

ED.861.612.  Appraisal and Testing for Counselors.  3 Credits.  

Students explore individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation through the use of standardized test instruments and rating scales. Emphasis is given to principles of test construction, reliability and validity, psychometric properties, and strategies for the selection, administration and interpretation of behavioral, psychological, and educational tests. Implications of age, gender, ethnicity, culture, heritage, language, disability, and professional/ethical issues are examined. <P><I>Notes: </I> Tuition includes materials fee.

ED.861.614.  The Foundations of School Counseling.  3 Credits.  

This course is a survey of the knowledge base and practices in contemporary school counseling. It will emphasize the educational, historical, sociological, economic, philosophical, and psychological dynamics of the professional school counselor’s role. Students integrate knowledge and learn skills to examine data driven comprehensive school counseling programs that enhance academic, career, and personal/social development for all students.

ED.861.713.  Advanced Treatment Approaches.  3 Credits.  

This course explores a wide range of effective techniques and strategies in counseling and therapy, in the context of successfully treating various mental and emotional disorders. Approaches and procedures from such diverse models as psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, experiential, and systemic are explored, along with theories of change and research findings on effective counseling and therapy.

ED.863.501.  Introduction to Clinical Mental Health Counseling.  3 Credits.  

This course provides an overview of the role and scope of the clinical mental health counseling profession. Students address a number of topics including the historical, theoretical, philosophical, and empirical foundations of clinical mental health counseling. The course addresses role functions and employment settings of mental health counselors; program development, emergency management, prevention, intervention, consultation, assessment approaches, and education; and the contextual dimensions of diverse clients seeking mental health counseling services.This course is a requirement of our accrediting body, the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). This is a foundational course that prepares students to work in a broad range of mental health counseling programs by acquainting them with the foundations of clinical mental health counseling.

ED.863.524.  Individual and Group Dynamics: Behavior in Context.  3 Credits.  

Individual and group dynamics are at the core of adaptive or maladaptive human behavior. A solid grounding in basic empirically-derived principles of motivation aids counselors in better formulating and presenting problems and in conceptualizing appropriate interventions. Foundations for this course are derived from classic theories and research findings in personality psychology, social psychology, cross-cultural psychology, and neuroscience. Students explore the influence of the person, the situation, and cultural diversity as forces in shaping behavioral tendencies. A unifying theme within the course is the influence of resilience as a dispositional perspective for both the client and the helping professional.

ED.863.571.  Counseling Adolescents.  3 Credits.  

This course provides an overview of the various aspects of adolescent counseling, ranging from adolescent depression, suicide, crisis, drug and alcohol abuse, peer pressure, self-esteem issues, culture, family issues, and developmental themes. Part of the course is dedicated to examining current research on adolescents. The emphasis of the course is on clinical training in group, family, and individual contexts. Relevant ethical and legal issues are addressed. <P><I>Notes: </I> This course must be taken prior to ED.863.820. Master’s students must have completed a minimum of 15 credits before registering for this course.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.502[C] OR ED.861.503[C] OR ED.861.507[C] OR ED.861.609[C]

ED.863.603.  Couple and Family Therapy.  3 Credits.  

(Lab Course) Students study the theory and practice of family therapy with an emphasis on models of family development and major approaches to intervention with families. Systemic models of family intervention are emphasized, as well as the study of other historically important and contemporary approaches to family therapy. The course blends didactic and experiential learning. <P><I>Notes: </I> Students are required to attend the two-day laboratory sessions. Laboratory courses and internship classes involve an exploration of personal factors as they contribute to counseling skills and techniques. Master’s students must have completed a minimum of 15 credits before registering for this course .

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.605 AND ED.861.502 AND ED.861.507 AND ED.863.501 AND ED.863.607 AND ED.861.609 AND ED.863.709

ED.863.607.  Diversity and Social Justice in Counseling.  3 Credits.  

Participants explore aspects of counseling clients from diverse ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Through didactic and experiential learning techniques, students consider counseling strategies for enhancing cross-cultural interventions. (3 credits)

ED.863.626.  Behavioral Medicine and Health Psychology Applications in Clinical Mental Health Counseling.  3 Credits.  

This course provides a broad introduction to the field of behavioral medicine as part of the field of health psychology. Through a culturally-sensitive biopsychosocial lens, students examine theory and research as it applies to behavioral and emotional factors that impact the delivery of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention efforts as part of a multidisciplinary team within medical settings. The content will explore applications of behavioral medicine and health psychology principles to a variety of health care conditions as they occur across the developmental continuum, preparing the clinical mental health counselor for a variety of roles in health care systems.

ED.863.630.  Addictions Counseling I: Theory and Approaches.  3 Credits.  

Students explore the fundamental principles of addictions counseling from a wide range of perspectives. These include the psychopharmacological aspects of alcohol and abusable drugs, along with theories and assessments of addictive disorders. Many treatment models are considered and examined in the context of individual, group, and family therapy perspectives. The course also addresses the research literature on codependence, COA's, AA and other 12-step programs, dual diagnosis, relapse, prevention, and multicultural and gender issues. (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.605 AND ED.861.502 AND ED.861.507 AND ED.863.501 AND ED.863.607 AND ED.863.709 AND ED.861.609

ED.863.674.  Meditation and Mindfulness.  3 Credits.  

This course explores various methods of meditation from a counseling perspective to experientially understand multicultural practices that offer relief from emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression. Emphasis is placed on neuroscientific validation of meditation as a process to cultivate mindfulness and healing presence in a counseling setting. Students research natural outcomes such as concentration, awareness and insight both into self and with client. Eastern world concepts of ego, mind, body, mental health, psychopathology, suffering, compassion, and liberation are also addressed. A portion of class will be devoted to the actual practice and application of techniques from reading assignments.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.502

ED.863.681.  Research and Evaluation for Counselors.  3 Credits.  

Participants learn the basic concepts for understanding and conducting research and program evaluation related to the counseling and human services fields. Students study experimental and quasi-experimental designs, examine quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and learn basic statistical procedures for data analysis.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.605 AND ED.861.502 AND ED.861.507 AND ED.863.501 AND ED.863.607 AND ED.861.609 AND ED.863.709

ED.863.709.  Psychopathology.  3 Credits.  

This course provides a broad overview of the field of psychopathology using lifespan development and biopsychosocial models to understand the etiology, psychological dynamics, trajectory, and symptomatology of disordered behavior. Students examine theoretical, clinical, legal, ethical, multicultural, and empirical perspectives as they influence case conceptualization, diagnosis, and treatment formulations within a social justice framework.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.502 AND ED.861.507 AND ED.861.605 AND ED.863.501 AND ED.861.609

ED.863.718.  Counseling Military Families.  3 Credits.  

Students explore aspects and issues affecting military families. Students consider the military as a unique culture within American society; the cultural context of the transmission of values, beliefs, and customs; and the needs of children and spouses of those serving in the military. Considerable time will be spent exploring counseling for issues of PTSD, substance abuse, isolation, frequent relocations, deployment, reintegration into family life, anticipatory loss and grief, anxiety, uncertainty, the effects of war, managing stress and anger, staying healthy, improving sleep and building resiliency. (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.503[C] AND ED.861.507[C] AND ED.861.609[C] AND ED.861.502[C]

ED.863.736.  School Counseling Leadership and Consultation.  3 Credits.  

This course is designed to prepare students to lead programs and employ consultation strategies in the development and implementation of data driven school counseling programs. Students will learn leadership and school-based consultation principles, theories, skills, and models necessary to enhance the learning environment. Emphasis is placed on the role of the school counselor as a systemic change agent. Ultimately, the course will assist future school counselor leaders build effective stakeholder consultation teams that promote equitable services for all K-12 students.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.614[C];ED.863.808[C]

ED.863.795.  Ethical and Legal Issues of Mental Health Counseling.  3 Credits.  

Participants explore professional issues in counseling, with specific regard to ethics and laws that pertain to the profession, such as ethical codes, responsibility, competence, public statements, confidentiality, reporting abuse, and dual relationships. Professional issues in the context of community mental health are also covered in terms of historical, societal, and philosophical aspects, as well as licensing, roles, policies, legislation, reimbursement, and the professional identify of community counselors. Racial and ethnic issues, as well as gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and mental status in community counseling settings are also addressed. (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.605 AND ED.861.502 AND ED.861.507 AND ED.863.501

ED.863.808.  Practicum in School Counseling.  3 Credits.  

This supervised practicum experience is offered in two modalities. The first modality is an experiential course including seminar discussions, review of major theories of counseling with an emphasis on the integration of theory and practice, interview analysis, video and/or audiotape observations, and supervised exercises. Emphasis here is given to the development of foundational counseling skills (i.e. trust building, collaborative goal development, interpretation, summarization, paraphrasing, case conceptualization). The second modality is a practicum course involving 100 hours of individual counseling and group counseling, as well as supervisory experience in a school setting or clinical setting where children and/or adolescents are served. Supervision of this experience will be provided by the on-site supervisor and a school counseling program faculty member. Emphasis here is given to the development of cultural competence, social/emotional issues of children and adolescents (e.g., depression, bullying) and school-related issues (e.g., crisis management). The course is taken near the end of a student's program of study just prior to the internship.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.605 AND ED.861.502 AND ED.861.507 AND ED.861.614 AND ED.861.609 AND ED.863.795 AND ED.861.503

ED.863.820.  Internship in School Counseling.  3 Credits.  

This supervised internship is the first semester of a two-semester supervised internship in school counseling. The course includes both class instruction and a 300-hour internship.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.503 AND ED.861.609 AND ED.861.612 AND (ED.861.614 AND AND ED.863.809 OR ED.863.808) AND ED.863.681

ED.863.828.  Internship in School Counseling II.  3 Credits.  

This supervised internship is the second semester of a two-semester supervised internship in school counseling. The course includes both class instruction and a 300 hour internship

ED.863.830.  Graduate Project in Counseling.  3 Credits.  

Students of demonstrated ability with a special interest in counseling study under the personal direction of a faculty member in the School of Education. Students must meet with their faculty adviser and prepare an outline of the proposed project prior to registration. (1- 6 credits)

ED.863.870.  Practicum in Clinical Mental Health Counseling.  3 Credits.  

This supervised practicum experience is offered in two modalities. The first modality is an experiential course including seminar discussions, review of major theories of counseling with an emphasis on the integration of theory and practice, interview analysis, video and/or audiotape observations, and supervised exercises. Emphasis here is given to the development of foundational counseling skills (i.e. trust building, collaborative goal development, interpretation, summarization, paraphrasing, case conceptualization). The second modality is a practicum course involving practical training at a community-based agency or institution. Training focuses on integrating counseling theories in social context with individual counseling practice. Emphasis here is given to the development of cultural competence in joining, trust building, developing clinical hypotheses and interventions, and collaborating with clients in the development of goals, relevant legal and ethical issues. The course includes both didactic and experiential learning and is taken near the end of a student's program of study just prior to the internship.

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.605 AND ED.861.502 AND ED.861.507 AND ED.863.501 AND ED.861.609 AND ED.863.709 AND ED.863.795 AND ED.861.503;ED.861.503

ED.863.875.  Internship in Clinical Mental Health Counseling I.  3 - 6 Credits.  

This supervised internship is the first semester of a two-semester supervised internship in clinical mental health counseling. The course includes both class instruction and either a 300 or 500-hour internship.

ED.863.876.  Internship in Clinical Mental Health Counseling II.  3 - 6 Credits.  

This supervised internship is the second semester of a two-semester supervised internship in clinical mental health counseling. The course includes both class instruction and either a 300 or 500-hour internship.

Prerequisite(s): ED.863.875

ED.880.603.  Educating the Whole Child: Teaching to the Developmental Needs of the Urban Child.  3 Credits.  

This course will focus participants’ learning on child and adolescent development consistent with developmental pathways: cognitive, linguistic, emotional, social, and physical. Topics include the needs of urban school children relative to health care, nutrition, differentiation, inclusion, special education, gifted education, arts education, higher order thinking and creative problem-solving.

ED.880.611.  The Social Context of Urban Education.  3 Credits.  

The course examines the role played by culture, race, language, and class in creating the conditions that lead to structured inequality of educational outcomes in urban areas. Through a diverse set of readings, students will consider questions such as: What is the role of a state-sponsored, public education in a multicultural democracy? Should all students receive the same education, both in terms of curriculum and pedagogy? Why might some students resist efforts to educate them? Does education reproduce social divisions or provide a way for the most talented to rise in society? Through an exploration of these and related questions, the class addresses the relationship between the concepts of race, language and culture; the controversy over efforts to take language into account in the teaching of some students; “multicultural” approaches to education; pedagogical interventions meant to (a) reach “culturally diverse” learners, and (b) create culturally diverse learners; and the role of education in a pluralistic, democratic society.

ED.880.613.  Teaching, Learning and Leadership for Successful Urban Schools.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine the principles, policies, and practices of leadership and instruction that promote effective schools. Students will be exposed to the Effective Schools Correlates, the principles of the Coalition of Essential Schools and numerous efforts on the local and state and federal level designed to improve the quality of education, particularly as those practices and policies affect urban student achievement. Students will weigh the traditional patterns of teaching, learning, and governance with current federal, state, and local standards and new evidence-based, collaborative practices. Emphasis will be placed on examining models and methodologies currently in use in Baltimore City Public Schools and other local metropolitan areas. Students will use this research and knowledge as a basis for selecting effective methods that could be adapted to their particular setting.

ED.880.617.  Urban School Reform.  3 Credits.  

This course examines systemic school reform movements in the urban school context. School reform occurs at many different levels, from the classroom level with individual teachers, to the national level with federal mandates. We will explore reform at different levels and analyze the theory, policies, practices, and controversies of various mechanisms of reform, including the K-8 movement, small high schools, school choice (charters and vouchers), mayoral control, merit-pay, and alternative routes to teaching. Participants will synthesize information about school reform in urban schools and systems and will reflect on their role in this process. Final evaluation of reform strategies will be grounded in the effect these reforms are having on improving learning for all students in urban schools.

ED.880.623.  Instructional Design for Online Learning.  3 Credits.  

This course will guide participants through a process of designing online instruction for adult learners, applicable for a variety of content areas and settings. Building upon a research-based instructional design model, participants will plan online learning experiences that combine pedagogy, organization, design, and technology. Participants will be able to design media-enhanced, engaging online activities and assess learning.

ED.880.633.  Curriculum Development.  3 Credits.  

In this course, participants will propose a curricular project in health professions education, which will be documented in their professional portfolio. They will learn and apply six steps to curriculum development: problem identification and general needs assessment, targeted needs assessment, writing goals and specific measurable objectives, choosing educational strategies, implementation, and evaluation. Educational methods include readings, mini-lectures, interactive web modules, discussion groups, and application exercises. The course also addresses issues related to curriculum maintenance and enhancement and dissemination of curriculum-related work.

ED.880.635.  Instructional Strategies I.  1.5 Credits.  

In this course, participants will learn about various instructional strategies to enhance interdisciplinary learning experiences in health professions education. Instructional methods will include such collaborative educational models as small and large group teaching, team-based, interactive and experiential case-based learning. Techniques will include the use of simulations as well as teaching at the bedside with a focus on educator behaviors that stimulate achievement of learners. With an appreciation of the diversity of the student body, participants will effectively integrate and apply technology into instruction to develop and deliver health professions curricula, including web-based teaching environments, content management systems, collaborative project development, and interactive media with an emphasis on instructional design advancements which affect the learning environment. Evidence of participants’ knowledge and application of course topics will be captured in a professional portfolio.

ED.880.639.  Development, Management, and Evaluation of Health Professions Education Programs.  3 Credits.  

In this course, participants will demonstrate their ability to implement a systemic approach to program development and evaluation. They will review the literature on program effectiveness and examine the components that contribute to success. They will also approach program development from the perspective of its critical components – population characteristics, needs assessment, content, logistics, instructional formats, implementation, assessment, and evaluation using quantitative and qualitative methods. In addition, participants will incorporate a continuous process of program improvement that includes closing the loop by analyzing information on student performance, stakeholders, trends, and funding to identify changes that will enhance the effectiveness of the program. Course products and reflections will be highlighted in a professional portfolio.

ED.880.642.  Leadership Theory in Action for Health Professions Educators.  3 Credits.  

Leadership extends beyond management and involves multiple skills. This course addresses: 1) organizational change theory and the leadership of change; 2) leadership of tasks/processes/systems (including principles of task management and the use of strategic planning, quality improvement, policy/procedure and data to achieve organizational goals and promote efficiency); and 3) resource management and creation (including financial management, fund raising, alignment of resource use and development with function and goals).

ED.880.652.  Survey Design for Research in Health Professions Education.  1.5 Credits.  

This course will examine Survey Design. Surveys wield tremendous impact on decision-making and are becoming increasingly common when evaluating educational processes, conducting research, and in society more broadly. The major topics of the course will include defining constructs; creating items and item wording; response anchors; formatting surveys; and bolstering response rates. The course will also cover some basic design features of Qualtrics, a leading survey software system. Students do not need to have any previous experience with developing surveys to be successful in this course. The course is targeted toward 1) students who are actively adapting or developing survey measures for research projects and 2) students who are interested in professionally designing surveys. The course is more orientated toward collecting quantitative data, but only minimal knowledge of data analysis is needed.

ED.880.673.  Leadership Capstone in Health Professions Education II: Implementation and Results.  1.5 Credits.  

Participants will engage in a three-course series capstone to culminate the MEHP program. They will employ principles and concepts from their MEHP educational experiences to develop, implement, and disseminate a research or evaluation project focused on an issue of importance to health professions education. Their projects will be performed under the guidance of assigned capstone instructors and the director with support from fellows’ institutional sponsors. In the second course fellows will implement the project by following prescribed design, implementation, and evaluation guidelines. They will conduct the process, collect data, and select appropriate statistical tools for data analysis. They will submit as amendments to Hopkins IRB any modifications to the project components that require IRB approval.Fellows continue preparation of scholarly manuscripts of their work for peer-reviewed dissemination or potential publication. Fellows submit deliverables according to the course schedule to their instructors and consult as needed with their institutional sponsors. Fellows continue to add evidence to their Specialization Portfolio.

ED.880.674.  Leadership Capstone in Health Professions Education III: Analysis, Discussion, Conclusion, Dissemination.  1.5 Credits.  

Participants will engage in a three-course series capstone to culminate the MEHP program. They will employ principles and concepts from their MEHP educational experiences to develop, implement, and disseminate a research or evaluation project focused on an issue of importance to health professions education. Their projects will be performed under the guidance of assigned capstone instructors and the director with support from fellows’ institutional sponsors. In this third course fellows will complete data analysis, construct tables and figures, develop the discussion, identify limitations, write the conclusion, close the Hopkins IRB, and prepare the manuscript for submission to a target journal. They will create a Voice Thread presentation of their project. Fellows complete the Specialization Portfolio including the final program reflection.Fellows complete their scholarly manuscript of their work for peer-reviewed dissemination or potential publication. Fellows submit deliverables according to the course schedule to their instructors and consult as needed with their institutional sponsors.

ED.880.676.  Research Capstone in Health Professions Education I: Problem, Gap, Hook, and Methods.  1.5 Credits.  

Participants will engage in a three-course series capstone to culminate the MEHP program. They will employ principles and concepts from their MEHP educational experiences to develop, implement, and disseminate a research or evaluation project focused on an issue of importance to health professions education. Their projects will be performed under the guidance of assigned capstone instructors and the director with support from fellows’ institutional sponsors. In the first course of the series, fellows will focus on the identification of a problem of urgent concern, establish a gap in the current knowledge or thinking about the problem, and articulate a compelling hook to convince readers that this gap requires attention. They will explore the literature to identify the methodology, the method, and instruments for the project. They will prepare and submit the IRB for their home institutions and prepare the Hopkins IRB for their instructor to submit as the project PI. This course will be complete with the receipt of Hopkins IRB approval.Fellows begin preparation of a scholarly manuscripts of their work for peer-reviewed dissemination or potential publication. Fellows submit deliverables according to the course schedule to their instructors and consult as needed with their institutional sponsors. They also submit progress on their overarching Specialization Portfolio. Fellows may build on educational projects begun in previous courses with the approval of their instructors.

ED.880.677.  Research Capstone in Health Professions Education II: Implementation and Results.  1.5 Credits.  

Participants will engage in a three-course series capstone to culminate the MEHP program. They will employ principles and concepts from their MEHP educational experiences to develop, implement, and disseminate a research or evaluation project focused on an issue of importance to health professions education. Their projects will be performed under the guidance of assigned capstone instructors and the director with support from fellows’ institutional sponsors. In the second course fellows will implement the project by following prescribed design, implementation, and evaluation guidelines. They will conduct the process, collect data, and select appropriate statistical tools for data analysis. They will submit as amendments to Hopkins IRB any modifications to the project components that require IRB approval.Fellows continue preparation of scholarly manuscripts of their work for peer-reviewed dissemination or potential publication. Fellows submit deliverables according to the course schedule to their instructors and consult as needed with their institutional sponsors. Fellows continue to add evidence to their Specialization Portfolio.

ED.880.678.  Research Capstone in Health Professions Education III: Analysis, Discussion, Conclusion, Dissemination.  1.5 Credits.  

Participants will engage in a three-course series capstone to culminate the MEHP program. They will employ principles and concepts from their MEHP educational experiences to develop, implement, and disseminate a research or evaluation project focused on an issue of importance to health professions education. Their projects will be performed under the guidance of assigned capstone instructors and the director with support from fellows’ institutional sponsors. In this third course fellows will complete data analysis, construct tables and figures, develop the discussion, identify limitations, write the conclusion, close the Hopkins IRB, and prepare the manuscript for submission to a target journal. They will create a Voice Thread presentation of their project. Fellows complete the Specialization Portfolio including the final program reflection.Fellows complete their scholarly manuscript of their work for peer-reviewed dissemination or potential publication. Fellows submit deliverables according to the course schedule to their instructors and consult as needed with their institutional sponsors.

ED.881.611.  Action Research for School Improvement.  3 Credits.  

Students explore the role of the educator as an action researcher, with special emphasis on formulating and refining research questions as well as on selecting appropriate methodologies for classroom or school-based research. Students review research as a tool for assessing and improving teaching/learning environments.

ED.885.501.  The Gifted Learner.  3 Credits.  

Graduate students survey a historical overview of gifted education and examine research literature, intelligence theorists, and current practices used with gifted learners to gain perspective on the academic, social, and affective nature and manifestations of giftedness. Special needs populations are examined for unique characteristics and needs to further support the premise of a diverse gifted audience. Emphasis will be placed on gifted learning characteristics as they inform identification, planning, and support strategies. Participants explore the potential role they play in working with gifted youth, recommending program delivery options, and the identification process.

ED.885.505.  Creativity in Education.  3 Credits.  

Graduate students will examine the psychological and educational aspects of creative thinking. Participants review studies of the characteristics of creative children and adults, the creative process, and the identification of potentially creative children and adolescents. The course introduces teaching strategies and curriculum materials for fostering creative behavior at both the elementary and secondary school levels.

ED.885.510.  Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment for Advanced Learners.  3 Credits.  

Graduate students explore the various approaches to differentiating curriculum, instruction, and assessment for advanced learning. Strategies and techniques that are supported by research and best practice are discussed and analyzed. Candidates design interventions that translate theories about gifted education into practice in their education contexts.

ED.885.512.  Twice Exceptional Learners.  3 Credits.  

Graduate students review recent research-based findings regarding identification and programming for the gifted child with learning differences. Candidates consider appropriate strategies and teaching techniques that address learning challenges as well as the development of enriched content and accelerated and innovative approaches for maximization of potential in areas of giftedness.

ED.885.515.  Leadership of Gifted Education and Talent Development Programs.  3 Credits.  

Graduate students will learn how to develop, implement, and supervise interventions for gifted students in both K-12 and out-of-school settings. An emphasis is placed on how talent identification, service delivery, student assessment, and program evaluation are included in the design of talent development systems.

ED.885.519.  Seminar I in Gifted Education and Talent Development.  3 Credits.  

Graduate students will explore current issues, research, and trends in gifted education and talent development at the local and national levels, including ways to advocate for programs and services, and the roles of a leader in the field.

ED.885.520.  Seminar II in Gifted Education and Talent Development.  3 Credits.  

Graduate students will expand upon knowledge gained in Seminar I as they continue to explore current issues, research, and trends in gifted education and talent development at the local and national levels, including ways to advocate for programs and services, and the roles of a leader in the field.

ED.885.604.  Social and Emotional Needs of the Gifted.  3 Credits.  

Graduate students will examine the unique social and emotional needs of gifted and talented learners and their families. Primary emphasis will be on consultation, guidance and counseling strategies for use with diverse gifted learners including those from special populations.

ED.885.720.  Research in Gifted Education and Talent Development.  3 Credits.  

Graduate students who have competed their general coursework in Gifted Education and Talent Development may register for this capstone course with their adviser’s approval. This course provides an opportunity for graduate students who are not pursuing the MSDE state Gifted and Talented Specialist certificate to conduct research and pursue a special project related to their area of interest under the guidance of the instructor. In collaboration with the instructor, a personalized project will be developed and implemented. Graduate students will select a current issue or problem of practice in the field of gifted education or talent development, conduct a review of the literature, design an intervention or research proposal to address the issue, create and share a written product to inform the community on the issue.

ED.885.820.  Practicum in Gifted Education and Talent Development.  3 Credits.  

Candidates participate in a capstone supervised practicum experience in an educational setting with a focus on advanced learners under the direction of the faculty. Practicum experiences will be individually designed in consultation with the student's advisor to address the student's professional goals. Individual and small group consultation sessions are held. ( 3 credits)

ED.887.615.  Explorations in Mind, Brain, and Teaching.  3 Credits.  

During the past decade, the learning sciences have produced a vast frontier of knowledge on how the brain processes, stores, and retrieves information. Educators have increasingly recognized a role as consumers of this emerging knowledge. Participants in the course will review this research, examining how it intersects with the correlates of a model of research-based effective teaching including the teaching of the arts across content areas. Topics of study will include the brain’s memory systems, the impact of emotions on learning, the processes involved in higher order thinking and learning, and issues related to child development. Participants will apply course studies to the creation of learning units that emphasize application of knowledge and the integration of the arts. ( 3 credits)

ED.887.616.  Fundamentals of Cognitive Development.  3 Credits.  

This introductory course surveys theoretical and empirical work in the study of cognitive development. A variety of methodological approaches are addressed, with a focus on cognitive processes related to learning. The course proceeds from behaviorist, cognitivist, and sociocultural perspectives of the early and mid- 20th century to recent and ongoing research in the neuro- and cognitive sciences. Topics include the development of language, motivation, and intelligence, as well as the acquisition of skills and concepts related to mathematics, reading, writing, and problem-solving. Implications for education are considered.

ED.887.617.  Neurobiology of Learning Differences.  3 Credits.  

This course is intended to prepare educators with information about how differences and disabilities in brain development impact the abilities of school aged children and adolescents to participate in instructional activities. Particular attention is given to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), specific learning disabilities (SLD), attention deficit disorder and attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADD and ADHD), and psychiatric disorders that are found in the constellation of disabling conditions identified as emotional disturbance (ED). The course will include case studies of students with each disabling condition, with a focus on how the disability affects learning, the current status of imaging technologies, and the current uses of medications for assisting students in school settings. Students taking this course will review research and link information from lecture to the creation of an instructional unit demonstrating knowledge of how a disabling condition can be accommodated in school.

ED.887.618.  Cognitive Processes of Literacy & Numeracy.  3 Credits.  

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study, discuss and explore aspects of brain function that influences learning, remembering, and utilizing textual and numeric concepts. The inter-relationship of developmental factors, prior knowledge, instructional design and implementation, and assessment mandates will be investigated and discussed. Current research, differentiated strategies, technologies and the impact of disabilities will be included.

ED.887.619.  Special Topics in Brain Sciences.  3 Credits.  

This capstone course addresses specific topics in brain research and encourages the participants to apply research to inform instructional practices.

ED.893.508.  Technology and the Science of Learning.  3 Credits.  

Technologies are part of the intellectual landscape in which new kinds of knowledge are breaking down the boundaries of previous distinct disciplines. The design and use of new technologies make possible new approaches to learning, new contexts for learning, new tools to support learning, and new understandings of the dynamics of the learning process itself. This course examines the role of technology relative to the key concepts of active learning, metacognition, and transfer of knowledge from multidisciplinary perspectives on learning. Based on their readings of empirical literature from the science of learning, students will develop and implement a technology-related strategy that aligns educational technology to standards-based instruction, promote problem solving and higher-order thinking skills, facilitate cooperative learning, and use reflective teaching and inductive approaches to increase student achievement. Students must take Technology and the Science of Learning as one of their first courses in the program.

ED.893.545.  Technology Integration for the 21st Century Learner.  3 Credits.  

This course prepares educators in K-12 and adult education settings to implement instruction and assessment that targets four essential digital-age learning objectives: critical thinking, creativity, communication, and collaboration. Students will learn about and apply the TPACK framework, which describes three forms of knowledge educators need to integrate educational technologies into instruction effectively - technical knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and content knowledge. Alongside the TPACK framework, students will learn about and apply the SAMR Model, which describes four different types of educational technology integration: Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, and Redefinition. Applying their understanding of TPACK, SAMR, and other concepts and practices from course readings and activities, students will design technology-rich learning activities/learning units for use in their own professional settings.

ED.893.546.  Technology for Learner Variability.  3 Credits.  

This course provides an overview of the historical foundations and the advancements in the learning sciences related to learner variability. Students will learn to apply the Universal Design for Learning framework in understanding and addressing learning variability. Students will develop the knowledge and skills necessary to anticipate and plan for systematic differences in learners, and apply technology to that end. Students will investigate existing and emerging technologies to determine how these may support all learners in becoming purposeful and motivated, resourceful and knowledgeable, and strategic and goal-directed.

ED.893.550.  Emerging Issues in Digital Age Learning.  3 Credits.  

The new digital landscape is drastically changing how people work, collaborate and learn. New innovations in digital technologies are powerful influences in 21st century classrooms. In this course, participants are exposed to emerging issues for Internet-based culture and digital age learning, including gaming, virtual and augmented reality, digital libraries and databases, big data and data mining, and the use of social media and digital tools for enhancing instructional delivery. Learners will explore the use of emerging technologies and their integration into schools and organizations. ( 3 credits)

ED.893.600.  Maker Education: Cultivating Curiosity, Creativity, and Problem Solving in Thoery and Practice.  3 Credits.  

Maker Education is an educational approach and culture that emphasizes collaboration and community-mindedness, and uses hands-on, project-based learning methods to demonstrate student learning. Well-designed and implemented maker activities and curricula promote creativity, problem-solving, experimentation, and collaboration, as well as content learning, and they are often connected to STEM and STEAM initiatives. In this course, students will learn and apply theoretical principles for Maker Education and the culture of making. They will investigate tools and strategies that hold promise for engaging and empowering learners of all ages in maker-related activities. Students will develop authentic learning experiences that support inclusive and equitable access to technology and maker education for diverse learners in a range of learning environments. Students will also become familiar with critiques of maker education, formulate plans to integrate maker activities with “traditional” learning activities, and develop rubrics to assess student learning with maker activities.

ED.893.601.  Evaluation and Research in Digital Age Learning.  3 Credits.  

In this course students learn and practice the skills necessary to evaluate the use of educational technology in learning environments and educational settings. The course covers a range of alternative and mixed methods for data collection, such as observation, interviewing, the use of surveys, and analysis of data. Students develop an evaluation plan that can be implemented in their own educational settings and demonstrates their ability to select and/or develop appropriate metrics to identify the impact of technology in the teaching-learning process. Students use empirical methods to describe, explore, and/or explain the relationships between technology and program and/or individual outcomes.

ED.893.628.  Gaming and Simulations for Learning.  3 Credits.  

This course provides an overview of game-based learning theories and best practices for incorporating educational games and simulations into a range of learning environments. Students will learn to apply analytic frameworks to commercial and educational games so as to evaluate a game's potential as a learning tool or environment for K-18, business, and government settings. Students will integrate games with lessons and other learning activities, as well as produce prototypes for their own educational games and plan to use gameplay data for assessment.

ED.893.632.  Data-Driven Decision Making.  3 Credits.  

The increasing impact of a knowledge economy and globalization has been a catalyst to the fields of knowledge management and organizational decision making. This course is designed to introduce knowledge management concepts into an educational context and to provide an in depth focus on data-driven decision making in educational organizations and institutions. Participants investigate how decisions and strategies are developed and how tacit or explicit knowledge can be identified, captured, structured, valued and shared for effective use. Course topics include leadership and strategic management relative to organizational decision making, managerial and organizational structures, organizational learning, and decision support systems. A related intent is to develop an understanding of data mining metrics that can be used to create predictive models that support systemic change in schools. Opportunities are provided for participants to use online and electronic tools that can assist in facilitating meaningful conversations about instruction and learning among their school's faculty and staff.

ED.893.634.  Technology Leadership for School Improvement.  3 Credits.  

Education leaders need to understand the use of technology for teaching, learning, and managing their school environment. These skills include schoolwide technology planning and leadership that incorporate instructional design, curriculum integration with standards, logistics of technology implementation, professional development, and evaluation. Students will develop an understanding of how to create and support technological change through a systems approach. Topics include sources of resistance to change, tools for planning, decision making and change, creating and supporting a culture for learning and change, and managing and institutionalizing change systems.

ED.893.645.  Explorations in Blended and Hybrid Learning.  3 Credits.  

In this course, students will become familiar with different models of blended learning, discuss how blended learning differs from “technology integration,” and examine the potential for blended learning instructional models to provide learners with more personalized learning experiences. Students will evaluate and compare different blended learning models to justify their rationale for selecting models appropriate for their teaching and learning contexts. They will describe instructional strategies and technologies that can be used to increase learner engagement in blended learning environments. Through course readings and their own analyses, students will also examine challenges associated with the implementation of blended learning activities and the impact that implementation has on students, teachers, schools, or stakeholders in other workplace contexts. While exploring these topics, students will to choose a path for their learning based on their teaching and learning context. The course will culminate with students designing their own blended learning initiative that is authentic to their teaching and learning context.

ED.893.650.  Fundamentals of Design Thinking.  3 Credits.  

This foundational course in the DALET program, to be taken during a student's first term of enrollment, operationalizes principles of design thinking, instructional design, and learning theories to equip learners with foundational knowledge and skills for designing learning experiences in a range of contexts. Throughout the course, students will independently and collaboratively engage in the multiple phases of an iterative design cycle (framing, ideation, prototyping, testing and evaluating) to create human-centered design prototypes to address specific learner/user needs. Students will leave the course with a set of practical tools and techniques to design innovative design solutions within their own professional setting.

ED.893.651.  Computational Thinking for K-12 Educators.  3 Credits.  

In 2006, Jeannette Wing published a seminal paper on computational thinking, arguing that “it represents a universally applicable attitude and skill set everyone, not just computer scientists, would be eager to learn and use.” This course will provide an overview of computational thinking (CT), in theory and in practice, with an emphasis on its use in different K–12 disciplines and contexts. Students will investigate CT theories, CT measures, the benefits of building CT competencies, and approaches to developing CT in many different disciplines. Students will work with a variety of tools, including the Scratch block programming environment, to explore how these can be used to develop CT competencies among their learners, and create a long-term plan for nurturing CT in their particular context.

ED.893.701.  Advanced Seminar in Digital Age Learning.  3 Credits.  

The seminar is the capstone course in the Digital Age Learning and Educational Technology master's program and reflects students’ individual mastery for leveraging technology with diverse learning populations. The seminar focuses on examining the constructs of educational technology topics and culminates in the student creation of his/her online portfolio. The portfolio showcases the products and skills developed by learners during the core courses throughout the term of their academic studies. The goals of the seminar are to engage and support participants in understanding the historical, cognitive, technical, political, and sociological issues involved in the effective use of technology in education and particularly in the integration of technology into instruction.

Prerequisite(s): ED.893.601

ED.893.850.  Advanced Applications in Digital Age Learning.  3 Credits.  

The advanced applications course provides students the opportunity to individualize their program experience, to sharpen existing skills, to gain new skills, and to pursue their educational technology interests related to curriculum and professional development in support of technology-based programs. Students work with their advisor to create a professional, customized learning experience that stretches the student through his/her participation in the development, design, implementation, or evaluation of high-quality technology products, projects, or services. The activities in this course are aligned to individual students' schedules and can include collaborative opportunities with public and private sector organizations and agencies that have local, regional, national, or international interests. This course supports the development of leadership expertise in an area designated by the student as a set of skills needed to advance the individual in their chosen area of study and professional practice.

Counseling & Human Services

ED.860.666.  Applied Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.  3 Credits.  

This course covers advanced issues in the real-time application of the theories of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) to the treatment and treatment planning of the most commonly diagnosed DSM-5 disorders. Building on the theoretical learning objectives in the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy course, the emphasis of this course will be on the development and application of CBT-based techniques and skills to clinical cases presented by the students.

Prerequisite(s): ED.860.639[C] AND ED.861.609[C]

ED.863.526.  Introduction to Play Therapy with Children.  3 Credits.  

The major goal of this course is to facilitate students' knowledge, dispositions and skills to counsel children through play therapy and other major theoretical applications. Students' learning will be facilitated through didactic presentations, interactive discussions, and supervised counseling practice with elementary school children. This course also emphasizes the counselor's collaborative work with children's legal guardians/family members. (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): ED.861.507

Innovative Teaching & Leadership

ED.810.602.  Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in School Settings.  3 Credits.  

Students consider the philosophical, historical, and psychological foundations for elementary and secondary school curriculum and explore the linkages between assessment-based curriculum and instructional strategies. After examining the scope and sequence of the K-12 curriculum, students evaluate options presented in various school reform plans and contemporary research findings in effective schools and effective instruction. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.603.  Methods of Teaching in the Elementary School: Part I.  3 Credits.  

This course is designed for candidates in the elementary education certification program. Students explore strategies for teaching mathematics, language arts, and the aesthetic areas of music, art, and physical education in the elementary school. Activities, materials, and technology address the varying developmental and learning needs of elementary school children and examine ways of integrating aspects of the curriculum. Participants engage in lesson planning and micro-teaching activities for teaching problem solving and higher order thinking skills. This course includes uses of the Internet to obtain curricular resources. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools.

ED.810.604.  Methods of Teaching in the Elementary School: Part II.  3 Credits.  

This course is designed for candidates in the elementary education certification program. Students explore strategies for teaching social studies with an integration of language arts, and the aesthetics areas of music, art, and physical education in the elementary school. Activities, materials, and technology address the varying developmental and learning needs of elementary school children and examine ways of integrating aspects of the curriculum. Participants engage in lesson planning and microteaching activities for teaching problem solving and higher order thinking skills. This course includes uses of the Internet to obtain curricular resources. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools.

ED.810.606.  Human Development and Learning.  3 Credits.  

This course integrates key insights into current theory and practice in human growth and development and educational psychology (learning). Participants analyze a variety of learner characteristics that influence student development and academic achievement. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.607.  Culturally Responsive Teaching.  3 Credits.  

Candidates will explore the social, organizational, and structural factors influencing educational opportunities, experiences, and outcomes of culturally diverse students. Through personal reflection and analysis, candidates will determine the best way for them to positively impact students, regardless of ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, etc. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (2-3 credits)

ED.810.611.  Methods of Teaching in Secondary English: Part I.  3 Credits.  

Students will use their subject area content expertise to design effective lesson and unit plans that apply significant concepts and understandings as defined by local, state, and national curriculum and professional standards. Discipline appropriate pedagogy will be the focus of instructional delivery as course content when taken into the internship classroom. In both Part I and Part II, unit plans will be developed and assessed. Part I will focus on planning and the integration of standards and content and classroom management. Part II will expand upon this focus and will also include an emphasis on instructional technology and differentiation for students with special needs.

ED.810.612.  Methods of Teaching in Secondary Mathematics: Part I.  3 Credits.  

Students will use their subject area content expertise to design effective lesson and unit plans that apply significant concepts and understandings as defined by local, state, and national curriculum and professional standards. Discipline appropriate pedagogy will be the focus of instructional delivery as course content when taken into the internship classroom. In both Part I and Part II, unit plans will be developed and assessed. Part I will focus on planning and the integration of standards and content and classroom management. Part II will expand upon this focus and will also include an emphasis on instructional technology and differentiation for students with special needs.

ED.810.613.  Methods of Teaching in Secondary Science: Part I.  6 Credits.  

Students will use their subject area content expertise to design effective lesson and unit plans that apply significant concepts and understandings as defined by local, state, and national curriculum and professional standards. Discipline appropriate pedagogy will be the focus of instructional delivery as course content when taken into the internship classroom. In both Part I and Part II, unit plans will be developed and assessed. Part I will focus on planning and the integration of standards and content and classroom management. Part II will expand upon this focus and will also include an emphasis on instructional technology and differentiation for students with special needs.

ED.810.614.  Methods of Teaching in Secondary Social Studies: Part I.  3 Credits.  

Students will use their subject area content expertise to design effective lesson and unit plans that apply significant concepts and understandings as defined by local, state, and national curriculum and professional standards. Discipline appropriate pedagogy will be the focus of instructional delivery as course content when taken into the internship classroom. In both Part I and Part II, unit plans will be developed and assessed. Part I will focus on planning and the integration of standards and content and classroom management. Part II will expand upon this focus and will also include an emphasis on instructional technology and differentiation for students with special needs.

ED.810.621.  Special Topics in Secondary English.  3 Credits.  

The purpose of this course is to improve prospective teachers' content knowledge in English. Students explore specific topics in English through seminar discussions, research, projects, and classroom application assignments. Topics are content-focused and vary each semester with the needs of the students. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)<P><I>Notes: </I>Open only to students admitted to Master of Arts in Teaching program.

ED.810.622.  Special Topics in Mathematics.  3 Credits.  

The purpose of this course is to improve prospective teachers' content knowledge in mathematics. Students explore specific topics in math through seminar discussions, research, projects, and classroom application assignments. Topics are content-focused and vary each semester with the needs of the students. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)<P><I>Notes: </I>Open only to students admitted to the Master of Arts in Teaching program.

ED.810.623.  Special Topics in Science.  3 Credits.  

The purpose of this course is to improve prospective teachers' content knowledge in science. Students explore specific topics in science through seminar discussions, research, projects, and classroom application assignments. Topics are content-focused and vary each semester with the needs of the students. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)<P><I>Notes: </I>Open only to students admitted to the Master of Arts in Teaching program.

ED.810.624.  Special Topics in Secondary Social Studies.  3 Credits.  

The purpose of this course is to improve prospective teachers’ content knowledge in social studies. Students explore specific topics in social studies through seminar discussions, research, projects, and classroom application assignments. Topics are content-focused and vary each semester with the needs of the students. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)<P><I>Notes: </I>Open only to students admitted to the Master of Arts in Teaching program.

ED.810.631.  Methods of Teaching in Secondary English: Part II.  3 Credits.  

Students will use their subject area content expertise to design effective lesson and unit plans that apply significant concepts and understandings as defined by local, state, and national curriculum and professional standards. Discipline appropriate pedagogy will be the focus of instructional delivery as course content when taken into the internship classroom. In both Part I and Part II, unit plans will be developed and assessed. Part I will focus on planning and the integration of standards and content and classroom management. Part II will expand upon this focus and will also include an emphasis on instructional technology and differentiation for students with special needs.

ED.810.632.  Methods of Teaching in Secondary Math: Part II.  3 Credits.  

Students will use their subject area content expertise to design effective lesson and unit plans that apply significant concepts and understandings as defined by local, state, and national curriculum and professional standards. Discipline appropriate pedagogy will be the focus of instructional delivery as course content when taken into the internship classroom. In both Part I and Part II, unit plans will be developed and assessed. Part I will focus on planning and the integration of standards and content and classroom management. Part II will expand upon this focus and will also include an emphasis on instructional technology and differentiation for students with special needs.

ED.810.633.  Methods of Teaching in Secondary Science: Part II.  3 Credits.  

Students will use their subject area content expertise to design effective lesson and unit plans that apply significant concepts and understandings as defined by local, state, and national curriculum and professional standards. Discipline appropriate pedagogy will be the focus of instructional delivery as course content when taken into the internship classroom. In both Part I and Part II, unit plans will be developed and assessed. Part I will focus on planning and the integration of standards and content and classroom management. Part II will expand upon this focus and will also include an emphasis on instructional technology and differentiation for students with special needs.

ED.810.634.  Methods of Teaching in Secondary Social Studies: Part II.  3 Credits.  

Students will use their subject area content expertise to design effective lesson and unit plans that apply significant concepts and understandings as defined by local, state, and national curriculum and professional standards. Discipline appropriate pedagogy will be the focus of instructional delivery as course content when taken into the internship classroom. In both Part I and Part II, unit plans will be developed and assessed. Part I will focus on planning and the integration of standards and content and classroom management. Part II will expand upon this focus and will also include an emphasis on instructional technology and differentiation for students with special needs.

ED.810.640.  Supervised Internship and Seminar in the Elementary Schools.  6 Credits.  

Students spend a minimum of a semester in appropriate elementary school settings under the guidance and direct supervision of a certified teacher and/or a university supervisor, depending upon the program format. A support seminar meets to enable students to discuss and reflect upon their experiences. Emphasis is placed on applying concepts, techniques, and theories learned in courses and other structured learning experiences to classroom settings. Supervisors provide guidance in the application of rigorous content in developmentally appropriate ways. Participants reflect, continue to develop their portfolios, and prepare for portfolio presentations. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools.

ED.810.641.  MAT Clinical Practice for Elementary Candidates: Part I.  2 Credits.  

This school based experience is designed to provide MAT candidates with an opportunity to work with public and private school students in diverse settings. Hosting sites (Professional Development Schools and partnership schools) serve as clinical laboratories where students begin a minimum 100-day internship where they can observe how pupils learn, discover appropriate teaching strategies, plan lessons, implement teaching methods, as well as develop classroom management skills. This course is aligned with the expectations of the Maryland Common Core. This course provides an opportunity to practice clinically while being guided by an experienced master teacher and university faculty.

ED.810.642.  MAT Clinical Practice for Elementary Candidates: Part II.  3 Credits.  

This school-based experience is designed to provide MAT candidates with an opportunity to continue working with public and private school students in diverse settings. Hosting sites (Professional Development Schools and partnership schools) serve as clinical laboratories where students complete their minimum 100-day internship observing how pupils learn, practicing appropriate teaching strategies, planning lessons, implementing teaching methods, as well as refining classroom management skills. Students will complete their professional portfolio with evidence acquired in this course. This course is aligned with the expectations of the Maryland Common Core. This course provides an opportunity to practice clinically while being guided by an experienced master teacher and university faculty.

Prerequisite(s): ED.810.641

ED.810.645.  Supervised Internship and Seminar in the Secondary Schools.  6 Credits.  

Students spend a minimum of one semester in appropriate secondary school settings under the guidance and direct supervision of a certified teacher and/or a university supervisor, depending upon the program format. A support seminar meets to enable students to discuss and reflect upon their experiences. Emphasis is placed on applying concepts, techniques, and theories learned in courses and other structured learning experiences to secondary classroom settings. Supervisors provide guidance in the application of rigorous content in developmentally appropriate ways. Participants reflect, continue to develop their portfolios, and prepare for portfolio presentations. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools.

ED.810.646.  MAT Clinical Practice for Secondary Candidates: Part I.  2 Credits.  

This school-based experience is designed to provide MAT candidates with an opportunity to work with public and private school students in diverse settings. Hosting sites (Professional Development Schools and partnership schools) serve as clinical laboratories where students begin a minimum 100-day internship where they can observe how pupils learn, discover appropriate teaching strategies, plan lessons, implement teaching methods, as well as develop classroom management skills. This course is aligned with the expectations of the Maryland Common Core. This course provides an opportunity to practice clinically while being guided by an experienced master teacher and university faculty.

ED.810.647.  MAT Clinical Practice for Secondary Candidates: Part II.  3 Credits.  

This school-based experience is designed to provide MAT candidates with an opportunity to continue working with public and private school students in diverse settings. Hosting sites (Professional Development Schools and partnership schools) serve as clinical laboratories where students complete their minimum 100-day internship observing how pupils learn, practicing appropriate teaching strategies, planning lessons, implementing teaching methods, as well as refining classroom management skills. Students will complete their professional portfolio with evidence acquired in this course. This course is aligned with the expectations of the Maryland Common Core. This course provides an opportunity to practice clinically while being guided by an experienced master teacher and university faculty.

Prerequisite(s): ED.810.646

ED.810.660.  Teacher as Thinker and Writer.  3 Credits.  

Novice teachers will reflect upon and write about their teaching experiences as a means of improving their teaching practice. They will employ a variety of writing forms to reflect on their different roles and contexts required of them in their classrooms, schools, and communities. Each class session will serve as a writing workshop with collaborative activities designed to generate pieces of writing (expository, narrative, descriptive, imaginative, and dramatic). (3 credits)

ED.810.665.  In the Age of Change: School Reform in the United States.  3 Credits.  

This course examines reform movements across the United States. School reform occurs at many different levels, from the classroom level with individual teachers, to the national level with federal mandates. We will explore reform at different levels and analyze the theory, policies, practices, and controversies of various mechanisms of reform, including the K-8 movement, small high schools, school choice (charters and vouchers), mayoral control, community schools and federal reform initiatives. Participants will synthesize information about school reform in the United States schools and systems and will reflect on their role in this process. Final evaluation of reform strategies will be grounded in the effect these reforms are having on improving learning for all students across the United States schools.

ED.810.679.  Classroom Management.  2 Credits.  

Students consider the practical ways of managing the classroom by examining organizational techniques, procedures and routines, and teaching strategies that help foster appropriate student behavior. Class members investigate management styles and discipline models to develop their own framework for effective classroom management. (2-3 credits)

ED.811.603.  Special Education: Promises and Challenges I.  1 Credit.  

This course provides: (a) an overview of the characteristics of students with exceptional learning needs and (b) the field’s history, laws, procedures and trends. This is a foundational course in special education that will allow participants to explore the state of special education in the United States today and its impact on urban education.

ED.811.604.  Special Education: Promises & Challenges II.  1 Credit.  

This course examines a framework for understanding key concepts in inclusion as they relate to the academic, social, and emotional development of all learners. This course encourages participants to consider the cultural and linguistic issues that influence students' needs as well as families' understanding of special education services.

ED.811.608.  Building Productive and Nurturing Classroom Communities II.  1 Credit.  

In this course, participants will continue to explore models of community building practices for their classrooms that will demonstrate inclusivity and respect for all students. The course emphasizes reinforcement techniques to support student needs and behavior while diving deeper into culturally responsive and restorative discipline approaches. Participants are supported in developing their philosophies for building classroom communities that will support student voice and independence while fostering family and community relationships. Participants will practice enacting reinforcement techniques while developing appropriate systems to use in the clinical setting.

ED.811.612.  Introduction to Assessment and Tiered Instruction.  2 Credits.  

This course examines teaching and learning for students with exceptional learning needs in the general education classroom, with specific attention to the role of informal assessment and subsequent differentiation in response to findings. Foci include: (a) best practices for nondiscriminatory assessment, (b) practice administering group and individual informal assessments, (c) knowing how, when, and why to vary learning environments, learning activities, and content, and (d) implementing Tier 1 accommodations/modifications and Tier 2 interventions to support student learning opportunities.

ED.811.614.  Small Group Practicum (Secondary).  2 Credits.  

Practicum is designed to provide participants with an opportunity to work intensively with a small group of students from the host classroom by assessing and analyzing data as well as planning and teaching data-driven lessons. Participants will progress monitor students over the course of the 12+ weeks of small group instruction. The primary goal of the practicum experience is to increase student academic performance. A secondary goal is to provide participants with sufficient opportunities to enact the pedagogy of highly effective mathematics teachers. For mathematics practicum, participants will maintain a working group of 3–4 students across the entire semester, five days a week, and for 30–45 minutes per day, utilizing the Do the Math Now! intervention program. Do the Math NOW! focuses on mathematics topics that are typically taught at grades 6–8 and which—if not mastered—can later interfere with success in secondary mathematics at grades 7–12.

ED.811.615.  Formal Assessment and Designing Individualized Education Programs.  1 Credit.  

This course provides review of measurement statistics and practice with the administration, scoring, and interpretation of commonly used norm-referenced instruments and procedures for determination of eligibility for special education. Comparisons are made with informal assessment results, and ways to communicate results are discussed. Writing a formal report based on multiple data points is explained and detailed. The IEP process, from referral to eligibility determination and placement, is examined.

ED.811.616.  Understanding and Managing Behavior.  2 Credits.  

An overview of behavior management is presented within the framework of understanding the context and function of behavior, as well as developing systems that promote prosocial behaviors in the classroom. Residents will consider the interactions of people, environments, and responses to behaviors as factors that influence student behavior. Residents will also demonstrate understanding of Functional Behavior Assessments (FBA) and develop a Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) as a method to address challenging behaviors.

ED.811.617.  Specialized Instructional Techniques.  2 Credits.  

Participants will investigate Tier 3 interventions in literacy, math, and behavior to establish how they differ from the kind of support that students already receive, the evidence base for them, the factors that would need to be considered to implement them, the ways in which they are implemented, and the ways to monitor their effectiveness.

ED.811.618.  Clinical Residency I.  2 Credits.  

Fellows are expected to reflect on their many opportunities to develop and refine their instructional practice and classroom management skills in a whole class setting as well as plan and deliver targeted tiered instruction. Fellows are expected to implement the content and skills developed through coursework and the inherent clinical experiences in a comprehensive manner during their first year as a teacher of record. Fellows will examine the evolution in their unit and lesson planning throughout the year and draw conclusions that inform their ongoing ability to plan targeted, rigorous, and engaging lessons.

ED.811.623.  Building Productive and Nurturing Classroom Communities I.  1 Credit.  

In this course, participants will be introduced to and practice the implementation of techniques for building classroom communities that are inclusive, equitable, and culturally responsive to all students. During the course, the participants will explore and critique multiple models of behavior management and modification, analyze the behavioral theories behind them, and practice techniques that support culturally relevant behavioral and learning outcomes. Participants will practice the fundamentals of building classroom communities, such as building responsive rapport with their students, enacting strong teacher presence, crafting and delivering explicit directions, and engaging in positive narration and restorative discipline. Participants will develop routines and procedures for implementation in the clinical setting.

ED.811.625.  Emergent Literacy.  3 Credits.  

This course will prepare participants for teaching literacy in early grades classrooms. Participants will be immersed in the instructional methodology that support the social, cultural, cognitive, and linguistic aspects of young children's reading and writing development in the classroom. Emphasis will be placed on utilization of assessment and its data to guide instructional planning aligned to K-2 standards. Additionally, participants will explore ways technology and new literacies practices can be used to support and enhance instruction.

ED.811.628.  Intermediate Literacy.  2 Credits.  

This course will prepare participants for teaching literacy in intermediate grades classrooms. Participants will be immersed in instructional methodology that supports the development of literacy in grades 3–6. Emphasis will be placed on the teaching of reading and writing as a means of developing comprehension, critical analysis, and discourse of fiction and nonfiction text. Additionally, participants will focus on the selection and utilization of relevant complex digital and print materials.

ED.811.630.  Supporting Writer's Development.  2 Credits.  

This course prepares participants for the thoughtful examination of students as writers and writing instruction. Throughout the course, participants will be introduced to strategies and skills they can use to enhance their own writing and the writing of their students. Using a process approach, participants will learn how to teach students to communicate ideas effectively in a variety of genres, for different purposes, and for diverse audiences. Data generated from student writing samples will be used to plan lessons, monitor progress, provide on going feedback, and differentiate instruction. Explicit attention will be given to sentence composing and the use of mentor texts and exemplars to support writing achievement.

ED.811.631.  Elementary S.T.E.M. Methods.  3 Credits.  

This course is an introduction to teaching inquiry-based science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics in grade level K-5. Participants will examine the practice of science by determining what it means to understand science and be scientifically literate, recognizing the importance of teaching scientific inquiry and process skills, and learning to create 5E inquiry lessons to promote meaningful science instruction; identify disciplinary core ideas by learning some science together, engaging in scientific inquiry just as you might do with your students, and considering inaccurate thinking children (and adults) have about specific science concepts; and use crosscutting concepts when designing thematic lessons. Emphasis will be placed on designing and evaluating instruction and curriculum in terms of how they effectively promote inquiry, critical, and design thinking.

ED.811.632.  Small Group Literacy Practicum.  2 Credits.  

Participants plan for and deliver small group differentiated instruction. The small group instructional experience prepares participants for intervention instruction. The small group instructional experience prepares participants for intervention instruction to students who need additional academic support(s). Participants are expected to implement the appropriate constructs and models for teaching and learning that they have acquired throughout coursework.

ED.811.640.  Secondary ELA Immersion and Discourse.  3 Credits.  

This course models a productive and nurturing classroom environment. Participants become completely immersed in their own learning about reading and writing, speaking and viewing, and discussing texts of all kinds. For each sequence of instruction, participants debrief the learning and the instructor’s onstage/offstage decision making. Participants also develop and present lessons that are closely aligned to the Common Core State Standards.

ED.811.641.  Language Acquisition.  2 Credits.  

Participants will look deeply at three major topics that are important to supporting linguistically and culturally diverse students in urban, secondary education settings: language variation, academic language, and second language acquisition. Participants will explore these interrelated topics, attending to both socio-cultural and cognitive-linguistic perspectives on learning and learning environments. The purpose of the course is to guide educators to use linguistic awareness to inform their teaching. Participants will examine state standards andthe role of language in assessment and learning.

ED.811.642.  Reading Diagnosis and Intervention.  2 Credits.  

In this course, participants will deepen their understanding of reading processes, methods of reading assessment, and reading intervention strategies. They will assess students’ skills and knowledge in word recognition, fluency, vocabulary, and reading comprehension, and prepare lessons in response to students’ needs. To ensure effective management and clear communication with colleagues and caregivers during the first semester as lead instructors, participants will prepare thorough plans for classroom procedures related to reading assessment and instruction, and they will develop careful scripts for conferences. Course sessions will include time for collaborative lesson planning.

ED.811.643.  Writing in the Secondary Classroom.  3 Credits.  

This course prepares participants for the thoughtful examination of writers and writing instruction. Throughout the course, participants will be introduced to strategies and skills they can use to enhance the writing of their students. Using a process approach, participants will learn how to teach students to communicate ideas effectively in a variety of genres, for different purposes, and for diverse audiences. Explicit attention will be paid to reading and writing connections, and technology will be used to explore new literacy practices. Data will be used to plan lessons, monitor progress, provide on-going feedback, and differentiate instruction.

ED.811.644.  Genre Study I: Argument and Informational Texts.  3 Credits.  

In this course participants will be immersed in reading and writing informational and argumentative texts. Participants will analyze texts to identify the characteristics, structures, and techniques commonly used in a variety of texts within each genre. Participants will develop comprehension lessons in each genre and will develop a unit that integrates reading and writing of informational and argumentative texts. To support the development of the unit, participants will explore a wide range of texts for their quality, complexity, and the diverse roles they play in secondary English-Language Arts. Participants will examine how the texts being used in conjunction with it, through the process of reading and then designing original multi-modal, multi-genre text sets with a focus on informational and argumentative texts.

ED.811.646.  Genre Study II: Poetry, Drama, and the Novel.  3 Credits.  

What we reads determines our reading process, and adolescents need opportunities to read, respond to, and write in different genres. By gaining an understanding of the structures and conventions of a variety of genres, students improve their reading comprehension. First as learners and then as teachers, participants will read and analyze texts in four genres: novel, short story, poetry and drama. These readings will include contemporary texts and those traditionally taught at the secondary level. Emphasis will be placed on fostering and developing student stamina and engagement. Participants will (1) study the major components used within these genres; (2) investigate the reading, writing, and critical-thinking skills required of students when reading and responding to complex texts; (3) identify the challenges unique to teaching diverse learners; and (4) conceptualize, design, and implement a thematic unit that incorporates at least three genres.

ED.811.650.  Secondary Math Immersion.  3 Credits.  

This course is designed to provide participants with an overview of mathematical thinking and reasoning put forth in the Common Core State Standards for grades 6-12. Participants will experience first-hand a mathematics learning environment that places a premium on students’ mathematical sense-making. The overarching goal of this course is to immerse participants in the kind of high cognitive demand math learning experiences they will ultimately provide for their own students. Participants will not only leave this course with lasting images of high quality mathematics instruction, they will also be able to connect those images to specific exemplary teacher behaviors articulated in the Urban Teachers' Teacher Practice Rubric.

ED.811.651.  Proportional Reasoning.  3 Credits.  

Participants will work with their small group teaching assignments to integrate ideas of proportional thinking, such as using a factor-of-change, a ratio table, cross-multiplication, and scaling up and down. This work with their students will provide an opportunity for exploring ways to identify a student's level of understanding for proportional thinking, such as the ability to differentiate between additive and multiplicative relationships, and developing tasks and activities that will correct and deepen that understanding.

ED.811.652.  Algebra, Functions, and Modeling in the Real World.  3 Credits.  

This course aims to provide participants with a rich understanding of essential conceptsundergirding high school algebra, functions and the modeling process. Participants considercritical components of how students in grades 6-12 develop algebraic thinking and skill, beyondtraditional focus on algebraic manipulations. An in-depth focus on functions in the course allowsparticipants to systematically explore and analyze patterns, change and relationships amongquantities in everyday events and problems in life and society. Participants will further theiralgebra experience by exploring functions as fundamental mathematics objects that allow us tomodel real life situations. Understanding and applying components of the modeling process allows participations to examine authentic real-world situations by building mathematical models and applying solutions using the lens of culturally relevant pedagogy and social justice mathematics.

ED.811.653.  Math Methods I.  2 Credits.  

This course is designed to provide participants with initial structure and resources to provide a framework for teaching that includes data collection, case analysis, small group instruction, whole group paired and individual instruction. Participants will discuss effective methods for lesson planning, incorporating the needs of students with IEPs and 504 plans, and assessment. Participants will have the opportunity to rehearse lessons prior to implementation and respond to feedback.

ED.811.655.  Math Methods II.  2 Credits.  

This course will continue the work done in Math Methods I around planning, collaborating, data collection, self-assessment, rehearsal, revision of lessons to suit students’ needs, and general support. Participants will continue to receive guidance on addressing the Specially Designed Instruction (SDI) needed for students with IEPs and 504 plans. This course will focus on issues arising in the participants’ clinical work providing effective math instruction to a diverse group of learners.

ED.811.656.  Practices Concepts, and Core Ideas in Secondary Science (6-12).  3 Credits.  

This course integrates space, engineering, technology, and physical, life, and earth science. Participants will experience inquiry as learners and doers of science and demonstrate knowledge of the practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas articulated in the Next Generation Science Standards at the middle and high school levels. Participants will reflect on their planning and delivery of science, the science teaching of others, themselves as learners of science, and the opinions of science experts.(3 credits)

ED.811.661.  Secondary Classroom Management Seminar.  1 Credit.  

This course will focus on introductory exposure to classroom management through readings, discussion, practice, and reflection. Participants will develop an understanding of effective classroom management systems by actively implementing strategies in a summer classroom placement. Participants will also be introduced to the concept of the school-to-prison pipeline and its relationship to classroom management and disciplinary practices. Participants will learn about and understand how effective classroom management strategies, procedures, and strong student-teacher relationships can help counteract the school-to-prison pipeline.

ED.811.665.  Trauma Informed Teaching Practices.  1 Credit.  

This course is designed to help participants develop skills to support students who have experienced trauma. Participants will also examine current research about trauma-sensitive classroom environments that promote student learning and interpersonal skills for coping with trauma.

ED.811.667.  Social Studies Inquiry: Content Area Reading and Writing.  2 Credits.  

This online course will engage participants in the inquiry process as learners. Participants apply this process as they design and plan a thematic social studies inquiry unit that supports students in becoming agents of change in the communities in which they reside through historical, cultural, political, and geographical exploration. Specific attention is given to developing rigorous and meaningful units of study to support students in developing relevant content knowledge through multimodal texts using content area and disciplinary literacy practices. Participants will utilize their understanding of literacy practices from previous coursework and social studies methodology to support students in achieving the goals of this unit of study.

ED.811.670.  Race, Culture, and Equity in Urban Education.  2 Credits.  

In this course, residents will be prompted to see themselves as diversity advocates who understand and respect differences among learners in their classrooms, schools, and organizations. They will explore how by first understanding their own beliefs and biases they can then begin to better understand those around them; particularly those they have chosen to serve – students. They will learn that in order to become effective teachers who will build upon the strengths and skills of urban students and their families and communities they will need to build healthy, meaningful relationships and promote academic achievement. Residents will also explore the intersection of beliefs and practices through the examination of various learning theories and frameworks for effective, culturally responsive instruction.

ED.811.671.  Reading, Writing, and Language Development.  2 Credits.  

This course provides a foundational understanding of the ways children develop in the areas of reading, writing, speaking and listening. Participants will be immersed in the social and cultural perspectives related to literacy development, the developmental stages of literacy, the five components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) and instructional methods and materials for supporting the literacy development of students with diverse language and learning needs.

ED.811.672.  Numbers, Operations, and Algebraic Reasoning.  2 Credits.  

This course focuses on building the content understandings and pedagogical skills to teach elementary mathematics. Participants investigate the procedures, concepts, models, and representations that are required to understand our base-ten number system and operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. Additionally, participants will experience and plan for Mathematics Workshops as a structure for implementing equitable, high quality mathematics teaching and learning. Participants will rehearse and plan effective teacher moves for facilitating a student-centered Mathematics Workshop lesson. Particular attention is also given to unpacking standards, identifying quality math tasks, and planning instruction which places emphasis on the representation and communication of student mathematical thinking and reasoning. Participants will also rehearse, plan, and implement effective teacher behaviors that foster student engagement in the eliciting and synthesis of mathematical ideas.

ED.811.673.  Counting & Cardinality.  1 Credit.  

This course focuses on the scope and sequence of mathematics concepts and skills and developmentally appropriate environments for young learners. Participants will learn about the learning trajectories for number sense, counting, and cardinality. Participants will engage young learners in academic discourse to uncover student thinking and to assess student readiness. Participants will also examine, plan, and implement instructional routines that engage young learners—including examining and discussing appropriate models and manipulatives to support the acquisition of automaticity, fluency, and conceptual understanding.

ED.811.674.  Small Group Math Practicum.  2 Credits.  

Small Group Practicum is designed to provide participants with a rigorous opportunity to work intensively with a small group of elementary students to provide Tier 2 mathematics intervention instruction using the Number Sense Screener, Number Sense Interventions, Do the Math, or a specialized program for pre-k. Participants learn how to assess and analyze the mathematical skills and knowledge of their students using appropriate diagnostics from the intervention program. Participants will practice using pre-test data to plan and implement Tier 2 mathematics lessons. Participants will monitor the progress of students over the course of the 12+ weeks of small-group instruction with the goal of monitoring the student achievement and attendance of 3–4 children. Mathematics intervention instruction, excluding assessments, occurs 4–5 days a week, for 45 minutes per day, for 12+ weeks (i.e., a total of 45 hours).

ED.811.675.  Geometry for Elementary Grades.  2 Credits.  

In this course, participants will be immersed in the progression of the standards for geometry in grades K–5. Participants will acquire knowledge about the theoretical model of geometric understanding (Van Hiele) and use this to select a math task aligned to standards, develop lesson plans, and analyze and use student performance data to inform future instruction. Emphasis will be placed on identifying community assets and resources and leveraging those assets to plan geometry instruction that is real-world, authentic, and meaningful for elementary learners. Participants will demonstrate their understanding of geometric progression in the standards, levels of geometric understanding, and community assets by developing a week-long unit.

ED.811.676.  Measurement and Data.  2 Credits.  

This course focuses participants on developing understanding of the strands of mathematical proficiency involved in concepts of measurement and data in grades K–5. Participants are immersed in the progression of the measurement and data standards aligned to the state standards for mathematics at grades K–5. Emphasis is placed on participants examining the crosscutting mathematics concepts that are connected to measurement and data topics (e.g., Algebraic Reasoning or Number & Operations). Participants acquire strategies for helping students monitor their learning, rehearse the planning of lessons that embed choice options (process), and differentiate the demonstration of learning for students (product).

ED.811.677.  Motivation and Engagement of Adolescent Readers and Writers.  1 Credit.  

In this course, participants will examine the factors that support engagement and motivation of adolescent readers and writers. Adolescents have distinct identities that inform their relationship to reading and writing, identities that have been formed over the course of many years of experiences in schools. Participants will identify ways to positively engage and motivate students as readers and writers. This work is essential for students entering secondary grades with negative academic identities informed by prior academic experiences. Increasingly negative identities are inversely associated with future academic outcomes. By unpacking the factors that impact identity, motivation, and engagement, participants will be equipped to design lessons that positively support positive identity formation by their students.

ED.811.678.  Data and Community: Statistics and Probability in Action.  2 Credits.  

This course combines an exploration of fundamental principles of data science with essential concepts in K-12 statistics and probability. Participants explore the place and prevalence of real-world data and examine how data is gathered, represented, analyzed and utilized to drive decision-making in today’s world. In the course, participants use statistical tools and work with data to uncover patterns that impact our communities and the world at large. Integrating social justice standards as a basis for problem- solving through statistics and probability empowers participants, and subsequently the students they teach, to be able to unveil data patterns in their communities and lived experiences. Integrating the use of the statistical thinking process, data science and probability will help participants and their students to analyze and respond to individual and institutional bias and injustice.

ED.811.679.  Adolescent Development and Urban Youth.  1 Credit.  

This course is designed to build an understanding of adolescent development and apply that knowledge to practice as teachers of adolescent learners. It is intended to create teachers who are more informed and better prepared to respond to the abilities, behaviors, and needs of adolescent learners. To that end, residents will explore adolescent development through an examination of their physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional development. In addition, as teachers of adolescents in urban communities, they will also examine how issues related to race and gender identity inform and impact the development of nurturing and productive classroom environments that create inclusive learning spaces for all students

ED.813.601.  Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching: Part I.  1 Credit.  

In the Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching, educators will determine what transformational teaching looks like in the unique context of their field experience: classroom, school, and community. Each session will focus on specific topics that educators will evaluate for alignment with their vision of transformational teaching. Finally, they will develop a plan of action to apply within their own context. Topics may include the attributes of exemplary teachers, services of community organizations, and characteristics of today’s learners.

ED.813.602.  Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching: Part II.  1 Credit.  

In the Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching, educators will determine what transformational teaching looks like in the unique context of their field experience: classroom, school, and community. Each session will focus on specific topics that educators will evaluate for alignment with their vision of transformational teaching. Finally, they will develop a plan of action to apply within their own context. Topics may include the attributes of exemplary teachers, services of community organizations, and characteristics of today’s learners.

Prerequisite(s): ED.813.601

ED.813.603.  Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching: Part III.  2 Credits.  

In the Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching, educators will determine what transformational teaching looks like in the unique context of their field experience classroom, school, and community. Each session will focus on specific topics that educators will evaluate for alignment with their vision of transformational teaching. Finally, they will develop a plan of action to apply within their own context. Topics may include the attributes of exemplary teachers, services of community organizations, and characteristics of today’s learners.

Prerequisite(s): ED.813.602

ED.813.604.  Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching: Part IV.  2 Credits.  

Teach For America corps members are required to attend a Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching course all four semesters while in the corps. This course will develop corps members’ competencies in the Teaching as Leadership (TAL) framework, the TAL impact model, and our developing understanding of transformational teaching. While much of a corps members’ university development is rooted in instructional methods and teacher execution, the Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching course develops teachers’ ability to foster the more enduring qualities of access, advocacy, and habits of mind. Additionally, the students in this class will be observed once per quarter via a video-based online protocol.

Prerequisite(s): ED.813.603

ED.813.611.  Classroom Management: Part I.  1 Credit.  

In this course, educators will gain a deep understanding of basic classroom management approaches including skills to maintain organized and efficient learning environments through classroom procedures and routines. Further, teachers will study motivation theory and apply the research in their own classrooms. This course focuses on how to drive students to invest in their own academic success and be self-motivated in school and beyond.

ED.813.612.  Classroom Management: Part II.  2 Credits.  

In this course, educators learn advanced strategies to help students become self-motivated to drive their own academic growth and future life options. By studying motivation theory, educators develop plans to support the individual learning and behavioral needs of all students, even those who may be disruptive in class. Educators use their own unique classroom experiences to further their professional growth and learning in this course.

Prerequisite(s): ED.813.611

ED.813.621.  Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I: General Educators.  3 Credits.  

In this course, educators will acquire the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices in teaching and learning. Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. Educators will select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher.

ED.813.622.  Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning II: General Educators.  3 Credits.  

In this course, educators will build upon the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices acquired in Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I. Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. With guidance from advisors and coaches, educators select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher.

Prerequisite(s): ED.813.621

ED.813.631.  Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I: Special Educators.  3 Credits.  

In this course, educators will acquire the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices in teaching and learning. Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. Educators will select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher. Special educators will also receive differentiated instruction to address the specific needs of their classrooms.

ED.813.632.  Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning II: Special Educators.  3 Credits.  

In this course, educators will build upon the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices acquired in Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I. Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. With guidance from advisors and coaches, educators select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher.

Prerequisite(s): ED.813.631

ED.813.641.  Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I: ESOL Educators.  3 Credits.  

In this course, educators will acquire the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices in teaching and learning. Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. Educators will select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher. Further, elements of effective ESOL education will be highlighted.

ED.813.642.  Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning II: ESOL Educators.  3 Credits.  

In this course, educators will build upon the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices acquired in Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I. Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. With guidance from advisors and coaches, educators select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher.

Prerequisite(s): ED.813.641

ED.813.651.  Introduction to Education Budgeting.  3 Credits.  

Educational leaders must be equipped to analyze and create budgets and other financial tools in order to fully realize their vision of high quality instruction in high performing schools. This course will introduce students to the fundamental principles of budgeting for educational institutions and provide them with a set of basic skills to create and analyze budgets in their specific professional context.

ED.813.652.  Introduction to Global Education Policy and Analysis.  3 Credits.  

The course provides an introduction to international comparisons of education systems as it reviews the history, comparisons and the educational systems in Europe, Asia and the OECD countries. International education systems and policies are examined on the local and national levels. Methodologies for comparison are explored. Education leaders will become knowledgeable of the systems in competitor countries in order to make their schools academically competitive in the global economy.

ED.813.653.  Current Issues in Educational Leadership.  3 Credits.  

Today’s educational leaders are confronted with a myriad of diverse issues on a daily basis. Those issues traditionally include governance, academic affairs and resources. In the current education environment, leaders must also be prepared to act on issues concerning accountability, accessibility, technology, competition and community partnerships as well as quickly changing local, state and federal policies. This course will introduce students planning to pursue careers as education leaders, in both K-12 and higher education, to the issues and pressures they will encounter in real time. After receiving instruction in a broad overview of a number of important current issues, students are asked to examine case studies and develop leadership strategies to manage these high profile education issues.

ED.813.654.  Race, Power and Policy in Education.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the intersections of race, power and policy and their impact on education. The course is designed to review historical and systematic drivers of racial and social class inequality in American education. Through this course, students will examine various theories, concepts, principles, and dynamics of race, power, and policy and how these ideas apply to and impact education, organizations, and communities with the intent of acting as advocates and change agents to eradicate racial inequalities to a solutions based orientation.

ED.813.661.  Assessment for Reading Instruction for Young Children.  3 Credits.  

This course presents foundational concepts of assessment in reading as well as the various types and purposes of emergent and beginning reading assessments. Educators will plan and implement research-based reading assessments and use assessment data to make educational decisions and inform early literacy instruction. Educators will use effective techniques for communicating assessment results to peers, students, and parents.

Prerequisite(s): You may not enroll in this course if you have previously enrolled in 813.662 course or have 813.662 course on your enrollments for this semester already.

ED.813.662.  Assessment for Reading Instruction.  3 Credits.  

This course presents foundational concepts of assessment in reading as well as the various types and purposes of literacy assessment. Educators will plan and implement research-based reading assessments and use assessment data to make educational decisions and inform literacy instruction. Educators will use effective techniques for communicating assessment results to peers, students, and parents.

Prerequisite(s): You may not enroll in this course if you have previously enrolled in 813.661 course or have 813.661 course on your enrollments for this semester already.

ED.813.664.  Portfolio Development, Part I: Teacher Growth.  

The course is part one of the yearlong process, requiring monthly submissions from the candidates and communication with a portfolio coach to support them as they develop their Master’s portfolio. (0 credit)

ED.813.665.  Portfolio Development, Part II: Student Growth.  

The course is part two of the yearlong process, requiring monthly submissions from the candidates and communication with a portfolio coach to support them as they develop their Master’s portfolio. (0 credit)

Prerequisite(s): ED.813.621 OR ED.813.631 OR ED.813.641;ED.813.622 OR ED.813.632 OR ED.813.642;ED.813.681 OR ED.813.682;ED.813.611 AND ED.813.612

ED.813.666.  Instruction in Reading for the Young Child.  3 Credits.  

This course presents research-based approaches to developing a comprehensive literacy program for children at varying stages of literacy development. Early childhood educators will incorporate into their daily lessons effective practices to promote language and literacy development, including concepts of print, phonological and phonemic awareness, word recognition (e.g., phonics and spelling), fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing. This course focuses on accelerating literacy development through early intervention strategies. Also emphasized are strategies for involving families and the community in support of the literacy program.

Prerequisite(s): You may not enroll in this course if you have previously enrolled in 813.667 course or have 813.667 course on your enrollments for this semester already,

ED.813.667.  Instruction in Reading.  3 Credits.  

This course presents research-based approaches to developing a comprehensive literacy program for students at varying stages of literacy development. Educators will incorporate into their daily lessons effective practices to promote language and literacy development, including phonological and phonemic awareness, word recognition (e.g., phonics and spelling), fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing. This course focuses on accelerating literacy development in students with low reading achievement through early identification and intervention strategies. Also emphasized are strategies for involving families and the community in support of the literacy program.

Prerequisite(s): You may not enroll in this course if you have previously enrolled in 813.666 course or have 813.666 course on your enrollments for this semester already.

ED.813.668.  Materials for Teaching Reading to the Young Child.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on evaluation and selection of reading materials for a comprehensive early literacy program. Early childhood educators will learn and apply effective practices for selecting, evaluating, and organizing texts and materials, including informational and digital texts and resources, for a variety of purposes of reading. Attention will be given to evaluating quality of literature, addressing diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, leveling systems, intervention and family support, and children’s interests and motivation.

Prerequisite(s): You may not enroll in this course if you have previously enrolled in 813.669 course or have 813.669 course on your enrollments for this semester already.

ED.813.669.  Materials for Teaching Reading.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on evaluation and selection of reading materials for a comprehensive literacy program. Educators will learn and apply effective practices for selecting, evaluating, and organizing texts and materials, including informational and digital texts and resources, for a variety of purposes of reading. Attention will be given to evaluating quality of literature, addressing diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, leveling systems, intervention and family support, and student interest and motivation.

Prerequisite(s): You may not enroll in this course if you have previously enrolled in 813.668 course or have 813.668 course on your enrollments for this semester already.

ED.813.681.  Teaching for Transformation I: Secondary Content.  3 Credits.  

In this course, educators in grades 6-12 will take a three-part journey to advancing their knowledge and skills as secondary instructional leaders. They will: 1) learn and apply effective practices for conducting action research in the classroom to inform teaching and learning; 2) engage in a process for providing students access to opportunities otherwise unavailable to them that will inspire students to become lifelong learners and make productive and fulfilling life choices; and 3) build upon their knowledge and skills in content area teaching and learning to become strategic instructional decision makers, increase their self-efficacy in the classroom, and improve student learning and achievement. Emphasis will be on synthesizing learning, reflective practice, and professional growth.

ED.813.682.  Teaching for Transformation I: Elementary Content.  3 Credits.  

In this course, educators in grades PreK-5 will take a three-part journey to advancing their knowledge and skills as elementary instructional leaders. They will: 1) learn and apply effective practices for conducting action research in the classroom to inform teaching and learning; 2) engage in a process for providing students access to opportunities otherwise unavailable to them that will inspire students to become lifelong learners and make productive and fulfilling life choices; and 3) build upon their knowledge and skills in content area teaching and learning to become strategic instructional decision makers, increase their self-efficacy in the classroom, and improve student learning and achievement. Emphasis will be on synthesizing learning, reflective practice, and professional growth.

ED.813.683.  Teaching for Transformation II: Secondary Content.  3 Credits.  

In this course, educators in grades 6-12 will take a three-part journey to advancing their knowledge and skills as secondary instructional leaders. They will: 1) learn and apply effective practices for conducting action research in the classroom to inform teaching and learning; 2) engage in a process for providing students access to opportunities otherwise unavailable to them that will inspire students to become lifelong learners and make productive and fulfilling life choices; and 3) build upon their knowledge and skills in content area teaching and learning to become strategic instructional decision makers, increase their self-efficacy in the classroom, and improve student learning and achievement. Emphasis will be on synthesizing learning, reflective practice, and professional growth.

Prerequisite(s): ED.813.681

ED.813.684.  Teaching for Transformation II: Elementary Content.  3 Credits.  

In this course, educators in grades PreK–5 will take a three-part journey to advancing their knowledge and skills as elementary instructional leaders. They will: 1) learn and apply effective practices for conducting action research in the classroom to inform teaching and learning; 2) engage in a process for providing students access to opportunities otherwise unavailable to them that will inspire students to become lifelong learners and make productive and fulfilling life choices; and 3) build upon their knowledge and skills in content area teaching and learning to become strategic instructional decision makers, increase their self-efficacy in the classroom, and improve student learning and achievement. Emphasis will be on synthesizing learning, reflective practice, and professional growth.

Prerequisite(s): ED.813.682

ED.851.512.  Politics of Education.  3 Credits.  

Federal involvement in education has grown enormously in recent decades with calls for national standards and increasing reliance on standardized tests. While state legislatures and school boards traditionally provide funding and policy, mayors, parents and advocates of charter schools are seeking to redefine the nature of local control. Education leaders should understand the politics of education; the swiftly changing balance of power; and how education politics is practiced between and within the levels of government and the public. Students will study and analyze current issues and case studies that focus on the politics of education.

ED.851.601.  Organization and Administration of Schools.  3 Credits.  

Students examine the role of the school administrator, with emphasis on instructional improvement, pupil development and services, school and community relations, administration of facilities and finance, professional development and services for staff, and organizational relationships and responsibilities. Participants will explore best practices for fostering student achievement.

ED.851.603.  School Law.  3 Credits.  

Participants explore the legal foundations and structure of education and consider contemporary issues based on legislation and court decisions. Students develop techniques of legal research and analyze a topic of interest.

ED.851.609.  Administrative and Instructional Uses of Technology.  3 Credits.  

Prospective and practicing school administrators examine the issues, ideas, and programs surrounding the use of technology as a tool for administration and instructional management. Through hands-on experience, participants explore practical uses for software that can be applied to their daily work.

ED.851.616.  Issues in K-12 Education Policy.  3 Credits.  

This course provides an introduction to and an overview of several key and rapidly expanding areas of educational policy research, teacher effectiveness, teacher labor markets and teacher policy. The goals of this course are to familiarize students with some of the most current research in these areas, and to encourage and support students to develop skills as critical consumers of empirical work and policy debates in educational policy.

ED.851.642.  Leadership in Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment for Independent Schools.  3 Credits.  

Students examine curriculum theory, design, and content and their relation to instruction and assessment as applied to independent schools. Topics include: curriculum and the independent school mission statement; K-12 curriculum scope and sequence; leadership of curriculum change; curriculum mapping and its implications; methods of assessment; interdisciplinary curriculum development; culturally responsive curriculum, instruction, and assessment; and differentiation of curriculum and instruction. Participants apply course content by developing a plan for curriculum implementation in their own schools.

ED.851.643.  Supervision and Professional Development for Personnel in Independent Schools.  3 Credits.  

Students examine models of instructional supervision, including clinical supervision and various approaches to personalizing supervisory strategies appropriate for independent schools. Emphasis is on development of an annual, school-based professional development plan; alignment of instructional goals with the supervision and evaluation of teachers; delegation of supervisory roles; recruitment, retention, and support of faculty and staff in independent schools; designing teacher incentives, recognition, and award programs; and using the principles of high-quality professional development to enhance teachers' knowledge and skills. Students apply concepts to practical situations in clinical observations.

ED.851.644.  Public Relations, Marketing, and Fund-raising for Independent Schools.  3 Credits.  

Students explore the importance of public relations, marketing principles, and fund raising to independent school success. Topics include: maintaining positive community relations; management of admission policies and procedures; operation of public relations and publicity functions; coordination of relations with other independent schools; facilitating relations with educational, governmental, and social service agencies; and fund-raising strategies. Students analyze and critique various strategies through case studies and discussion.

ED.851.645.  Governance of Independent Schools.  3 Credits.  

Students learn to facilitate positive working relationships within the board of trustees and build effective partnerships between the board and the school's faculty and staff. Topics include: setting, communicating, and evaluating progress toward annual goals; strategic planning with faculty, staff, and board members; establishing structures for boards to accomplish their work; reporting effectively to boards on important issues and concerns; models for evaluating the head of school; models for evaluating board performance and contributions of individual board members; developing trustees as effective school advocates; and managing crises. Students gain an understanding of the pressures exerted from multiple constituencies, finding ways to base decisions on what is good for students, what is good for the institution, and what is consistent with their own values.

ED.851.646.  Business Management and Finance for Independent Schools.  3 Credits.  

Students learn to apply business principles and financial processes that are the foundation for successful independent school management. Content includes: oversight of independent school budgets; understanding of tuition and other revenue sources; knowledge and effective use of endowments, financial aid, and loans; understanding of major expenses; annual budget planning; grasping the legal and ethical implications of financial management; developing salary scales and policies; using principles of strategic, long-range planning; and facilities planning, maintenance, and management. Applications include case studies for identifying and resolving common problems and challenges.

ED.851.705.  Effective Leadership.  3 Credits.  

Students review the principles and techniques required of principals, assistant principals, and teacher leaders. The course emphasizes diagnosis of the school climate, principles of inclusive leadership, motivation of faculty teams, and the dynamics of working in and with groups to accomplish school improvement goals. Emphasis is placed on the leader’s role in creating a collaborative vision/mission for a school and in establishing meaningful working relationships with the larger community.

ED.851.708.  Systemic Change Process for School Improvement.  3 Credits.  

Students examine the literature on systemic change in schools, with an emphasis on the roles of the teacher leader. Topics include planning, implementing, and evaluating the change process for school improvement.

ED.851.809.  Seminar in Educational Administration and Supervision.  3 Credits.  

Students prepare and present a seminar paper on a problem in educational administration or supervision. The paper includes a comprehensive literature review, an assessment of implications for administrative and supervisory behavior, and an implementation plan for addressing the problem in an educational setting. Students engage in case study analyses, role playing, and assessment exercises.

Prerequisite(s): ED.851.601 AND ED.851.603 AND ED.851.705 AND ED.852.602 AND ED.881.611 AND ED.881.622 AND ED.881.610

ED.851.810.  Internship in Administration and Supervision.  3 Credits.  

Students participate in a supervised practicum experience where they demonstrate the application of knowledge, dispositions, competencies, skills and solutions to day-to-day activities performed by practicing administrators or supervisors. Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 observation and performance hours aligned with leadership standards. Experiences are reflective of real and simulated field-based activities in a variety of educational settings. Students must complete a final internship reflection paper, as well as a comprehensive portfolio that includes artifacts that are illustrative of their best work.

ED.851.814.  Internship in Administration and Supervision.  3 Credits.  

Students participate in a supervised practicum experience where they demonstrate the application of knowledge, dispositions, competencies, skills and solutions to day-to-day activities performed by practicing administrators or supervisors. Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 observation and performance hours aligned with leadership standards. Experiences are reflective of real and simulated field-based activities in a variety of educational settings. Students must complete a final internship reflection paper, as well as a comprehensive portfolio that includes artifacts that are illustrative of their best work.

ED.852.602.  Supervision and Professional Development.  3 Credits.  

Students examine models of instructional supervision, including clinical supervision and various approaches to personalizing supervisory strategies. Emphasis is on supervision skills, including the assessment of teacher performance, effective conferring strategies, and working with teachers to construct instructional improvement plans. Students apply concepts developed to practical situations in laboratory sessions.

ED.871.501.  Introduction to Children and Youth with Exceptionalities.  3 Credits.  

Students investigate the major areas of exceptionality addressing the characteristics and educational needs of students with a broad range of special instructional needs. Students review incidence and etiology, diagnostic and instructional services, educational continuum of programs, and findings of recent research. (3 credits)

ED.871.502.  Educational Alternatives for Students with Special Needs.  3 Credits.  

Designed especially for general educators, counselors, supervisors, and administrators, this course examines differentiated instruction for students with special needs in general education classrooms. Students review the legal foundations and requirements of special education and the collaborative role of general and special educators in the implementation of individualized educational programs in general education classrooms. (3 credits)

ED.871.510.  Legal Aspects, Service Systems, and Current Issues in Special Education.  3 Credits.  

This survey course reviews litigated and legislated standards for special education and related services for persons with disabilities. Students explore current issues in the provision of services for persons with disabilities, including inclusion, the response to intervention (RTI), and regulations for eligibility. (3 credits)

ED.871.511.  Instructional Planning and Management in Special Education.  3 Credits.  

Students focus on the instructional and organizational skills necessary for teaching students who receive special education services. Topics of primary emphasis include developing effective individualized education plans; preparing and delivering exemplary lesson plans; and identifying instructional best practice strategies that promote effective classroom organization and instruction. Students create lesson plans using best practice strategies. (3 credits)

ED.871.512.  Collaborative Programming in Special Education.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on collaboration themes common to various educational settings: interpersonal communication, problem solving, cultural diversity, teamwork, and family systems theory. Students examine techniques that promote effective communication between teachers, school administrators and related professionals, and families of students with special needs. Co-teaching models that work effectively are also discussed. (3 credits)

ED.871.513.  Applied Behavioral Programming.  3 Credits.  

This course will focus on the methodology of applied behavior analysis including how the principles of behavior can be used to make changes and improvements in classroom behavior. Observational methods, single-subject designs, behavior promotion and reduction, and generalization strategies are reviewed in relation to the needs of students with disabilities. Students assess and develop individual behavior projects that demonstrate their ability to design, implement, and evaluate behavioral support programs in an ethically responsive manner. (3 credits)

ED.873.601.  Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis and Special Education.  3 Credits.  

This course provides introductory knowledge of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). Among the topics explored will be the scientific foundation on which ABA is built, the concepts and principles of behavior analysis, and an overview of the application of ABA in educational settings.

ED.873.602.  Research Methods: Evaluation, Measurement and Single Case Design.  3 Credits.  

The course will examine the methods of single subject research design, including defining and measuring behavior, data collection and interpretation of graphs, and single case research designs. Students will learn to utilize research methods to evaluate and measure the effectiveness of intervention and instructional procedures within an educational setting.

ED.873.603.  Behavioral Assessment and Intervention for Challenging Behaviors.  3 Credits.  

This course will investigate the principles and procedures of the field of applied behavior analysis as it relates to challenging behaviors. Observational methods, behavior promotion and reduction, and generalization strategies will be reviewed in relation to the needs of students with disabilities. Students will design, implement, and evaluate a behavior reduction program based on assessment results to decrease inappropriate behaviors for an individual student or a group of students in an educational setting.

Prerequisite(s): ED.873.601[C] OR ED.873.602[C]

ED.873.604.  Behavioral Assessment and Instructional Strategies.  3 Credits.  

The course will focus on developing effective teaching plans based on Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), exploring a variety of teaching strategies including discrete trial instruction, applied verbal behavior, shaping, chaining, direct instruction, precision teaching, personalized systems of instruction, incidental teaching, functional communication training, augmentative communication systems, programming for acquisition, generalization, and maintenance, and making data-based decision making to improve instruction. Students will design, implement and evaluate an instructional program based on assessment results to increase a desired behavior/skill for an individual student or a group of students in an educational setting. (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): ED.873.601[C] OR ED.873.602[C] OR ED.873.603[C]

ED.873.605.  Ethics and Professional Conduct for Behavior Analysts.  3 Credits.  

This course will provide discussion and examination of ethics and responsible conduct of behavior analysts with an in-depth review of the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2012). It will also include an overview of the behavior consultation model and examine the influence of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) on autism, developmental disabilities, and special education.

Prerequisite(s): ED.873.601[C] OR ED.873.602[C] OR ED.873.603[C]

ED.873.606.  Applications of Applied Behavior Analysis in the Classroom.  3 Credits.  

This course will provide in-depth discussion and strategies regarding the implementation of applied behavior analysis in the classroom setting. Strategies will focus on documentation of services, training, and monitoring of others in carrying out behavior change procedures, performance monitoring and procedural integrity, supervision, evaluating effectiveness of intervention and teaching, and maintaining behavior change in the natural environment. Students will learn and plan for unwanted effects of reinforcement, punishment, and extinction in a classroom setting. Students will also examine current issues in special education as they relate to the implementation of applied behavior analysis, including inclusion, effective data collection, choosing evidence-based practices, and discussing the benefits of behavior analysis with other professionals. Finally, the course will help candidates prepare for the Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA) exam. ( 3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): ED.873.601[C] OR ED.873.602[C] OR ED.873.603[C] OR ED.873.604[C] OR

ED.873.607.  Supervision and Consultation in ABA.  3 Credits.  

This course will focus on supervision and consultation as it applies to working with personnel within an educational setting (pre-k through 12th grade). The importance of behavior analytic supervision will be reviewed with a specific focus on building skills to develop the supervisor/supervisee relationship including establishing performance expectations, goal setting, training others in the implementation of behavioral procedures, performance monitoring, and evaluating supervision outcomes. Among the topics explored will be behavioral consultation professional practice guided by the science of behavior analysis, utilizing treatment integrity measures, data based decisions, and collaboration within a school environment.

ED.873.610.  Applied Behavior Analysis Practicum I.  3 Credits.  

The practicum is designed to meet the field experience requirements as outlined by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). This practicum provides supervised experiences in the application of behavior analytic services in educational setting. The practicum will also include a face-to-face seminar with an instructor. (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): ED.873.601 AND ED.873.602 AND ED.873.603 AND ED.873.605

ED.873.611.  Applied Behavior Analysis Practicum II.  3 Credits.  

The practicum is designed to meet the field experience requirements as outlined by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). This practicum provides supervised experiences in the application of behavior analytic services in educational setting. The practicum will also include a face-to-face seminar with an instructor. ( 3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): ED.873.601[ AND ED.873.602 AND ED.873.603 AND ED.873.604 AND ED.873.605

ED.874.512.  Characteristics of Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities: Learning Disabilities, Behavioral Disorders, and Intellectual Disabilities.  3 Credits.  

Students examine the incidence, etiology, and characteristics of students with learning disabilities, behavioral disorders, and intellectual disabilities, and review major theoretical models and instructional practices associated with each. (3 credits)

ED.874.513.  Educational Assessment of Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities: Elementary/Middle.  3 Credits.  

Students explore assessment instruments and procedures for diagnosing elementary and middle school students who are experiencing learning and behavior problems. Participants administer and interpret norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, and curriculum-based instruments that assess academic achievement, social behavior, and emotional functioning. (3 credits)

ED.874.514.  Educational Assessment of Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities: Secondary/Adult.  3 Credits.  

Students examine assessment instruments and procedures for diagnosing secondary level students who are experiencing learning and behavior problems in school. Students administer and interpret norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, and curriculum-based instruments that assess academic achievement, social-emotional behavior, and vocational functioning. (3 credits)

ED.874.524.  Spoken and Written Language: Methods for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities.  3 Credits.  

Students learn teaching strategies that can be used by teachers with students who have difficulty with oral and written expressive language. Instructional methods include both curriculum modifications and teacher-devised tasks. (3 credits)

ED.874.525.  Mathematics: Methods for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities.  3 Credits.  

Students examine effective instructional strategies for the remediation of problems frequently found in the mathematics performance of students with mild to moderate disabilities.

ED.874.526.  Classroom Management: Methods for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities.  3 Credits.  

This course reviews the theoretical foundations for developing practical interventions and management strategies to deal with inappropriate classroom behaviors, as well as strategies for individualized education program (IEP) development and implementation. Behavior modification, therapeutic strategies, social skills instruction, and communication principles are applied to the design and implementation of structured classroom management programs.

ED.874.527.  Career Assessment and Programming: Education of Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the assessment and instructional methods needed to implement and evaluate career transition and vocational programs that promote successful post-school adjustments for students with mild to moderate disabilities. Participants review the practice of vocational and career assessment, vocational instruction, vocational counseling, and the development of recreation and leisure skills and activities. (3 credits)

ED.874.528.  Diversifying the General Education Curriculum: Methods for Secondary Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities.  3 Credits.  

Students discuss the characteristics of adolescents with mild to moderate disabilities. Students review the goals of the secondary school and gain an understanding of the range of curricular demands and graduation requirements, and their impact on students with special needs. The implications of school organization and service delivery models for students with disabilities are explored. Students develop accommodations, modifications, co-teaching plans, and projects across secondary curricular content areas. (3 credits)

ED.874.541.  Reading: Methods for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities.  3 Credits.  

Students learn to apply strategies designed to improve the reading performance of elementary/middle school students with mild to moderate disabilities. Highlighted are strategies related to word identification and paraphrasing and methods such as progress monitoring and self-evaluation. During the course, students apply a strategy with a student who is experiencing reading difficulties. (3 credits)

ED.874.542.  Reading, English, and Language Arts: Methods for Secondary Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities.  3 Credits.  

Students learn to apply strategies designed to improve the reading and writing performance of secondary students with disabilities. Highlighted are strategies designed to maximize content area reading comprehension and writing within the content areas. During the course, students apply strategies with a secondary student or students experiencing reading difficulties. This course incorporates goals and objectives that correspond to the MSDE required course, ED.884.508 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Area, Part I. (3 credits)

ED.874.860.  Mild to Moderate Disabilities Internship: Induction - Elementary/Middle.  3 Credits.  

Designed for students seeking Maryland generic special education certification at the elementary/middle level, this internship, scheduled approximately midpoint in a student's program, provides supervised experiences in the education of children and youth in grades one through eight who require special education services. The internship sites and activities are assigned according to each student's interest and training needs. The participant implements foundational knowledge, skills, and dispositions gained in coursework in the areas of assessment, instruction, classroom management, and individual behavior intervention appropriate for the learning characteristics of elementary and middle school age students with disabilities.

ED.874.861.  Mild to Moderate Disabilities Internship: Culmination - Elementary/Middle.  3 Credits.  

Designed for students seeking Maryland generic special education certification at the elementary/middle level, this internship, scheduled near the completion of a student's program, provides supervised experiences in the education of children and youth in grades one through eight who require special education services. The internship sites and activities are assigned according to each student's interest and training needs. The participant continues professional development begun during the induction internship by implementing content specific knowledge, skills, and dispositions gained in subsequent coursework, with a focus on evaluating, selecting, and using reading materials and instructional methods appropriate for the learning characteristics of elementary and middle school age students with disabilities. This course incorporates goals and objectives that correspond to the MSDE required course, ED.884.505 Materials for Teaching Reading. (3 credits)

ED.874.870.  Mild to Moderate Disabilities Internship: Induction - Secondary/Adult.  3 Credits.  

Designed for students seeking Maryland generic special education certification at the secondary/adult level, this internship, scheduled approximately midpoint in a student's program, provides supervised experiences in the education of adolescents and young adults in grades six through 12 who require special education services. The internship sites and activities are assigned according to each student's interest and training needs. The participant implements foundational knowledge, skills, and dispositions gained in coursework in the areas of assessment, instruction, classroom management, and individual behavior intervention appropriate for the learning characteristics of middle and high school age students with disabilities.

ED.874.871.  Mild to Moderate Disabilities Internship: Culmination - Secondary/Adult.  3 Credits.  

Designed for students seeking Maryland generic special education certification at the secondary/adult level, this internship, scheduled near the completion of a student's program, provides supervised experiences in the education of adolescents and young adults in grades six through 12 who require special education services. The internship sites and activities are assigned according to each student's interest and training needs. The participant continues professional development begun during the induction internship by implementing content specific knowledge. This course incorporates goals and objectives that correspond to the MSDE required course, ED.884.510 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Area, Part II. ( 3 credits)

ED.877.513.  Education of Students with Severe Disabilities: Augmentative Communication Systems.  3 Credits.  

Students examine the design of augmentative communication systems that include use of graphic symbols for individuals with severe disabilities. Participants design and construct communication aids and develop strategies for integrating augmentative communication into the curriculum.

ED.877.514.  Community and Independent Living Skills.  3 Credits.  

This course reviews the philosophical movements that have fostered the improvements to the instruction of children, youth, and adults with disabilities. Participants: (a) apply the principles of ecological assessment in the development of curriculum sequences for children and youth with severe disabilities; and (b) examine current research-based teaching practices designed to promote the adaptive skills that contribute to the social competence and community acceptance of individuals with severe disabilities. ( 3 credits)

ED.877.550.  Inclusive Practices for Autism Spectrum Disorders.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the legal mandates for inclusive practices in public schools and barriers to successful inclusion for students with autism. Students will identify the process for determining the most appropriate educational environment and learn the critical steps in preparing students and teachers for inclusion. Models of inclusion and instructional modifications for the general education classroom will be reviewed. Students will learn to define the varying applications of inclusive settings, plan goals and objectives that reflect the inclusion goals, and implement strategies that lead toward inclusion. (3 credits)

ED.877.551.  Survey of Autism and Other Pervasive Developmental Disorders.  3 Credits.  

Providing a comprehensive review of current information about autism and other pervasive developmental disorders, this course draws on research findings and clinical experience from a number of related disciplines, including psychiatry, psychology, neurobiology, and pediatrics. In addition to exploring theories of causation, developmental aspects, descriptive and diagnostic characteristics, and legal and social issues, students are introduced to the primary therapeutic and intervention strategies employed with students who have autism. The theoretical basis of, and empirical evidence for, the diverse traditional and nontraditional therapies that have been proposed for persons with autism are also explored.

ED.877.553.  Classroom Programming for Students with Autism.  3 Credits.  

Students examine the design and implementation of effective classroom programs for students with autism who differ in age and level of functioning. The course topics include classroom structure and organization, group instruction strategies, educational assessment and IEP development, data collection, curriculum, instructional activities and materials, parent involvement, and staffing and support services. (3 credits)

ED.877.555.  Teaching Communication and Social Skills.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the assessment and instructional strategies that have been shown to be effective in promoting the development of cognitive, language, and social skills by students who have severe disabilities, including those diagnosed with autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, or other pervasive developmental disorders. Participants examine the instructional adaptations needed to promote the development of cognitive, communicative, and social skills in students with severe disabilities, and review the relevant empirical literature.

ED.877.810.  Internship in Severe Disabilities: Induction.  3 Credits.  

Designed for severe disabilities program participants on the Maryland State certification and Non-certification track, this internship provides supervised field experiences in the application of instructional strategies and curriculum adaptations needed to teach children with severe disabilities. Students completing the induction internship gradually assume leadership responsibilities in their placement setting and are expected to demonstrate fluency of applied instructional and behavioral skills. (3 credits)

ED.877.811.  Internship in Severe Disabilities: Culmination.  3 Credits.  

Designed for severe disabilities program participants on the Maryland State certification track, this internship provides supervised field experiences in the application of instructional strategies and curriculum adaptations needed to teach children with severe disabilities. Students completing the culminating internship assume a more complete leadership role in their placement setting and are expected to demonstrate applied instructional and behavioral skills at and advanced mastery level. (3 credits)

ED.881.610.  Curriculum Theory, Development, and Implementation.  3 Credits.  

Students examine curriculum theory through philosophical, historical, and sociological perspectives and apply course content to contemporary curriculum issues. Topics include aligning instruction with state and school district curricula and modifying curricula to meet individual learner needs. Students also explore effective strategies for implementing curriculum changes.

ED.881.622.  Advanced Instructional Strategies.  3 Credits.  

Students review recent research on effective instruction and explore advanced classroom strategies and techniques designed to enhance their effectiveness in meeting the needs of diverse populations of learners. Examples include direct instruction, cooperative learning, dimensions of learning, creative problem solving, and applications of technology to thinking and learning. Students develop expert teaching skills and learn to diagnose and deliver instructional strategies that are most appropriate in specific circumstances.

ED.882.524.  Education of Culturally Diverse Students.  3 Credits.  

Participants analyze recent research related to the education of culturally diverse children and youth and explore case studies of successful minority education programs. The course focuses on understanding the interrelated roles of the school, the family, and the community in addressing the educational needs of culturally diverse children and youth.

ED.884.501.  Processes and Acquisition of Literacy.  3 Credits.  

This online course is designed to provide a deep understanding of the component processes associated with reading and writing (with mention of speaking and listening) and the ways that students develop into skilled readers and writers. There are five major themes: the component processes of reading and writing; the nature and structure of the English language; the ways that native English speakers and English learners differ in the ways they read and write; the developmental phases associated with learning to read and write for native English speakers and English learners; and the many factors the influence literacy development. Where appropriate, candidates will explore how to assess literacy processes and acquisition.

ED.884.502.  Assessment of Literacy.  3 Credits.  

Students in this course learn approaches for assessing and addressing the reading abilities and needs of children. Course activities include the examination of learner characteristics and implications for appropriate reading instruction. Students study and analyze a broad selection of formal and informal assessment techniques and instruments, their application to reading instruction and classroom practice, and strategies for effectively communicating relevant information to parents, educators, and other professionals about children’s reading performances.

ED.884.507.  Instruction for Literacy.  3 Credits.  

Students in this course study how reading research is applied to the various methods, strategies, and techniques of elementary classroom reading instruction. Emphasis is placed on developing expert knowledge in teaching phonics, word recognition, vocabulary, reading comprehension strategies, organization, and study skills related with reading and academic achievement. Participants explore strategies for differentiating instruction to address the wide range of reading abilities and cultural experiences found in classrooms.

Prerequisite(s): ED.884.501

ED.884.508.  Literacy in the Content Areas Part I.  3 Credits.  

This course is intended to present the reading process from initial to proficient adult levels for teachers of content subjects in middle or high school. Organizing principles of learning development, differences, and environments will be introduced, and connected with principles of content knowledge and application. Additionally, the uses of assessment will be explored and joined to evidence-based practices of planning and multimodal instruction. Finally, issues of professional practice and ethics will be discussed.

ED.884.510.  Literacy in the Content Areas Part 2.  3 Credits.  

This online graduate level course extends the understanding of the adolescent learner as they explore, apply and discuss literacy skills across the disciplines. Application of information acquired in the first part of the course sequence (Literacy in the Content Areas - Part 1) will be referenced and emphasized to demonstrate understanding and the ability to design, implement and assess effective literacy instruction in the content classroom.

Prerequisite(s): ED.884.508

ED.892.562.  Access to General Education Curriculum with Technology Accommodations.  3 Credits.  

(Lab Class) Class members investigate student characteristics, the collaborative role of educators, and strategies for differentiating instruction for students with learning disabilities within the general education environment. Participants examine universal design for learning strategies and technologies to enhance student participation in educational programs.

Interdisciplinary Studies in Education

ED.811.611.  Special Education and Inclusion: Promises and Challenges.  2 Credits.  

This course provides: (1) an overview of the characteristics of students with exceptional learning needs; (2) the field’s history, laws, procedures and trends; and (3) a framework for understanding key concepts in inclusion as they relate to the academic, social, and emotional development of all learners. Participants will begin to consider the cultural and linguistic issues that influence students’ needs and families’ understanding of special education services.

ED.811.612.  Introduction to Assessment and Tiered Instruction.  2 Credits.  

This course examines teaching and learning for students with exceptional learning needs in the general education classroom, with specific attention to the role of informal assessment and subsequent differentiation in response to findings. Foci include: (a) best practices for nondiscriminatory assessment, (b) practice administering group and individual informal assessments, (c) knowing how, when, and why to vary learning environments, learning activities, and content, and (d) implementing Tier 1 accommodations/modifications and Tier 2 interventions to support student learning opportunities.

ED.811.615.  Formal Assessment and Designing Individualized Education Programs.  1 Credit.  

This course provides review of measurement statistics and practice with the administration, scoring, and interpretation of commonly used norm-referenced instruments and procedures for determination of eligibility for special education. Comparisons are made with informal assessment results, and ways to communicate results are discussed. Writing a formal report based on multiple data points is explained and detailed. The IEP process, from referral to eligibility determination and placement, is examined.

ED.811.619.  Clinical Residency II.  3 Credits.  

Fellows are expected to reflect on their many opportunities to develop and refine their instructional practice and classroom management skills in a whole class setting as well as plan and deliver targeted tiered instruction. Fellows are expected to implement the content and skills developed through coursework and the inherent clinical experiences in a comprehensive manner during their first year as a teacher of record. Fellows will examine the evolution in their unit and lesson planning throughout the year and draw conclusions that inform their ongoing ability to plan targeted, rigorous, and engaging lessons.

ED.811.620.  Foundations in Elementary Education: Introduction to Teaching and Learning.  3 Credits.  

In this course, participants will begin to examine the features of high-quality instruction and in what ways are they the same and different across the content areas. Participants will explore the issues central to urban education, including race, culture, and diversity, as well as the importance of building relationships with students and families. Participants will also explore the ways in which colleagues can support each other in improving the teaching practice of all.

ED.811.621.  Language Development in Children.  2 Credits.  

In this course, participants will begin to learn about language development. Participants will examine various aspects of language development, including second language acquisition and dialect, including the milestones that mark English and second language development at various stages, and the factors that influence first and second language acquisition and development. Participants will also explore how language-rich environments and practices contribute to lasting language development.

ED.811.622.  Number, Operations, and Algebraic Thinking I.  2 Credits.  

Participants investigate the conceptual and procedural knowledge involved in learning to count, understanding our number system, and adding and subtracting whole numbers. Particular attention is given to the importance of the representation and communication of mathematical ideas, the attributes of worthwhile tasks, and to gaining a deep understanding of the ways in which algebraic thinking underpins arithmetic.

ED.811.635.  Children's Literature.  

In this course, participants will immerse themselves in the study of a wide variety of children’s literature including traditional and nontraditional texts, informational texts, and media texts. Participants will understand the different variables for choosing texts by class and individual child. Participants will use research and literary criticism, along with their deepening content knowledge, to develop a lens for analyzing texts in terms of possible instructional purposes, student access and interests, and issues of equity (both for biased representations and the cultural and linguistic challenges of texts). Participants will examine the use of assessment strategies to select and design instruction to meet specific learning goals and will monitor progress. Data will be used to plan further lessons, systematically mark growth, and differentiate instruction for student success.

ED.811.641.  Language Acquisition.  2 Credits.  

Participants will look deeply at three major topics that are important to supporting linguistically and culturally diverse students in urban, secondary education settings: language variation, academic language, and second language acquisition. Participants will explore these interrelated topics, attending to both socio-cultural and cognitive-linguistic perspectives on learning and learning environments. The purpose of the course is to guide educators to use linguistic awareness to inform their teaching. Participants will examine state standards andthe role of language in assessment and learning.

ED.811.642.  Reading Diagnosis and Intervention.  2 Credits.  

In this course, participants will deepen their understanding of reading processes, methods of reading assessment, and reading intervention strategies. They will assess students’ skills and knowledge in word recognition, fluency, vocabulary, and reading comprehension, and prepare lessons in response to students’ needs. To ensure effective management and clear communication with colleagues and caregivers during the first semester as lead instructors, participants will prepare thorough plans for classroom procedures related to reading assessment and instruction, and they will develop careful scripts for conferences. Course sessions will include time for collaborative lesson planning.

ED.811.652.  Algebra, Functions, and Modeling in the Real World.  3 Credits.  

This course aims to provide participants with a rich understanding of essential conceptsundergirding high school algebra, functions and the modeling process. Participants considercritical components of how students in grades 6-12 develop algebraic thinking and skill, beyondtraditional focus on algebraic manipulations. An in-depth focus on functions in the course allowsparticipants to systematically explore and analyze patterns, change and relationships amongquantities in everyday events and problems in life and society. Participants will further theiralgebra experience by exploring functions as fundamental mathematics objects that allow us tomodel real life situations. Understanding and applying components of the modeling process allows participations to examine authentic real-world situations by building mathematical models and applying solutions using the lens of culturally relevant pedagogy and social justice mathematics.

ED.811.654.  Geometrical Thinking.  2 Credits.  

In this course participants learn how students in grades 6-12 develop geometric thinking and skill; learn and practice the skills necessary to plan; and enact and reflect on teaching in terms of its effect on student learning. Through field experiences, observation, reflection and reading, participants will continue to identify and analyze teacher moves and mathematical tasks in terms of how well they support the development of students’ geometric thinking.

ED.811.660.  Foundations in Secondary Education: Introduction to Teaching and Learning.  3 Credits.  

In this course, participants will be pushed to see themselves as diversity advocates that understand and respect differences among adolescent learners in their classrooms, schools, and communities. They will explore how to become diversity advocates by first understanding their own beliefs and biases so as to better understand those around them, particularly those that have chosen to serve: urban youth. They will learn that in order to become highly-effective teachers that will build upon the strengths and skills of urban youth and their families and communities, they will need to build healthy, meaningful relationships and promote academic achievement. Participants will also explore the intersection of beliefs and practices through the examination of various learning theories and frameworks for effective, culturally responsive secondary instruction. Through the examination of social, political, economic and racial readings, case studies and discussion, participants will immerse themselves in the work of urban education and self-examination.

ED.811.662.  Reading Processes and Acquisition.  1 Credit.  

This course introduces participants to reading processes and acquisition. Specifically, the fundamental principles of reading and reading acquisition are presented and discussed. Participants will learn how young children learn to read, where reading developmental may break down, and about issues common among adolescents who struggle to make meaning of grade-level texts in the classroom. Participants will be introduced to instructional strategies, materials, and classroom-based assessments to support the adolescent reader.

ED.811.663.  Secondary Content Area Reading/Literacy.  2 Credits.  

This course explores how listening, speaking, reading, writing, and viewing are tools for both accessing and demonstrating content knowledge within an academic discipline at the secondary level. Through the lens of disciplinary literacy, participants will explore the centrality of word knowledge in the academic disciplines, and a range of reading and writing strategies to support comprehension of diverse content area texts.

ED.811.664.  Self-Management of Learning.  2 Credits.  

This course focuses on the concept of self-management and its critical role in promoting student achievement in secondary classrooms. It is meant to give teachers an understanding of how to cultivate and build upon their students’ interests in learning in order to promote self-management skills. The course will discuss learning theory and motivation as it relates to adolescent learning. Participants will have opportunities to practice and implement lessons that support students’ self-management skills, and ultimately student success.

ED.855.502.  Program Evaluation and Learner Assessment in TEFL.  3 Credits.  

Through this course, students will demonstrate mastery of program evaluation development and design as a means for data-driven decision-making for program improvements to language learning programs. Students will also focus on the formative assessment measures for assessing learners’ acquisition of English as a foreign language.

ED.855.520.  Promoting Active Engagement and Learning for TEFL.  1 Credit.  

This course provides an opportunity for students to develop competency in applying current theories of language learning and translanguaging pedagogy within a consistent cycle of instructional delivery. The pairing of an instructional delivery system with theory and pedagogy for language learning enables students to develop coherent and effective English lessons for speakers of other languages. Students use instructional protocols to create effective lesson experiences that promote engagement, advance English competency, and motivate learners with different heritage languages to actively speak, understand, and communicate in English.

ED.855.602.  Extended Learning III.  

Students will participate in a variety of informal educational experiences, from guest lectures and one-on-one mentor conversations, to exploring how the use of museums, cultural institutions, and other real-world scenarios can be leveraged to promote learning. Students will both learn from these experiences as well as gain exemplars to implement in their own educational systems.

ED.880.619.  Foundations of Online Teaching and Learning.  3 Credits.  

This course will provide a research, theoretical, and practical foundation to online teaching and learning. Participants will engage in collaborative inquiry regarding the field of distance learning, resulting in the ability to address common assumptions about online learning, cultural competence in online learning, and ethical issues. Participants will be able to distinguish an effective online learning experience for adults and create criterion for selection, implementation, and integration of an online learning tool or application.

ED.880.830.  Graduate Project in Interdisciplinary Studies.  3 Credits.  

Students of demonstrated ability with special interest in interdisciplinary projects study under the direction of a faculty member in the School of Education. Students must meet with their faculty adviser and prepare an outline of their proposed project prior to registration.

ED.887.611.  Understanding Human Behavior and Helping Relationships, Part I.  3 Credits.  

This course provides an introduction to the various helping professions that are available to support teachers in their work with students, including school counselors and clinical mental health counselors. The differences between these helping professions and services provided through special education will be discussed. The course addresses various approaches to helping students, as well as means for collaborating with helping professionals, consulting with other school leaders, and counseling students. Finally, students will learn how to use data in making decisions about how best to address socio-emotional issues so as to promote academic achievement.

ED.887.612.  Understanding Human Behavior and Helping Relationships, Part II.  3 Credits.  

Building on the information presented in Understanding Human Behavior and Helping Relationships, Part I, this course examines ways of assisting with emotional disorders that teachers may face in the classroom. The main focus of the course is on recognizing the signs of these disorders and working with the school counselor to support children with these diagnoses in the classroom setting. General school issues such as bullying and abuse prevention will also be covered.

Research & Doctoral Programs

ED.855.702.  Causal Inference When Regression Fails.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces strategies for estimating causal effects from a counterfactual perspective when conditioning techniques, such as matching and regression, do not identify the parameter of interest. After a review of scenarios when such conditioning will fail, the course then presents intervention designs, explaining randomization from both a potential outcome and causal graph perspective. The challenges to implementation of these designs are then discussed, with a special focus on large-scale randomized trials in education research. The course then considers the most prominent designs for causal inference in observational research in the presence of troubling unobservables: instrumental variable estimators, pre-post longitudinal designs, regression discontinuity, and estimation via exhaustive mechanisms. The course concludes with a consideration of credible avenues for investigation when point identification cannot be achieved, including an analysis of bounds and the estimation of a provisional estimate followed by a sensitivity analysis.

ED.855.752.  Trends, Principles, and Practices of 21st Century Learning.  3 Credits.  

This course explores pedagogical shifts in education that have arisen as a result of the integration of advanced digital tools and considers how these shifts and tools impact leadership, organization, instructional delivery, and student learning in today’s schools. Participants learn essential principles and practices for building 21st century content and technology-rich learning environments for all students including those with disabilities and other special needs.

ED.855.753.  Digital Age Technology and Instruction.  3 Credits.  

This course provides opportunities for participants to explore integration of technology within the K-16 classroom environment. First, students will examine barriers to technology integration in the K-16 context with implications for professional development. Students will examine theoretical perspectives and research to investigate the advantages and challenges of effectively integrating technology to support learning. Specifically, students will be engaged in critically examining “evaluation practices” related to effective application of digital technology in the classroom from an informed theoretical, empirical, and pedagogical perspectives. Examples from research that examines evaluation practices can be related to classroom connectivity technology, mobile technologies, one-to-one computing, and video use. Participants will also be engaged in considering measurement to examine the effectiveness of the technology integration in instruction and gauge the capacity of their school organization in implementing digital age technology successfully. Participants draw upon relevant instructional theories, conceptual frameworks, and effective best practices as criteria for selection, implementation, and integration of technology.

ED.855.807.  Career Development and Academic Writing.  1 Credit.  

What is the next step? Doctoral students face a variety of career development stages as they work toward their professional goals. This course will cover a wide range of topics related to Ph.D. students' career development, including the university and non-university job market, research and teaching portfolios, CV and resume, job interview skills, networking, and negotiating tips. Furthermore, it is critical for graduate students to have writing skills to effectively convey their ideas to different types of audiences and to achieve their goals as a researcher. This course will also offer an introduction to scientific writing and will provide an overview of important features of academic writing. We will primarily focus on academic writing tasks that may be required in the earlier stages of an academic career. This course will help students to feel prepared for their career and to accomplish their professional goals.

ED.900.895.  Graduate Research.  

Fulltime Equivalency

Special Education

ED.871.514.  Medical and Physical Aspects of Disabilities.  3 Credits.  

This survey course provides students with information from the medical sciences concerning the etiologies and treatments of disabilities. Topics include human genetics and embryology; the newborn period; the structure, functions, and interrelationships of the major systems of the human body; infectious diseases; and emergency procedures. The relationship between students’ medical issues and classroom activities is discussed. (3 credits)

ED.872.500.  Seminar: Current Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Special Education.  3 Credits.  

Beginning students in the Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) program will explore research, policy and practice in the field of ECSE. Students will acquire a broader schema for roles and responsibilities, career planning, accepted standards, contemporary practice, and organizational structures related to ECSE. Students will become familiar with features of national, state, and local ECSE systems. Students will also examine issues related to reform-based preschool and primary special education in Maryland. (3 credits)

ED.872.501.  Screening, Diagnosis, and Assessment of Young Children with Disabilities.  3 Credits.  

The first few years of life establish initial patterns of learning, literacy, and behavior, and set the pace for subsequent development. In this course, the emphasis is on the translation of evaluation and assessment information into meaningful outcomes for young children with disabilities. Students will review instruments and procedures for screening, evaluating, and assessing the status of a young child's cognitive development, physical development (including vision and hearing), communication development, social and emotional development, and adaptive development. (3 credits)

ED.872.502.  Instructional Program Planning and Methods: Birth-3 Years.  3 Credits.  

Early intervention can have a significant effect on developmental outcomes for young children with disabilities and their families. This course will prepare students to support the facilitation of a family-centered foundation for learning and literacy in infants and toddlers. Students will focus on planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for eligible infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and their families. Topics include: (a) a survey of curricular options for young children and families; (b) selection of family-centered treatment outcomes; (c) design of instructional activities for promoting developmental progress; (d) evaluation of program effectiveness; and (e) evaluation of family satisfaction with services.

ED.872.503.  Instructional Program Planning and Methods: Grades Pre-K-3.  3 Credits.  

In this course, students will develop competencies in planning, administering, and reporting the results of a variety of screening, evaluation, and assessment instruments or procedures for children in pre-kindergarten through primary level special education programs. Students will interpret test results for purposes of: (a) communicating findings to families; (b) communicating findings to colleagues; (c) individual program planning for learning and literacy; and (d) monitoring of individualized programs. Students will create strategies for effective management of resources and information related to the screening, evaluation, or assessment process at pre-kindergarten through primary levels of special education. (3 credits)

ED.872.504.  Materials for Teaching Reading to Young Children with Disabilities: Grades K-3.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the variables associated with the selection and use of appropriate materials for teaching reading to kindergarten and primary level students with disabilities. Students will create an organized, comprehensive intervention plan that effectively integrates meaningful and engaging technology and print materials to address the essential components of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension) and written expression. Students will develop a print-rich classroom environment that promotes interests, motivation, and positive attitudes about literacy. (3 credits)

ED.872.509.  Assessment of Reading for Young Children with Disabilities: Grades K-3.  3 Credits.  

In this course, students will select, administer, and interpret a variety of reading assessments to use as the basis to create individualized prevention and intervention strategies. These assessments will include formal and informal measures with a focus on the diagnosis of reading problems, individualized planning for reading instruction, and implementation of such reading programs as Orton-Gillingham, the Stevenson method, phonemic awareness, the alphabetic principle, and modification of the literacy environment. (3 credits)

ED.872.810.  Internship: Early Intervention and Preschool Special Education.  3 Credits.  

Designed for students seeking Maryland special education teacher certification at the infant/primary level, this internship provides supervised field experiences in early intervention or preschool special education programs for young children with disabilities in the birth-to-five-years age range. Internship sites and activities are individually selected according to student interest and training needs. (3 credits)

ED.872.811.  Internship: Preschool and Primary Level Special Education.  3 Credits.  

Designed for students seeking Maryland special education teacher certification at the infant/primary level, this internship provides supervised field experiences in special education for children in the three- to-eight year age range. Field sites and activities are individually selected according to student interest and training needs. (3 credits)

ED.873.612.  Applied Behavior Analysis Practicum III.  3 Credits.  

The practicum is designed to meet field experience requirements as outlined by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB; www.bacb.com). This practicum provides supervised experiences in the application of behavior analytic services in educational settings. The practicum will also include a face-to- face seminar with an instructor.

Prerequisite(s): ED.873.601, ED.873.602, ED.873.603, ED.873.604, ED.873.605, ED.873.607

ED.873.613.  Applied Behavior Analysis IV.  3 Credits.  

The practicum is designed to meet field experience requirements as outlined by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB; www.bacb.com). This practicum provides supervised experiences in the application of behavior analytic services in educational settings. The practicum will also include a face-to- face seminar with an instructor.

Prerequisite(s): ED.873.601, ED.873.602, ED.873.603,ED.873.604, ED.873.605 and ED.873.607

ED.877.515.  Education of Students with Severe Disabilities: Hearing and Vision Impairments.  3 Credits.  

Participants review suitable methods of assessing the visual and auditory capabilities of students with severe and multiple disabilities and the instructional adaptations necessary to increase their function in daily activities. Topics include ocular and auditory pathologies and their educational implications, functional vision evaluation, and behavioral audiometry.

ED.877.518.  Education of Students with Severe Disabilities: Management of Motor Skills.  3 Credits.  

This course examines atypical variations in the motor development of students with severe disabilities, with an emphasis on the remediation of abnormal patterns in the performance of daily activities. Participants gain information about specific remediation strategies and the appropriate use of assistive equipment to promote functional positioning, movement, and oral motor skills.

ED.878.501.  Differentiated Instruction and Inclusion.  3 Credits.  

Students examine practical, ethical, and theoretical issues in the context of national, state, and local initiatives for least restrictive placement of students with diverse learning needs, including typical students, ESOL students, students with disabilities, and those who are gifted. Individuals compare and contrast existing service delivery systems and model programs that are successful at integrating students with a range of educational needs into general education settings. (3 credits)

ED.878.502.  Curriculum Design and Adaptations for Strategic Interventions I.  3 Credits.  

Students analyze and adapt curricula from general education and design lessons to implement goals and objectives from learners' individualized education programs into their general education settings. Topics include frameworks for curriculum design, assistive technology, effective teaching methods for heterogeneous instruction, and instructional planning techniques that address the needs of students. (3 credits)

ED.878.503.  Educational Measurement and Curricular-Based Assessment.  3 Credits.  

Students review standardized achievement tests, criterion-referenced tests, and curriculum-based measurement, and interpret results as they relate to program planning for learners with diverse learning needs in general education classrooms. The course emphasizes developing curricular-based assessments and progress monitoring of students, determining local and school norms for tests, and evaluating learners' progress and performance in academic and social curricular areas. (3 credits)

ED.878.505.  Cooperative Learning for Diverse School Programs.  3 Credits.  

Students explore the recent research on cooperative learning and develop methods for using cooperative systems in heterogeneous settings that accommodate individuals with a range of diverse learning needs. Participants discuss cooperative and peer learning programs and explore research findings and practical classroom organization and instructional strategies. (3 credits)

Teacher Development & Leadership

ED.851.648.  Team Leadership.  3 Credits.  

This course is designed for school leaders, including administrators, supervisors, and teachers, who want to improve their knowledge and ability to facilitate change in the classroom, school, or district. The course is based on the premise that educational leaders devote considerable time working in group situations. The course is based on research and theory in education and other fields related to individual, group, intergroup, and organizational development. Opportunities are provided for participants to explore and practice various strategies with special emphasis on how these relate to change in educational settings.

ED.881.621.  Effective Schools and Effective Instruction.  3 Credits.  

Participants review recent research on effective schools and effective instructional techniques. Additional topics include strategies for implementing relevant research findings and implications for administrators, supervisors, and teachers.

ED.882.511.  Human Growth and Development: A Lifespan Perspective.  3 Credits.  

Students consider an overview of the physical, social, and emotional aspects of human development throughout the lifespan. The course considers developmental theory and reviews current areas of research.

ED.884.505.  Materials for Teaching Literacy.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on evidence-based evaluation and selection of materials for a comprehensive literacy program. Candidates will explore and evaluate characteristics of effective literacy programming and instruction, and apply that knowledge to selecting, evaluating, and organizing print and multimedia materials that reflect engagement and respect for student diversity. Diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, learning differences, leveling systems, intervention and family support, and student interest and motivation will receive specific focus.

ED.884.508.  Literacy in the Content Areas Part I.  3 Credits.  

This course is intended to present the reading process from initial to proficient adult levels for teachers of content subjects in middle or high school. Organizing principles of learning development, differences, and environments will be introduced, and connected with principles of content knowledge and application. Additionally, the uses of assessment will be explored and joined to evidence-based practices of planning and multimodal instruction. Finally, issues of professional practice and ethics will be discussed.

ED.884.510.  Literacy in the Content Areas Part 2.  3 Credits.  

This online graduate level course extends the understanding of the adolescent learner as they explore, apply and discuss literacy skills across the disciplines. Application of information acquired in the first part of the course sequence (Literacy in the Content Areas - Part 1) will be referenced and emphasized to demonstrate understanding and the ability to design, implement and assess effective literacy instruction in the content classroom.

Prerequisite(s): ED.884.508

ED.884.604.  Emergent Literacy: Research into Practice.  3 Credits.  

This course addresses in-depth instructional issues involving emergent literacy processes. Topics include the application of current literacy theory to alphabetics, word identification, and word study strategies for classroom instruction; designing and providing authentic early literacy experiences and literacy-rich environments; and strategies and methods for storytelling and in developing contextual oral reading fluency. (3 credits)

ED.884.610.  Advanced Diagnosis for Reading Instruction.  3 Credits.  

This course advances and refines the knowledge of students about advanced diagnostic processes in determining reading difficulties and designing appropriate and related interventions. Case study and small group collaboration are used to develop students' abilities to integrate data from multiple sources, generate diagnostic profiles, and make instructional recommendations. Students learn to administer standardized and criterion-referenced assessments and about the principles, philosophies, and strategies of effective remedial approaches. (3 credits)

ED.884.615.  Cross-Cultural Studies in Literacy.  3 Credits.  

Students in this class investigate how culture, language, school and out-of-school literacy experiences, and education policy influence student attitude, learning, and content area knowledge. Participants evaluate multicultural literacy research, curriculum, literature, and new literacies, and how social and cultural factors contribute to daily classroom literacy instruction and everyday life. The course emphasizes creating democratic and culturally sensitive learning environments.

ED.884.620.  Seminar in Reading: Roles of the Reading Specialist.  3 Credits.  

Students in the final year present and evaluate their projects and plans for addressing the needs of students at all levels of reading ability in their classrooms, schools, and school districts. In addition, participants examine selected topics and issues in reading instruction.

Prerequisite(s): ED.884.811[C] OR ED.884.810[C]

ED.884.642.  Linguistics for Teachers.  3 Credits.  

This course acquaints teachers and other reading professionals with aspects of linguistic theory that apply in elementary and secondary classrooms. Emphasis is on a thorough, research-based understanding of phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. Students learn ways to use the information to strengthen existing reading and language arts instruction. Issues of cultural diversity, second language learning, and developmental issues of language are covered in this interactive format.

ED.884.701.  Reading Comprehension and Critical Literacy.  3 Credits.  

Building on the instructional strategies and skills of earlier coursework, this advanced graduate course examines classic and contemporary research and theory in reading comprehension and critical literacy and how these dimensions and processes are applied to literacy education. During the course, students learn to explore and appreciate the diversity of literacy research perspectives, and to learn to think and write critically and analytically about research, literacy education policy, and practices that influence and are used in classroom education. These topics are overlapped by advanced instructional methods and strategies for teaching students reading comprehension and critical literacy skills and dispositions. (3 credits)

ED.884.811.  Supervised Clinical Practicum I for Masters in Reading Candidates.  3 Credits.  

This first practicum is a midpoint program experience for Reading candidates. Candidates demonstrate abilities to translate literacy education research into practice. The overarching intent of Practicum I is to develop literacy education leaders while refining candidates’ knowledge and applications of research. Coursework centers on actual work with children and allows candidates to provide evidence of their mastery of reading education skills and strategies. ( 3 credits)

ED.884.820.  Supervised Clinical Practicum in Reading II.  3 Credits.  

This second practicum is a capstone course that builds on all previous program coursework and especially the pre-requisite ED.884.620 Seminar in Reading: Roles of the Reading Specialist course. Work concentrates on developing effective reading specialist and literacy coaching qualities and skills, facilitating change in school communities, and fostering teacher growth and student achievement. A strong emphasis of the course is on job-embedded professional development. Candidates deliver demonstration lessons and lesson planning assistance to teachers and conduct professional development workshops in school settings. The practicum allows candidates to provide evidence of their mastery of particular ILA leadership/reading specialist standards.

Prerequisite(s): ED.884.610 AND ED.884.620 AND ED.884.810

ED.884.850.  Clinical Practicum in Writing and Other Media.  3 Credits.  

Reading and writing printed texts have been, by tradition, interconnected processes. In the Digital Age, other media, such as still and moving images and audio texts, increasingly coexist alongside printed texts. During this practicum experience, candidates examine current issues involving the communication shifts that are occurring in the 21st century. Using digital literacies, writing, and object-centered multimedia ideas and instructional approaches, candidates work with teachers and students in designing, producing, and using new and traditional literacies to best prepare themselves and others for advancing technologies and practices that are changing the ways that people communicate and network.

ED.893.830.  Graduate Project in Technology.  3 Credits.  

Students of demonstrated ability with special interest in technology study under the direction of a faculty member in the School of Education. Students must meet with their faculty adviser and prepare an outline of their proposed project before they register for this course.

Teacher Preparation

ED.813.663.  Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: Part II.  1 Credit.  

This course focuses on research-based approaches to developing content literacy, a critical component for student achievement in the content areas. Students will learn and apply assessment practices, including diagnostic, portfolio, and student self-assessments, which pinpoint students’ content literacy strengths and areas for improvement. Educators also will learn and apply instructional strategies to use before, during and after engaging with content area texts and materials. An emphasis will be on assessing the responsiveness to student’s learning differences (e.g., language, culture, learning styles, multiple intelligences, learning difficulties/disabilities, and giftedness).

ED.813.690.  TNTP Independent Study.  6 Credits.  

In this course, educators will demonstrate competency of objectives related to effective instruction. Through a combination of independent personal development and cultivation of classroom evidence, educators will create a portfolio. Topics covered in the portfolio will include: instructional planning, assessment and data review, classroom management and culture, and special education.