SA.100.720.  American Foreign Policy Since WWII.  4 Credits.  

Covers the history of American foreign policy since World War II, with special attention to analyses and interpretations of the determining factors of continuing significance, including factors and trends in the international and domestic environment of U.S. policy.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.100.750.  Comparative Politics.  4 Credits.  

This is a survey course in comparative politics that provides an overview of major theoretical approaches and issue areas in the field of comparative politics. It exposes students to a wide range of themes through reading of foundational work each week. The course starts by introducing competing theoretical approaches adopted by scholars of the field, including the state-centric, comparative historical, rational choice, and institutional perspectives. Using these approaches, the course then proceeds to examine issue areas such as political economy of developed and developing countries, democracy and authoritarianism, voting and parties, nationalism and ethnic politics, and the international context of domestic politics. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.100.761.  Theories of International Relations.  4 Credits.  

Surveys a variety of broad theoretical approaches to analyzing the international political and economic situation. Examines approaches to the study of power, ideology, state interests, peace and war, international law, and equilibrium; presents a critique of liberal, conservative and Marxist conceptions of international politics; and introduces grand theory, political and economic interpretations of systems structure and the values that shape perspectives in international politics.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.100.771.  Evol. of the Intl. System.  4 Credits.  

Provides an historical and global geopolitical framework for understanding how the modern global system has evolved. Focuses on three broad motifs: (1) the dialectical character of the European state system, (2) the relationship of Europe to the rest of the world and (3) the progressive rise of non-European powers and the growing challenge these have posed to Europe’s dominant position in the world. Concludes with reflections on the contemporary international system and its principal actors, with an eye to defining its prospects in the 21st century.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>