AS.230.101.  Introduction to Sociology.  3 Credits.  

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.109.  Freshman Seminar: Hot Topics in Education.  3 Credits.  

This course examines current school reform initiatives and the controversies surrounding them through a sociological lens. Freshmen Only

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.143.  Global Migration: Refugees, Economic Migrants, and Borders.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces students to the different forms, catalysts, and consequences of global migration. Even as the plight of migrants and refugees has elicited the sympathy of millions worldwide, the majority of them still encounter closed borders and draconian immigration regimes on the fringes of more “desirable” destinations in Europe, Australia, and the United States, and many others remain in limbo in their countries of origin or in transit states. Are these border restrictions new? Or are they consistent with states’ long-standing ways of regulating who is and is not worthy of being admitted through their borders? Throughout the course, we will trace the divergent factors that prompt refugees and economic migrants to migrate, juxtaposing these with the responses of states, international treaties, and humanitarian organizations to their movement and arrival in host countries. Using a variety of written and verbal assignments, we will question the fundamental categories of migration: What is an economic migrant? What is a refugee? How are they different or similar? Whose interests do such categories serve, and how have they been used justify governmental practices of inclusion and exclusion over time?

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.147.  Introduction to Islam Since 1800.  3 Credits.  

This course is an introduction to contemporary Islam and Muslim societies from approximately 1800 to the present. Key themes will include the colonial encounter, state formation and reform, revolution, Islamic revival, and globalization. Reflecting Islam’s status as a world religion, the course will touch on developments around the Muslim-majority world and in the West.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.150.  Issues in International Development.  3 Credits.  

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.154.  Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and Aging.  3 Credits.  

In this course students will develop an understanding of the ways in which gender structures health and well being through adulthood and later life. The experience of sexual minorities and the ntersection of gender with class and ethnicity will also be discussed. Students will be expected to participate actively and lead discussions on specific topics.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.175.  Chinese Revolutions.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations. Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.195.  Exploring Baltimore: An Introduction to Urban Studies.  3 Credits.  

This course will introduce students to the field of urban studies and Baltimore itself. Students will learn data collection and analysis methods used in the social sciences. Students will discuss relevant research published in urban studies by Johns Hopkins faculty and other experts in the field. Students will also gain an introduction to their adopted home, Baltimore, by collecting data and conducting field observations in different neighborhoods.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.202.  Research Methods for the Social Sciences.  3 Credits.  

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.205.  Introduction to Social Statistics.  4 Credits.  

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

Prerequisite(s): Statistics Sequence restriction: students who have completed any of these courses may not register: EN.550.211 OR EN.550.230 OR EN.550.310 OR EN.550.311 OR EN.550.413 OR EN.550.420 OR EN.550.420 OR EN.550.420 OR EN.560.435 OR AS.280.345 OR AS.200.314 OR AS.200.315 OR EN.560.348;Statistics Sequence Restriction: Students who have completed EN.550.111 OR EN.550.113 may not enroll.

Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.213.  Social Theory.  3 Credits.  

This course will focus on four classical theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced the ways we study society: Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and W. E. B. Du Bois. The course is devoted to understanding how each theorist understood the origin, structure, and historical dynamics of modern societies. In addition to comparing their theories, we will use them to analyze current social issues, including those involving social inequality, conflict, cohesion, and change.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.216.  Disability and Society.  3 Credits.  

Objectives of this course are to achieve an understanding of the social context of disability from the population level to the individual disability experience. Topics will include social versus medical models of disability; the spectrum of ability; the history of disability; civil rights perspectives; life course and aging aspects of disability; and the role of the environment. Attention will be paid both to theoretical understandings of disability and the role of policies.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.219.  Land, Labor and Environmental Movements in Contemporary Africa.  3 Credits.  

The course examines the new wave of social protest and popular uprisings in contemporary Africa through the interconnected themes of land, labor, and environmental movements.Attention will be placed on the early 21st century.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.221.  Global Social Change.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces students to issues of global social change, with a particular focus on the challenges of international development and the contemporary globalization process. Specific themes include world income inequality and global poverty, the rise of supranational organizations (e.g. WTO and EU) and their relations with sovereign states, anti-globalization activism, the rise of China and India in the global economy, and the origins as well as consequences of the current global economic crisis, among others. Lectures will be aided by documentary films and other multi-media materials. Special Note: Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.Formerly offered as AS 230.353. Students who took AS.230.353 cannot take AS.230.221.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.222.  Land, Labor, Environmental Rights and Struggles in Contemporary Africa.  3 Credits.  

The course examines the new wave of social protest and popular uprisings in contemporary Africa through the interconnected themes of land, labor and environmental struggles.Attention will be placed on the early 21st century.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.223.  Housing and Homelessness in the United States.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.224.  Freshman Seminar: Public Opinion and Democracy.  3 Credits.  

How does public opinion shape electoral behavior and democratic governance, and how have these relationships evolved as techniques for measuring public opinion have developed since the 1950s? After a consideration of models of effective democratic governance, the course will consider how public opinion is measured and interpreted in the United States by private pollsters, university-based survey researchers, and data journalists. The course will consider competing perspectives on the sources of variation within mass public opinion, such as social class membership, racial and gender identity, religious affiliation, and party identification. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing that opposing analysts adopt. Students will learn to interpret and write about public opinion patterns from these perspectives.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.228.  Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested Legacies.  3 Credits.  

This course surveys the impacts of colonialism in East and Southeast Asia. Special attention will be paid to the social and economic development in British Singapore and Hong Kong as well as Japanese Korea and Taiwan. Topics include free-trade imperialism, colonial modernity, anticolonial movements, pan-Asianism, and post-war U.S. hegemony.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.233.  Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary China.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the trajectory of economic development in China since the beginning of market reforms in the late 1970s, with a special focus on social inequality and forms of resistance that have emerged in response to the expansion of the market economy. The first part of the course focuses on understanding the academic debates around China’s economic miracle and introduces students to theories about the relationship between market expansion and social resistance. The second part focuses on key thematic topics including the rural/urban divide, rural protest, urban inequality and labor unrest, gender and sexuality in social movements, environmental protests, and the politics of ethnic relations.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.238.  Beyond the Wall: The Political Economy of the US and Mexico.  3 Credits.  

Examining the exchange of culture, people, and commodities between the United States and Mexico since the 19th century, this course asks not just how US practices and policies have shaped Mexican society, but how, in turn, Mexico has shaped the United States. We will examine the social, political, and economic forces that have long pulled these two societies together – and pushed them apart.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.244.  Race and Ethnicity in American Society.  3 Credits.  

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.255.  The Sociology of Gender and Sexuality.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine the processes by which gender is socially constructed and how society and its social institutions structure life chances based on gender. It employs Barbara J. Risman’s (2004) conceptualization of “gender as a social structure’: “Gender is deeply embedded as a basis for stratification not just in our personalities, our cultural rules, or institutions but in all these, and in complicated ways.” Course lectures and assignments for this course center on the distinction between biological sex and sociological gender, causes and consequences of gender inequality, and the intersectionality of gender, sexuality, race-ethnicity, class, religions, and other social structures in contemporary society and in everyday life. Students will examine theories of gender through scholarly literature, and popular films are used to help offer insight into gender theory, research, and social and academic commentary. Though the course will primarily cover gender as enacted in the United States, other countries and their gender dynamics will also be addressed.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.265.  Research Tools for Global Sociology and Development.  3 Credits.  

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development. Required for GSCD track students.Course previously titled "Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences"

Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.275.  Revolution, Reform and Social Inequality in China.  3 Credits.  

This course explores various aspects of social inequality in China during the Mao Zedong and the post-Mao reform eras. We will examine inequality within villages, the rural/urban divide, urban inequality, education and health policies, and gender and ethnic inequality. Each of these issue areas will be tackled analytically, but the aim is also to understand what it was/is like to live in China during and after the Mao era. Formerly offered as AS.230.321.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.304.  (Making Space For) Black Thought.  3 Credits.  

How do we think about the power relations at work in the scholarship we read and in the important texts we consider essential to our educational experience? This course will critically investigate the role that concepts of race and racism have played in formulating dominant perceptions of who can be the producers of knowledge and what constitutes authoritative knowledge itself. We will consider how and why thinkers and scholarship produced outside of Europe and North America are too often ignored for their scholarly contributions and the dynamics that lead to this situation. We will also explore how and why new and important perspectives emerge from engaging and centering voices from beyond traditional canonical works. With a particular focus on the forms of knowledge arising from European Enlightenment approaches to concepts of thought reason and objective knowledge, this course will critically engage students with a wide range of thinkers such asGWF Hegel, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Davis, Ralph Trouillot, Sadiya Hartman, Walter Rodney, Derek Walcott, Sylvia Wynter and Frantz Fanon. This course will focus largely on thinkers engaging within the Black Atlantic and black diaspora traditions to question how we might consider voices and thought from beyond Eurocentric positions in our own scholarly practice.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.306.  Plagues, Power, and Social Control.  3 Credits.  

While developments in biomedicine and health care have led to the eradication, cure and management of many human health problems, disease, illness and health have also been the focus for aggressive social controls and population management. The technologies and practices of disease control and health management have been foundational to some of the most aggressive structures of oppression in recent history such as the Jewish Ghetto, the Concentration Camp, the South African Township and techniques of segregation. This course seeks to explore how epidemics and disease control are linked to larger questions of power, state craft and international dynamics. This course asks how have outbreaks of infectious disease shaped social and political action? How do societies respond to outbreaks and why? What do epidemic moments tell us about global structures of power and the dynamics of control? Drawing on historical cases including plague during the European Renaissance and before, the HIV/AIDS Pandemic and the West African Ebola Outbreak of 2013-2016, this course will introduce students to the history and practices of disease control as well as important theoretical perspectives by which to understand the sociological and historical effects of disease and the responses to them. Students will engage sociological concepts such as biopolitics, social construction of disease and illness and biosecurity and produce a final research paper examining the outcomes and responses to an epidemic event to show mastery of the topics covered in the course.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.312.  Education & Society.  3 Credits.  

This course analyzes educational systems as social institutions and organizations. It gives particular attention to the often taken-for-granted ways that we structure learning in schools and their consequences for social inequality. To these ends, the course will examine classical institutional and organizational theory in sociology and evaluate these theories in their application to historical process of educational formation and the contemporary organization of K-12 schooling in the US.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.313.  Space, Place, Poverty & Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods & Public Housing.  3 Credits.  

Is a neighborhood just a grouping of individuals living in the same place, or do neighborhoods have collective meanings and impacts on children and families? We will capitalize on research methodologies used to define and describe neighborhoods and their effects on economic and educational outcomes. These include case studies, census data, surveys, quasi/experimental data. Focus is on how research measures neighborhood effects and incorporates community level processes into models of social causation (e.g., social capital/control, community efficacy, civic engagement). Also examined: patterns in residential mobility, segregation, and preferences within black and white populations; development of housing policy in the U.S.; programs to determine how neighborhoods affect issues of social importance. Statistics and public policy background is helpful but not required.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.316.  African American Family.  3 Credits.  

This course is an examination of sociological theories and studies of African-American families and an overview of the major issues confronting African-American family life. The contemporary conditions of black families are explored, as well as the historical events that have influenced the family patterns we currently observe. Special attention will be given to social policies that have evolved as a result of the prominence of any one perspective at a given point in time.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.317.  Sociology of Immigration.  3 Credits.  

This course surveys sociological theories and research on immigration to the U.S. Theoretical approaches include theories of international migration, economic sociology, immigration, and assimilation. Research topics include the impact of U.S. immigration laws and policies on immigrant inflows and stocks, self-selection of immigrants, the impact of immigration on the native-born population and the U.S. labor market and economy, and the adaptation of the first and second generations.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.318.  State and Society in Modern India.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the complex, at times conflicting, relationship that has emerged between Indian seats of power from above and Indian expressions of society from below. Attention will be placed on the period between 1947 to the present.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.320.  Education & Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy Perspectives.  3 Credits.  

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.322.  Quantitative Research Practicum.  3 Credits.  

This course provides “hands on” research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Quantitative methods will be emphasized, as applied to census data, survey data and/or archival data. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. Juniors and seniors only. Sophomores require instructor's permission. Recommended Course Background: AS.230.205, AS.230.202

Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.323.  Qualitative Research Practicum.  3 Credits.  

This course provides "hands on" research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Qualitative observational and/or interviewing methods will be emphasized. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. This course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for the Sociology major.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.324.  Gender and International Development.  3 Credits.  

This course employs a comparative perspective to examine the gendered impact of international development experiences and policies. Students will discuss the historical evolution of how the concept of gender has been constructed, conceptualized, and integrated into international development theory and practice. The course will also examine how greater international development. In particular, we will examine structural theories of poverty reduction, individual theories of power and processes of stratification at the household and family level. Specific issue areas will include the globalization, class and work political participation and social movements. Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR). Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.325.  Global Social Change and Development Practicum.  3 Credits.  

This course provides "hands on" research experience in the field of global social change and development. The course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for Sociology majors and is required for the GSCD track.

Prerequisite(s): AS.230.265 or permission of instructor.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.332.  Race, Racism & Racial Privilege.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine the concepts of race, racism, racial privilege in contemporary America, and the West in general. Examples from other countries will be integrated as well. Historical contexts such as the colonialism, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement, and the post Civil Rights era will help to provide an understanding of the social, political, economic, and cultural forces processes that have constructed and shaped the concepts of race and the racialized subject over time.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.335.  Medical Humanitarianism.  3 Credits.  

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.337.  Global Crises: Past and Present.  3 Credits.  

This course will compare the current global crisis with previous major crises of historical capitalism through a combination of theoretical and historical readings. Throughout, we will ask: What can a study of past crises tell us about the nature and future trajectory of the current global crisis? Special emphasis will be placed on (1) “the late-nineteenth century great depression”, (2) the Great Depression of the 1930s, and (3) the period of crisis and stagflation in the 1970s. We will be particularly concerned to understand the differential social and geopolitical impact of the crises. Which social classes bore the brunt of the disruptions in economic activity in each crisis? Which geographical areas or geopolitical groupings lost out (or benefited) from the crisis? How have environmental and ecological challenges resurfaced in each crisis including today?

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.341.  Sociology of Health and Illness.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.348.  Society in the Anthropocene.  3 Credits.  

If the progressive domination of nature has been the overriding ideology of modern societies, extreme weather events and now the Covid-19 pandemic have underscored the tenuousness of that domination. The pandemic has quickly put extreme stress on a variety of social institutions, realizing dystopian scenarios previously imagined by science fiction writers and apocalyptic climate change thinkers. While addressing the unfolding Covid-19 crisis, this course will place it within a broader set of concerns around climate change and what some call the Anthropocene—the era in which human activity has become the dominant influence on the Earth’s climate and environment. We will survey a range of social scientific literature—combined with journalistic and popular sources—on the social origins of ‘natural’ disasters; the ways in which social phenomenon—institutions, ideologies, poverty, inequality, racism, nationalism, anomie and politics—affect and are affected by such disasters; and the different ways in which various social factors—states, investors, social movements and sub-cultures—prepare for the coming crises of the 21st century.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.350.  Capitalism, Dependency, and Development in Latin America.  3 Credits.  

This course examines Latin American insertion into the global capitalist economy from the colonial period to the present. Examining various historical, sociological, and political-economic theories, this course will ask not only how Latin American economies and societies have developed their particular characteristics, but also how theorists within and outside the region have understood Latin American development over time.development over time.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.351.  Capitalism, Development and Resistance in South Korea.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the trajectory of capitalist development in South Korea (hereafter, Korea) in the twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries. We will examine debates around the political economy of development in Korea as well as class formation and social and labor protest. This course is designed to help students explore the dynamics of capitalist development and workers’ movements in Korea as a case of late development in the global South. The course also draws on theoretical perspectives and methodological tools from comparative and world-historical sociology to better understand the Korean case.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.352.  Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity.  3 Credits.  

This course combines lecture and class discussion. It examines the history and historiography of Chinese overseas migration. Major issues include overseas Chinese as “merchants without empire,” Chinese exclusion acts in the age of mass migration, the “Chinese question” in postcolonial Southeast Asia, as well as the making and unmaking of Chinese identity in the current wave of globalization.

Prerequisite(s): Students may not have completed AS.230.217 previously.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.357.  Baltimore and Beyond.  3 Credits.  

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

Prerequisite(s): Students that took AS.360.357 may not take AS.230.357

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.358.  The Politics of Mental Health.  3 Credits.  

This course examines how the psy disciplines – psychology, psychiatry, psychotherapy and related fields – create knowledge about the mind, and how these fields have in turn shaped political and social life since early 20th century. We will explore how the psy disciplines have proven useful to projects of state building by reconstructing the human mind as a calculable, quantifiable entity, one that can be measured and governed across diverse educational, military, and healthcare settings. We will then ask how psychiatric categories such as bipolar disorder and PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) were created, and consider their impact on both the legal/medical management of illness and on lay and expert notions of sanity and normality. Finally, we will examine the rising influence of humanitarian mental health interventions, and immerse ourselves in the debates they have engendered concerning the use of psychotherapy to alleviate suffering in war and disaster zones.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.362.  Migration & Development.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on the relationship between international migration and development. The course first introduces theories of international migration, immigrant integration, and international development. Building on this foundation, we then examine how immigrants interact with their homeland and how sending country governments tap their diaspora to improve development outcomes. Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR). Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.363.  Sociology of Dispossession.  3 Credits.  

The “grabbing” of land and natural resources has, in recent years, generated widespread political conflict across the world and put dispossession on the agenda of academics and policy-makers. Nevertheless, compared to other social relations of power, land dispossession has not been central to scholarly or public understandings of capitalism, the state, development, or politics. In this class, we will collectively explore the nascent field that we might call the sociology of dispossession. We will examine existing theories of dispossession, and proceed to challenge, reconstruct or supplant those theories as we consider a wide range of historical examples of dispossession from the English Enclosures and colonial plunder to contemporary urban redevelopment and rural land grabs. This is a reading- and writing-intensive seminar.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.366.  Black Social Thought and Social Movements.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine the reciprocal relationship between Black social thought and social movements. How have social movements informed thinkers who grapple with questions of freedom and liberation in racially and economically stratified societies, and how have their ideas affected movement tactics? This course will look at 20th century movements and investigate connections between theory and practice through concepts like civil disobedience, internal colonialism, Black feminism, Black internationalism, and others.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.367.  Islamic Finance.  3 Credits.  

Today, Islamic finance is a global industry comprising nearly $2 trillion in assets, with hubs from Kuala Lumpur to Dubai to London. But half a century ago, nothing called “Islamic finance” existed. So where did Islamic finance come from? Why is it growing so fast? And what does it mean for finance to be Islamic? We discuss the ban on riba in the Quran and hadith, finance in early and medieval Islamic societies, petrodollars and the birth of Islamic banking in the 1970s, the rise of Islamic capital markets since 2000, contemporary shariah-compliant financial structures, and the constitution of piety through financial practice.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.369.  Sociology in Economic Life.  3 Credits.  

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.370.  Housing and Homelessness in the United States.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

Prerequisite(s): Students may not have previously taken AS.230.223.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.375.  Nations, States, and Boundaries.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the historical origins and development of the modern global political order based on sovereign nation-states, the crisis of this order through the twentieth century, as well as the unraveling of this order at the turn of the twenty-first century. We will focus on how dominant political organizations in the changing world order (such as states, political parties, and transnational governing bodies) have been shaped by different social forces (such as classes and ethnic groups) and vice versa. Topics covered include rise and fall of modern nationalism, formation of regional and global governing structures, “civilizational” turn of global politics, waves of separatism and redrawing of nation’s boundaries after the Cold War, politics of immigration and citizenship, among others.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.377.  Colonialism and Anti-Colonialism.  3 Credits.  

This seminar examines the theories and historiography of colonialism and anti-colonial movements. It focuses on the establishment of the colonial division of labor, comparative colonialism, identity formation, and nationalism as well as anti-colonial movement.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.378.  Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty.  3 Credits.  

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.379.  Undergraduate Research Seminar.  3 Credits.  

Seminar for Sociology students writing senior honor theses and conducting pre-approved independent research projects. Juniors and Seniors Sociology majors only. Permission of instructor.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.385.  Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America.  3 Credits.  

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.388.  Sociology of the Family.  3 Credits.  

Sociological perspectives on contemporary family life, including marriage and divorce, cohabitation, single parenthood, same sex partnerships, children’s wellbeing, balancing work and family responsibilities, domestic violence, and government policy toward families.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.393.  Global Health and Human Rights.  3 Credits.  

Is access to healthcare a fundamental human right? If so, then which global actors are obligated to provide healthcare to whom, and for how long? How do meanings of health and illness vary across time and place? And finally, how are human rights principles translated into frontline practice in order to promote well-being? This course takes a critical interdisciplinary approach to these questions through a series of global case studies ranging from humanitarian aid in post-tsunami Sri Lanka to anti-FGM (female genital mutilation) campaigns in Ghana. How do international NGOs, UN bodies, and governments collaborate (or compete) to distribute healthcare in places beset by dire resource shortages? Do human rights principles carry legal weight across borders, and if so, could access to healthcare services and essential medicines be litigated in order to compel governments to provide it? And finally, what cultural assumptions do human rights discourses carry with them, and what happens if rights-based approaches are poorly received by recipient populations? Moving beyond the basic principle of healthcare as a human right, this course aims to bring this idea’s history and politics into focus by offering an in-depth exploration of its ethics and implementation.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.394.  Social Statistics.  4 Credits.  

The application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research.

Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.395.  Contemporary Social Theory.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine how major social theorists of the 20th century advanced upon the “classical” social theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. As they grappled with the historical events and social concerns of the 20th century—the Russian revolution and its degeneration into Stalinism, the failure of communist movements in the West, the rise and fall of fascism and Nazism, the consolidation of capitalist democracies and welfare states, the emergence of anti-colonial movements in the “Third World,” and the persistence of race, gender and sexuality as forms of domination—social theorists provided novel answers to classical questions of social theory: 1) what is the structure of modern society, how does it change, and how is it reproduced?; 2) what is the relation between social structures and ideas, knowledge, and subjectivity?; and 3) what are the conditions of possibility for human freedom? Theorists to be covered include Antonio Gramsci, Franz Fanon, W.E.B. Dubois, Georg Lukacs, Talcott Parsons, Herbert Marcuse, Jurgen Habermas, Louis Althusser, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Nancy Fraser, Patricia Hill Collins, Judith Butler, and Henri Lefebvre. In addition to understanding and comparing the theories, we will try to use them to understand contemporary societies.

Prerequisite(s): AS.230.213

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.396.  Politics and Society.  3 Credits.  

This seminar surveys key problems of political sociology including the rise of the modern state, the origins and nature of liberal democracy, sources of authority, the relationship between political and economic power, the nation-state and nationalism, states and war, ideology and political contention, collective identity, social movements, and social revolutions. Fulfills Comparative Politics for International Studies.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.397.  The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars.  3 Credits.  

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.398.  In Our Backyard: Housing and Community Change in Baltimore.  3 Credits.  

This course will focus on how and why urban neighborhoods change. Why does vacant housing grow in some communities, while others seem on the brink of gentrification? Who benefits from neighborhood investment in Baltimore? Can urban revitalization benefit all residents? How can we study these challenging issues? These concerns are as relevant as they have ever been, as Baltimore contends with life after the death of Freddie Gray, contentious investment plans with major developers, and stubborn levels of poverty and crime. In this course, we will read scholarship in urban sociology, economics and housing policy data. A significant portion of the course will be dedicated to the analysis of longitudinal data on neighborhood change in the areas around both of Hopkins’ campuses, as well as other communities in the city. The data includes the perspectives of residents, landlords, developers, and community leaders, as well as ground-level observations of street and housing conditions. The course provides students an opportunity to become involved in timely and relevant research in the city, and possibly produce papers that would be suitable for conference submission, senior theses, and writing samples for graduate school. We will also compare efforts in Baltimore to those elsewhere, such as Detroit, Chicago, Brooklyn, Washington, D.C.Previous coursework in statistics and research methods is helpful but not required.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.405.  Neoliberalism.  3 Credits.  

Neoliberalism, a political project that seeks to subject all aspects of social life to free market force, has ascended to orthodoxy in developed and developing countries alike over the last four decades. This course is a reading seminar focused on some of the key classic and cutting-edge original texts that critically examine and debate the origins, socio-political impacts, and crisis of the neoliberal project. It will cover such topics as the genealogy of the neoliberal idea, neoliberal state, informalization of works, neoliberal cities, rise of the one percent, and global governance. Class will be a mix of lecture and seminar-style discussions. Requirements include reading memo, class presentation, and a term paper.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.415.  Social Problems in Contemporary China.  3 Credits.  

In this course we will examine contemporary Chinese society, looking at economic development, rural transformation, urbanization and migration, labor relations, changes in class structure and family organization, health care, environmental problems, governance, and popular protest. The course is designed for both graduate and undergraduate students. Undergraduates must have already completed a course about China at Hopkins. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.420.  Class, Capitalism, Colonialism: Evaluating the work of Walter Rodney.  1 Credit.  

This course will focus on key writings of Guyanese scholar and intellectual, Walter Rodney (1942-1980) with an emphasis on evaluating his legacy and the relevance of his work for the 21st century, globally and locally. The main course readings are Rodney’s three major books—(1) How Europe Underdeveloped Africa; (2) History of the Guyanese Working People; and (3) Groundings with my Brothers. The course will provide students with the background necessary to participate in the January 31, 2020 workshop on the legacy of Walter Rodney organized by the JHU Arrighi Center for Global Studies.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.435.  The China Boom.  3 Credits.  

This course addresses the origins, global impacts, and demise of China’s economic ascendancy as a world economic and political powerhouse at the turn of the twenty-first century. The course will cover the historical origins of the China boom and impacts of the boom on global political economic order. It will also address the social-political imbalances within China that contribute to the global financial crisis and recent slowdown of the Chinese economy. Particular topics include late imperial and Maoist legacies’ relation to contemporary economic growth, stages of China’s capitalist development, China’s outward investment in the developing world, formation and limits of US-China economic symbiosis, and China’s participation in global governance, among others.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.440.  Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime Asia.  3 Credits.  

The goal of the seminar is to examine the prospects and limits of understanding the incorporation of Asia in the capitalist world-system from the prism of oceanic connections. The theoretical thrust of this course is to develop but also to adapt Janet Abu-Lughod emphasis on the connections across port cities and littoral in the Afro-Eurasian continents before the long sixteenth century in her Before European Hegemony. But instead of looking at a port city as its adjacent hinterland polity’s gateway to global trade in the premodern era, the course examines the multifarious coast-hinterland relationships. The readings are organized by a chronological order, which begins with the historical maritime silk road between the third and thirteenth centuries, and will be followed by Asian port cities in the European age of empire and postwar American-led Cold War Structure, as well as the present-day Chinese New Silk Road Diplomacy. Students are expected to select an issue of regional tensions and to analyze its historical root.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.445.  Sociology of Religion.  3 Credits.  

This seminar tackles major issues in the classical and contemporary sociology of religion. We begin with Ibn Khaldun, Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Émile Durkheim, and Mary Douglas, asking basic questions: What are religion and the sacred? Why do they exist? What is the relationship between religion and social structure? And what role does religion play in morality, solidarity, boundaries, exploitation, patriarchy, and macrohistorical transformations such as the rise of capitalism? Keeping this theoretical grounding (and its flaws and biases) in mind, we continue to probe the problem of religion in modernity through more-recent writings. Topics include the secularization debate (Are modernity and religion antithetical?); “religious markets” and rational-choice theories of religion; religious revivalism, evangelicalism, fundamentalism, and proselytizing movements; feminist and queer sociologies of religion; civil religion (Is standing for the national anthem a religious act?); embodiment and prayer; Orientalism and postcolonial interrogations of the secular; religious violence and nationalism; the intersectionality of religion with race, class, and caste; and religion and neoliberalism. Although dominant sociologies of religion have focused on Christianity in Western Europe and North America, this course applies a global lens, training significant focus on non-Western and non-Christian contexts.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.230.500.  Independent Study.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.230.501.  Research Assistantship.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.230.502.  Senior Thesis Program.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.230.506.  Independent Research.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.230.507.  Internship.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.230.508.  Internship.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.230.597.  Independent Research.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.230.598.  Summer Internship.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.230.599.  Independent Study.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.230.600.  Introduction to Social Statistics.  

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research.

Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.602.  Theories of Society.  

This course will focus on three classical theorists whose ideas have fundamentally influenced the ways we study and understand society: Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim. In the section on Marx, we will also read contributions by his close collaborator, Frederick Engels.

AS.230.603.  Contemporary Social Theory.  

This course will examine how important schools of social theory challenged and reconstructed the “classical” theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim as they grappled with the historical developments and social concerns of the 20th and early 21st centuries.

AS.230.604.  Linear Models for the Social Sciences.  

A seminar in multiple regression (least squares and alternative estimation procedures) with a focus on sociological problems and software applications. Extensions to hierarchical linear models will be included. Graduate students should have completed AS.230.600 or the equivalent. Undergraduates only admitted with instructor's permission, and AS.230.205 or equivalent. Recommended Course Background: AS.230.205, AS.230.600 or equivalent.

AS.230.605.  Categorical Data Analysis.  

This course provides the students with a set of statistical tools to understand and interpret social science research dealing with categorical dependent variables and to prepare students to apply these models in their own research. The models covered in the course include logit, probit, Poisson, and log-linear models, as well as multi-level models of categorical dependent variables.

Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.607.  Labor in the World System.  

This is an intensive reading seminar on working class formation from a comparative, historical and global perspective, including theoretical and empirical (case study) readings on changes over time in labor process, labor markets, and labor movements. We will build on a range of local case studies to establish spatial and temporal patterns, and discuss the connections between these global patterns and the dynamics of historical capitalism.

AS.230.608.  Proseminar In Sociology.  

Individual one-hour presentations by faculty members will introduce students to the faculty’s substantive interests and research styles.

AS.230.609.  Dissertation Seminar.  

Advanced seminar for PhD students who are preparing their dissertation proposals or writing their dissertations. Sociology graduate students only.

AS.230.611.  Seminar on Comparative & World-Historical Sociology.  

In this seminar we will read key texts in comparative sociology. The topics covered are cross-national sociology, comparative national development, comparing world-systems, the modern world-system, globalization, and social movements.

AS.230.612.  Seminar on Social Inequality.  

This seminar attempts a broad survey of sociological theorizing and research on social stratification in the United States and the role of social institutions in generating and mitigating inequality.

AS.230.614.  Seminar On The Family.  

A discussion-oriented seminar focused on major recent writings on the family, in both the developed and developing nations.

AS.230.615.  Sem:Panel Data Analysis.  
AS.230.617.  Seminar on Immigration.  

In-depth reading and discussion of theories and research on immigration to the U.S. theoretical issues include international migration, immigration, and assimilation. Research topics include: the impact of U.S. immigration laws on immigrant inflows and stocks, self-selection of immigrants, the impact of immigration on the native-born population, and the adaptation of the first and second generations. The course focuses on immigration since 1965 and its related controversies and debates.

AS.230.618.  Introduction to Computational Social Science.  

Computational social science is an interdisciplinary field combining social science and data science. Today’s digital age presents both opportunities and risks to social scientists with the availability of increasingly big and complex data that depart from traditional data in remarkable ways. This course offers a foundational basis for social science students to embark upon the field. The weekly 2-hour seminar introduces the topics of big data ethics; research designs for the collection and use of digital trace data, automated texts, government administrative data, and large-scale social network data; new forms of surveys and experiments; and mass data collaborations. Research publications are used to illustrate each topic. The weekly 1-hour labs are for group activities on the weekly topic. There are no social science or data science prerequisites.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.623.  An Introduction to Causal Inference.  

This course introduces strategies for estimating causal effects from a counterfactual perspective, uniting the potential outcome model with causal graph methodology. After an examination of the primary features of the counterfactual perspective and criteria for causal effect identification, the course focuses on developing a deep understanding of data analysis techniques that can work in favorable circumstances, such as matching, regression from a potential outcome perspective, and inverse probability of treatment weighting. The course concludes with the vexing challenges posed by unobserved determinants of both the cause and outcome of interest, and it provides a review of specialized designs that can salvage a research project in these situations.

AS.230.635.  PGSC Research Seminar.  

Working seminar focusing on new research in the field of comparative and world-historical sociology. Sociology graduate students or permission of instructor.

AS.230.643.  Sociological Analysis.  

An intensive analysis of a wide range of sociological studies, designed to acquaint the student with how sociologists deal with important theoretical issues, using a variety of methods and sources of data. Particular attention will be paid to the logical coherence of the studies and to the fit between data and interpretation.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.644.  Reading Capital @150.  

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.646.  Race and Ethnicity in American Society.  

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.647.  Agrarian Change.  

This course will explore questions related to historical and contemporary trajectories of agrarian change. It begins with classical theoretical debates on the distinctiveness of peasantries and their prospects under capitalism. It will then turn to major themes of agrarian change in the twentieth century: modes of production, class polarization and differentiation, peasant wars, moral economies, everyday resistance, collectivization and decollectivization, food regimes, and depeasantization. It will conclude with new themes in agrarian change, with a particular emphasis on contemporary forms of land dispossession and repossession. The course will be structured as a reading-intensive research seminar.

AS.230.649.  Qualitative Research Methods: Domestic and International Fieldwork.  

This course discusses the conceptualization of qualitative research involving fieldwork, and the collecting, analyzing, and reporting of sociological field data in both domestic and international settings. Data collection techniques such as intensive interviewing, participant-observation, document analysis, and ethnography are included. The course also covers the logic of qualitative inquiry, choosing research sites and cases, engaging archival sources, judging the validity and reliability of data, and software-based data analysis.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.650.  Macro-Comparative Research.  

The course examines methods of studying long-term, large-scale social change. Both qualitative and quantitative methods are covered.

AS.230.651.  Political Sociology.  

This seminar surveys key problems of political sociology including the rise of the modern state, the origins and nature of liberal democracy, sources of authority, the relationship between political and economic power, the nation-state and nationalism, states and war, ideology and political contention, collective identity, social movements, and social revolutions.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.658.  Our Backyard: Housing and Community Change in Baltimore.  

This course will focus on how and why urban neighborhoods change. Why does vacant housing grow in some communities, while others seem on the brink of gentrification? Who benefits from neighborhood investment in Baltimore? Can urban revitalization benefit all residents? How can we study these challenging issues? These concerns are as relevant as they have ever been, as Baltimore contends with life after the death of Freddie Gray, contentious investment plans with major developers, and stubborn levels of poverty and crime. In this course, we will read scholarship in urban sociology, economics and housing policy data. A significant portion of the course will be dedicated to the analysis of longitudinal data on neighborhood change in the areas around both of Hopkins’ campuses, as well as other communities in the city. The data includes the perspectives of residents, landlords, developers, and community leaders, as well as ground-level observations of street and housing conditions. The course provides students an opportunity to become involved in timely and relevant research in the city, and possibly produce papers that would be suitable for conference submissions or journal articles. We will also compare efforts in Baltimore to those elsewhere, such as Detroit, Chicago, Brooklyn, Washington, D.C.Previous coursework in statistics, policy, research design and research methods is helpful but not required.

AS.230.665.  Research Tools for Global Sociology and Development.  

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development.

AS.230.674.  Political Economy of India.  

This course is designed to critically engage political economy questions in contemporary India. The course will focus on the post-colonial era. A basic understanding of India’s contemporary political economy is required.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.230.675.  Arrighi General Seminar.  
AS.230.685.  TRP PROPOSAL SEMINAR.  

This seminar includes all members of the second year cohort of sociology graduate students. Class meetings will provide feedback and guidance as students develop proposals for their Trial Research Papers. The course will also include a series of professional developments seminars. For Sociology PhD students only.

AS.230.690.  TRP PRESENTATION SEMINAR.  

This seminar includes all members of the third year cohort of sociology graduate students. Class meetings will provide feedback and guidance as students revise the final drafts of their Trial Research Papers. For Sociology PhD students only.

AS.230.800.  Independent Study.  
AS.230.801.  Research Assistantship.  
AS.230.802.  Dissertation Research.  
AS.230.804.  Research Apprenticeship.  
AS.230.810.  Dissertation Fellowship Semester.  
AS.230.811.  Teaching Assistantship.  
AS.230.815.  Trial Research Paper I.  
AS.230.816.  Trial Research Paper II.  
AS.230.817.  Trial Research Paper III.