PY.260.021.  ESL Writing Intensive.  3 Credits.  

A year-long course designed for international students who are new to writing in English. Course objectives: teaching students the elements of formal writing, including spelling, grammar, vocabulary, sentence structure, paragraph structure, and the elements of thesis, evidence, and conclusion.

PY.260.022.  ESL Writing Intensive.  3 Credits.  

A year-long course designed for international students new to writing in English. The course introduces foundational writing practices and teaches formal writing skills. Course objectives: teaching students the elements of formal writing, including spelling, grammar, vocabulary, sentence structure, paragraph structure, and the elements of thesis, evidence, and conclusion.

Prerequisite(s): PY.260.021[C]

PY.260.023.  Critical Writing Intensive.  3 Credits.  

A year-long course to prepare students for college-level writing. This course introduces students to foundational academic writing skills in summary, citation, use of evidence, analysis, and argument. Assignments focus on sentence- and paragraph-level coherence, while reinforcing the conventions of standard American English in academic settings.

PY.260.024.  Critical Writing Intensive.  3 Credits.  

A year-long course to prepare students for college-level writing. This course introduces stu-dents to foundational academic writing skills in summary, citation, use of evidence, anal-ysis, and argument. Assignments focus on sentence- and paragraph-level coherence, while reinforcing the conventions of standard American English in academic settings.

Prerequisite(s): PY.260.023[C]

PY.260.115.  Core 1.  3 Credits.  

Introduction to the practice of analytical thinking and writing in the context of reading foundational historical, philosophical, and/or literary texts. Course objectives: ensuring competence in writing and critical analysis. Students will write four analytical papers (3-4 pages each). Students must earn a C+ or better to pass the course.

PY.260.216.  Core 2.  3 Credits.  

Introduction to the basics of writing a research paper. Course objectives: ensuring competence in academic research and writing. Students will select a research topic, find source materials, and complete a formal academic research paper (10-15 pages), with appropriate references properly documented. Students must earn a C+ or better to pass the course. Prerequisite: Core I or approved placement.

Prerequisite(s): PY.260.115[C]

PY.260.241.  Art History I.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to the history of art. Open to undergraduates only.

PY.260.250.  U.S. History - WW I/Prohibition.  3 Credits.  

Various approaches to U.S. history. Open to undergraduates only.

PY.260.252.  Art History II.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to the history of art. Open to undergraduates only. This course offers a survey of avant-garde European and American art from the mid-19th century to the present. Some of the many artistic movements covered include Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, German Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, De Stijl, early American Modernism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, and Postmodernism. Additional commentary as it relates to music history will be interwoven.

PY.260.253.  Poetry In German.  3 Credits.  
PY.260.261.  Introduction to Psychology: Human Development & Learning.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to the fields and research methods of contemporary psychology, including such topics as biological and social bases of behavior, human development, perception, memory, learning theory, intelligence, and abnormal behavior. Special emphasis will be placed on subjects of importance to music education. Open to undergraduates only.

PY.260.263.  Psychology of Stress and Health.  3 Credits.  
PY.260.313.  Katharine the Great: An Everlasting Film Star.  3 Credits.  

How does an artist endure? What makes one star last while another fizzles? Katharine Hepburn, 1907-2003, is ranked by the American Film Institute (AFI) as the “greatest female star in the history of American cinema.” She lived as originally as so many of the film heroines she portrayed. This humanities seminar examines the roles and movies that defined the pioneering Hepburn as an actress, a businesswoman, and progressive thinker in American history. Along the way, we will trace pivotal events and cinematic trends in the 20th century contributing to Hepburn’s legacy.

PY.260.315.  Devil Made Me Do It: Faust & Mephisto.  3 Credits.  

We will begin this class by working through Goethe’s Faust. Part 1 and 2. The influence of Faust on other thinkers and artists is simply overwhelming. For this class, I have selected to look into Gounod’s “Faust”, Berlioz’ “Damnation of Faust,” Thomas Mann’s “Doctor Faustus,” and Richard Wagner’s reflections on Faust. The second half of the class will be dedicated to Mikhail Bulgakov’s novel The Master and Margarita, another major work inspired by Goethe’s Faust. While Goethe’s work is a tragedy, Bulgakov’s novel is a satirical dark comedy. To put it in most general terms, what has inspired all these artists and intellectuals to take up Goethe’s Faust seems to be a deep human interest to reflect on our striving for happiness against the horizon of human finitude and imperfection, and the appeal of the devil who promises to grant us our deepest wishes. Through the lens of Goethe, Gounod, Berlioz, Mann, and Bulgakov we will follow this idea in its various tragic and comic manifestations. At the end of the course, we will not only have read one of the most important masterpieces in the history of Western thought, but we will also have gathered a richer understanding of what we mean by terms such as: soul, devil, heaven, hell, human agency and culture. The readings in this class are challenging for their intellectual depth, but at the same time incredible fun and entertaining.

PY.260.320.  Shakespeare.  3 Credits.  

Close reading and exploration of six works by Shakespeare. Open to undergraduates only.

PY.260.330.  Asian Representation in Film and TV.  3 Credits.  

Depictions of East Asian and Asian-American characters in film and television have evolved since the earliest days of Hollywood. Alongside world events and US immigration patterns, representation shifted and a host of stereotypes emerged. Consider the wise guru, the exotic girlfriend, and the martial arts sidekick among many portrayals. This liberal arts seminar offers historical context and critical tools for analyzing and discussing these representations while gaining acquaintance with a range of films and television series.

PY.260.359.  Core 3.  3 Credits.  

Introduction to methods and practices in the humanities, social sciences, or natural sciences. Course objectives: ensuring competence in understanding critical methodol-ogies and academic debate. Students will write two critical assessments involving evidence, evaluation, synthesis, and conclusion (4-6 pages each) and pass a final exam or final project. Students must earn a C+ or better to pass the course. Prerequi-site: Core 2 or approved placement.

Prerequisite(s): PY.260.216[C]

PY.260.360.  Core 4.  3 Credits.  

Sustained consideration of the role of art (music, literature, fine arts, film) in all aspects of society, focusing on particular periods in history or under particular regimes and political structures. Course objectives: ensuring that students have the opportunity to think historically about the role of art and culture in political society and about the economic and cultural systems supporting the creation of art (e.g. patronage, guilds). Students will be required to write one historical “review” of a work of art in historical context (2-3 pages) and one historical research paper (6-8 pages minimum). Students must earn a C+ or better to pass the course. Prerequisite: Core III or approved placement.

Prerequisite(s): PY.260.359[C]