AS.190.101.  Introduction to American Politics.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.102.  Introduction To Comparative Politics.  3 Credits.  

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.108.  Contemporary International Politics.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.109.  Politics of East Asia.  3 Credits.  

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.110.  American Politics in Film.  3 Credits.  

This class uses film to explore a central question in American politics: what is the relationship between the public and those who endeavor to represent them? Over the course of several weeks, we will address this question by viewing Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, A Face in the Crowd, The Candidate, Wag the Dog, and The Ides of March. We will use these films to discuss how political institutions, the media, and money shape our politics. We will also consider how the representation of politics in film has changed over time.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.111.  Introduction to Global Studies.  3 Credits.  

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.137.  Freshman Seminar: Choosing a President.  3 Credits.  

This fall, as they have done every four years for more than 230 years, Americans will elect a president. Presidential elections are one of the more peculiar rituals in American politics, but they are enormously consequential. In this course we will track the 2020 presidential campaign in real time while exploring the history and politics of presidential elections and considering how presidential elections affect other aspects of American politics. The course will involve a combination of reading and writing with hands-on research and exploration projects.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.180.  Introduction to Political Theory.  3 Credits.  

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.204.  Ancient Political Thought.  3 Credits.  

The premise of this course is that a political perspective is tied up with a (meta)physical one, that is to say, with ideas about the nature of Nature and of the status of the human and nonhuman elements within it. How is the universe ordered? Who or what is responsible for it? What place do or should humans occupy within it? How ought we to relate to nonhuman beings and forces? We will read three different responses to such questions and show how they are linked to a particular vision of political life. In the first, the world into which human are born is ordered by gods whose actions often appear inexplicable: Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, Oedipus the King by Sophocles, and Hippolytus by Euripedes will represent this tragic vision of the cosmos. In the second, Plato , in Republic and in Phaedrus, the forces of reason and eros play central and powerful roles. In the third, Augustine of Hippo presents a world designed by a benevolent, omnipotent God who nevertheless has allowed humans a share in their own fate. We end the course with Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy , which offers a perspective on these three visions of the world -- the tragic, the rational, and the faithful -- which will help us evaluate them in the light of contemporary political and ecological concerns.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.205.  Capital: The Best Seller.  3 Credits.  

When Thomas Piketty published _Capital in the Twenty-First Century_ last spring, he made the rounds on talk shows just like a movie star with a new film out, or a rock star with an album about to drop. How is such an “event” possible, and what does it tell us about the book’s subject, capital? This class explores the questions Piketty’s book raises: What is capital? How does it come about, how does it function, and what are its effects?

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.207.  The Power of Rhetoric.  3 Credits.  

In a time when people claim language "has no preference to facts, truths, or realities," the power of rhetoric is both vilified and lauded in the strongest possible terms. According to some, rhetoric is responsible for the dismissal of everything from political dissent to science as a species of "fake news". By contrast, others argue public life cannot be repaired without a "restoration" of rhetoric. What are these people talking about? This course will help us figure this out. Students will be introduced to the art of persuasive speech, writing, and visual media so as to be prepared to critically examine and evaluate the claims made for and about the role of language in contemporary politics. Topics will include informal logic, appeals, fallacies, figures and tropes. Among others, we will read texts by Aristotle, Austin, Barthes, Foucault, Freud, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Zizek. In addition to a number of short exercises and writing assignments throughout the semester, there will be a mid-term and a final paper.

AS.190.217.  Introduction to International Relations Theory.  3 Credits.  

This course is a broad introduction to international relations theory in a format that encompasses lecture and discussion. We will explore mainstream theoretical perspectives and critiques of those perspectives, as well as more recent developments in the field.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.220.  Global Security Politics.  3 Credits.  

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.226.  Global Governance.  3 Credits.  

Global problems like poverty, financial instability, human rights abuses, and climate change threaten both international order and human well-being. In the absence of a world state, these problems must be addressed by an increasingly complex, transnational network of organizations and social groups. First, we will aim to understand and explain how global problems are governed through detailed case studies of International Organizations and Non-Governmental Organizations such as the United Nations, World Bank, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Amnesty International and more. Second, we will critically evaluate the successes and failures of these organizations and explore the possibilities for improving democratic governance at the global level.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.227.  U.S. Foreign Policy.  3 Credits.  

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.245.  The Politics of Global Development.  3 Credits.  

Development is often assumed to be an economic issue. In this course we examine the politics of development on a global scale. We begin by looking at the colonial and Cold War histories of development. We then use these histories to contextualise contemporary development issues that directly affect international relations such as aid and debt, humanitarianism, food security, land “grabs”, migration and indigenous rights. The course also seeks to understand the ways in which the issues underlying global development have always connected and continue to connect the peoples and polities of the Global North and Global South.

AS.190.250.  Statistics for Public Policy.  3 Credits.  

This course is a short, intensive supplement to Thinking Visually About Data, designed to give students a deeper understanding of the basic statistical concepts needed to inform public policy decision-making.

Prerequisite(s): Cannot enroll in AS.190.250 if you have already taken EN.553.111 OR AS.230.205

Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences

AS.190.281.  Virtue, Labor, and Power (Classics of Political Thought II).  3 Credits.  

This is not a class in the history of political thought. Instead, it is an opportunity for a selective, circumscribed, but very focused engagement with some of the most powerful and provocative texts in that history. We will read selections from six thinkers (Socrates, Machiavelli, Locke, Marx, Nietzsche, and Foucault), focusing on three themes (Virtue, Labor, and Power). These texts have all profoundly shaped the way we think about politics, and they are texts that resonate with our own political problematics today.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.282.  Authority and Liberty.  3 Credits.  

Beginning with Plato, and using Nietzsche’s history of metaphysics as a guide, this course serves as an introduction to Euro-American political thought by analyzing the philosophical foundations of political authority. In addition to works by Plato and Nietzsche, readings will include works by Kant, Mill, Hart, and Foucault.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.284.  Classics of Political Theory: Political Freedom.  3 Credits.  

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, and the relationship between freedom, responsibility and political judgment. Spanning texts ancient, modern and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past possible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom’s opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.300.  Racial Inequality, Policy and Politics in the US.  3 Credits.  

While policies were passed to ensure equal opportunity for racially subjugated Americans, the United States witnessed increasing stratification of wealth and income and deepening concentration of poverty, stagnation in closing racial gaps, and new forms of inequality posed by the striking upsurge in contact with the criminal justice system at the bottom of the skills ladder and concentration of wealth at the top. At the same time, the welfare state came under attack and faced challenges posed by an aging population, women entering the labor force, deindustrialization, and international pressures of globalization. Social spending withered in some areas while spending on citizens was increasingly likely to happen through tax expenditures and private means. This course investigates the politics around these developments and competing perspectives in debates over redistributive policies in the United States and their impact on inequality, particularly race and gender inequality. We will examine the contours of inequality and explanations for why it has expanded over the past several decades. We explore why the US is exceptional in both the level of inequality it tolerates and the generosity and types of remedies to alleviate poverty in comparison to its European counterparts and debate the role of race, unions, electoral politics and institutions. We investigate several specific cases of persistent racial inequality – concentrated poverty, segregation, and incarceration. We investigate both how policies have reinforced racial and gender divisions from a top-down perspective as well as examining under what conditions the disadvantaged contest inequality, exploring how political struggle shapes policy from the bottom-up. The last part of the course examines the consequences of inequality and social policy for representation and citizenship and how economic inequality affects political representation and responsiveness of elites to masses.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.302.  How to be a Capitalist.  3 Credits.  

Everyone usually assumes that they know what capitalism is and how it works. Yet some of us often make very poor choices given the framework of a capitalist system, and many of us continually express shock and outrage over outcomes and results that are perfectly reasonable (and to be expected) given the operation of capitalism. This advanced seminar will engage with readings in political theory and political economy that explore the fundamental logic of capitalism.Previous course in Political Theory or Instructor's Permission.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.306.  Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical Prespective.  3 Credits.  

The seminar will introduce students to the political and economic trajectories of Latin America as a whole and of individual countries, including Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Special attention will be paid to the long-term trajectory of the political regime (democracy versus dictatorship) and of economic development (variations in GDP per capita). Competing theories, from economic dependence to historical institutionalism, will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of Latin America’s relative economic backwardness and low quality democracies.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.307.  Race, Politics and Literature.  3 Credits.  

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.308.  Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and Cases.  3 Credits.  

The course will cover three topics: 1) The conceptualization of political regime, democracy and authoritarianism. We will also consider neighboring concepts of other macro-political structures—government, state, and administration—in order to be able to demarcate what is distinctive about the study of political regimes.2) The characterization of political regimes in most Western and some non-Western countries, in history and today. We will centrally focus on the so called “Waves of Democratization,” but we will also consider stories with less happy outcomes, that is, processes that led to the breakdown of democracies and the installation of repressive dictatorships.3) The explanation(s) of the stability and change of political regimes around the world. Theoretical accounts of regime change come in many flavors—emphasis on economic versus political causes, focus on agents and choices versus structures and constraints, international versus domestic factors, among others. We will consider most of them.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.311.  Disposable People: Race, Immigration and Biopolitics.  3 Credits.  

This course will explore theories and practices of race and immigration in order to illuminate the proliferation of populations regarded as disposable in contemporary politics. We will pay special attention to the contestable criteria used to determine eligibility for membership in the human race. We shall also examine how political power influences the relays between citizenship status and those whose lives are worthy of protection, and those who should be allowed to die.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.314.  Struggles for Democracy: from the French Revolution to the Arab Spring.  3 Credits.  

This course is a systematic introduction to theories of regime change, which includes episodes of democratic transitions (gradual or revolutionary) and breakdowns, as well as trajectories of regime stability, like the persistence of various types of authoritarian rule and democratic polities. Two thirds of the course will cover theories, which in comparative politics are mostly inductive constructions from historical experiences. The remaining third will be case studies of exemplary events and processes, for instance, the differentiation of political regimes in post- WWI Europe in terms of liberal, fascist, and social-democratic regimes; the convergence towards democracy in Western Europe and Latin America between 1950 and 1990, and the fragility of democracy in Tropical Africa and the Middle East.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.315.  Asian American Politics.  3 Credits.  

This course examines issues of political identity, political incorporation, and political participation of Asian Americans. Themes include Asian American panethnicity, the struggle for immigration and citizenship, Asian American electoral politics, political activism and resistance since the 1960s, and the impact of Asian Americans on the politics of race and ethnicity in the United States.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.317.  Race and Segregated Time.  3 Credits.  

This course explores how time, and not just space, is segregated along racial lines. We shall examine how racial injustices are experienced as impositions on human time, how resistance to racial inequality has often been figured in temporal terms, and what it means to think in untimely ways that challenge how the extended lifespans of racially dominant groups is contingent upon the foreshortened lifetimes of racial others. Readings will bring political theory into contact with contemporary experiences of race, such as: criminal (in)justice, environmental racism and the proliferation of human disposability. Recommended Course Background: One Political Theory course.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.318.  Political Monsters.  3 Credits.  

This undergraduate seminar in political theory will explore the politics of fear through the trope of political monsters. We will engage with the genre of horror as a political genre, and ask why our current time period seems to be marked by particular sorts of monsters – zombies, vampires, and others. The course will engage with a variety of texts (political tracts, literary and other fictional projects, theoretical works) along with film and television and other media. The trope of political monsters will be the vehicle through which we explore the politics of democracy, of race, of colonialism, and of capitalism.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.319.  Policy & Politics Design.  3 Credits.  

The study of public policy is the study of power—who has it, how it is acquired, and how policies themselves grant or diminish the power of individuals and groups. It is also the study of choice—how political actors make consequential decisions to deploy their resources in different ways, some of which enhance magnify their power while others diminish it. This class will examine the scholarly literature on how public policy is made and how it can be changed. We will also engage directly with actors seeking to change public policy, in order to integrate our academic knowledge with their practical experience.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.320.  Politics Of East Asia.  3 Credits.  

Examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. Topics include state-society relations, late development, nationalism, democratization, political culture, social movements, and globalization.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.322.  Future of American Democracy.  3 Credits.  

For the most part, observers of American politics have not considered the possibility that the American democratic regime might be at risk. But the unexpected election of Donald Trump in 2016 and the subsequent course of his presidency have occasioned a great deal of uncertainty and anxiety about whether democracy in the United States is at risk and whether American political institutions can withstand the stresses of contemporary politics. This course will use the Trump era to explore the conditions that seem to threaten the stability of the American regime. We will begin by exploring the political circumstances that led to Trump’s rise. We will then examine what we can learn from the experience of other countries about the conditions that make democracy either robust or fragile. Finally, we will consider how a set of contemporary political conditions in the United States — extreme partisan polarization, intense racial antagonism, growing economic inequality, and expanded executive power — contribute to the challenges facing American democracy today and in the future.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.325.  Finding Equality in Law and Society.  3 Credits.  

In this class, we will ask questions about the relationship between equality, law, and society. We will investigate how people have used law in their movements for greater equality, and ask whether law has served these movements well and how it has worked. We will pay particular attention to movements based on race, gender, and economic class.

AS.190.326.  Democracy And Elections.  3 Credits.  

An examination of most aspects of democratic elections with the exception of th e behavior of voters. Topics include the impact of various electoral systems and administrative reforms on the outcome of elections, standards for evaluations of electoral systems, and the impact of the Arrow problem on normative theories of democratic elections.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.327.  Politics of Information.  3 Credits.  

Considers global and comparative politics of information, information technologies, and the Internet. Examines governance of information (ownership of information, rights to information, privacy) and governance of information technologies (domain names, social media websites, etc.).

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.329.  National Security-Nuclear Age.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the impact of weapons of mass destruction on international politics with an emphasis on security issues. The first half of the course focuses on the history of nuclear weapons development during the Cold War and theories of deterrence. The second half of the class considers contemporary issues including terrorism, chemical and biological weapons, ballistic missile defense and proliferation. Requirements include a midterm, final and a ten page paper.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.330.  Japanese Politics.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces students to the major debates and issues of postwar Japanese politics. Topics include nationalism, electoral politics, civil society, and immigration.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.331.  America and the World.  3 Credits.  

This course is a survey of the unique position of the United States in world politics. We will cover the broader international relations literature on the dynamics of hegemony, empire, and asymmetrical relationships, from work in the realist tradition to more critical approaches. We will also assess the importance of American domestic institutions in understanding past and contemporary developments.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.333.  American Constitutional Law.  3 Credits.  

This course covers enduring debates about the way the Constitution has structured the U.S. government and about which powers the Constitution assigns to the federal government and to the states. We will examine these debates in the context of American political history and thought by studying the writings of prominent participants, and landmark Supreme Court cases.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.334.  Constitutional Law.  3 Credits.  

Topics include executive and emergency power, racial and gender equality, and selected free speech and religious freedom issues.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.335.  Imagining Borders.  3 Credits.  

What is a border and why do borders matter in global politics. What do borders mean under conditions of globalization? An examination of the politics of borders, transborder flows, and networks within and across borders. The readings which come from political science and other disciplines, will include theoretical and case-specific works.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.338.  Comparative Political Behavior.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to the study of political behavior, emphasizing electoral behavior in democratic countries.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.339.  American Racial Politics.  3 Credits.  

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.214

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.341.  Korean Politics.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces students to the historical and institutional foundations of modern South Korean politics. Topics include nationalism, political economic development, civil society, globalization, and ROK-DPRK relations.(CP)

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.343.  Research Seminar on Political Parties.  3 Credits.  

This seminar has two basic objectives: both theoretical and empirical study of selected topics in the comparative literature on political parties, and the ultimate production of a publishable-quality (or conference-presentable-quality) paper. Topics will include (but not be limited to) the place of parties in political theory and the nature of party systems, party organization, and party behavior in the United States and other countries.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.344.  Seminar In Anti-Semitism.  3 Credits.  

Jews exercise a good deal of power in contemporary America.. They are prominent in a number of key industries, play important roles in the political process, and hold many major national offices. For example, though Jews constitute barely two percent of America’s citizens, about one-third of the nation’s wealthiest 400 individuals are Jewish and more than ten percent of the seats in the U.S. Congress are held by Jews. One recent book declared that, “From the Vatican to the Kremlin, from the White House to Capitol Hill, the world’s movers and shakers view American Jewry as a force to be reckoned with.” Of course, Jews have risen to power in many times and places ranging from the medieval Muslim world and early modern Spain through Germany and the Soviet Union in the 20th century. In nearly every prior instance, though, Jewish power proved to be evanescent. No sooner had the Jews become “a force to be reckoned with” than they found themselves banished to the political ma rgins, forced into exile or worse. Though it may rise to a great height, the power of the Jews seems ultimately to rest on a rather insecure foundation. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.346.  Foundations of International Relations Theory.  3 Credits.  

This course is a broad conceptual introduction to international relations theory in a format that stresses close reading and critical discussion. We will explore mainstream theoretical perspectives and critiques of those perspectives, as well as more recent developments in the field. By the end of the course, students will have a firm grasp of the core issues and debates in the field. The course is conceptually demanding; interested students should have at least completed an introductory course in political science.

AS.190.348.  Business, Finance, and Government in E. Asia.  3 Credits.  

Business, Finance, and Government in East Asia explores the dynamics of East Asia's economic growth (and crises) over the last fifty years. We will examine Japan's post-war development strategy, the Asian tiger economies, and China's dramatic rise. Centered on case studies of major corporations, this course examines the interplay between politics and economics in East Asia, and considers the following questions: How have businesses navigated East Asia’s complex market environment? In what ways can the state foster economic development? How has the financial system been organized to facilitate investment? What are the long-term prospects for growth in the region?

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.356.  The Social Contract and its Discontents.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on one of the most powerful stories told in the tradition of western political theory: the story of the social contract. This story is about the constitution of legitimate political authority. It is told in many ways and each version makes different assumptions, in particular about human nature, the power of reason, the value of order, and the character of justice. We examine this often-conflicting assumptions and explore how they continue to inform the way we think about the possibilities and problems of politics. Readings include texts by Arendt, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Freud, Pateman, the Federalists, Derrida, and Douglass. Final grades are based on class participation, two exams and two papers.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.366.  Free Speech and the Law in Comparative Perspective.  3 Credits.  

This class explores the ideas and legal doctrines that define the freedom of speech. We will examine the free speech jurisprudence of the U.S. in comparison to that of other systems, particularly the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and the Supreme Court of Canada.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.373.  The Politics of Public Policy.  3 Credits.  

This course is an introduction to the political structure and process of making public policy in the United States. Public policymaking is, above all, an arena in which policy professionals try to bring systematic evidence and scientific knowledge to bear to diagnose, understand, and solve social problems. At the same time, policymaking also takes place in a political environment, in which strategic and purposive actors contend for power and seek to advance their own goals and realize their own visions about how the world ought to be changed for the better.The goals that participants in the policymaking process pursue may take a variety of forms: substantive policy outcomes, of course, but also power, political advancement, or material advantage. The actors who populate the process, moreover, may disagree about the goals they seek and making policy — especially in democratic political systems — requires some means of resolving these disagreements. Actors also differ in the resources they have at their disposal to seek their goals — power, money, organization, for example, but also knowledge and expertise. Finally, policymakers cannot do anything they want in pursuit of their goals. They are constrained by the rules and structures that make up the policymaking system. These factors — actors, goals, resources, knowledge, and rules — shape the politics of policymaking and frame the strategic options available to policymakers.

AS.190.379.  Nationalism and the Politics of Identity.  3 Credits.  

Nationalism ties powerful organizations to political mobilization, territory, and individual loyalty. Yet nationalism is typically studied in isolation from other social formations that depend upon organizational – individual linkages. Alternative types of identity category sometimes depend similarly upon organizations that collect and deploy resources, mobilize individuals, erect boundaries, and promote strong emotional connections among individuals as well as between individuals and institutions. In this class, we study classic and contemporary works on nationalism, drawn from multiple disciplinary and analytic traditions, in the comparative context of alternative forms of identity. The focus of the class will be primarily theoretical, with no regional or temporal limitations.

AS.190.380.  The American Welfare State.  3 Credits.  

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Trump. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

Prerequisite(s): Students may take AS.190.380 or AS.360.380, but not both.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.381.  Global Environmental Politics.  3 Credits.  

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.382.  Democracy and Development: Theory and Cases.  3 Credits.  

Most wealthy countries are democracies. But not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples of poor countries with democratic regimes. The course will examine the relation between economic development and political democratization under three big questions. (a) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does economic development promote democracy? (b) If economic development is not possible in the foreseeable future, how do countries achieve stable democratization? (c) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does democracy foster economic development?

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.384.  Urban Politics & Policy.  3 Credits.  

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross-listed with Africana Studies

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.385.  Urban Politics and Policy.  3 Credits.  

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross listed with Africana Studies.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.387.  Parties and Elections in America.  3 Credits.  

Considers how parties and elections structure political conflict, and facilitate (or not) democratic control of government. Topics include campaigns, voting behavior, election administration, money in politics, presidential nomination, and party coalitions.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.394.  Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the domestic, regional, and transnational politics of the Middle East and North Africa. The class is organized into three units. The first examines major armed conflicts—anti-colonial, intra-state, and inter-state—from 1948 through the 1990s. It uses these historical moments as windows onto key issues in Middle Eastern and North African political issues such as external intervention/occupation, human rights, sectarianism, social movements, and memory politics. Unit Two focuses on policy relevant issues such as democratization, minority populations, religion and politics, and gender. In Unit Three, students will explore the politics of the Arab Uprisings through critical reading and discussion of new (post-2011) scholarship on MENA states, organizations, and populations. Enrollment limited to Political Science and International Studies majors.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.396.  Capitalism and Ecology.  3 Credits.  

Capitalism and Ecology focuses on the relations between capitalism and climate during the era of the Anthropocene. How do capitalist processes of fossil extraction, consumption, production and governance contribute to the pace of climate warming, glacier flows, the ocean conveyor system, species loss and other phenomena? What are the effects and the possible modes of political response? How do the nonhuman, self-organizing processes such as glaciers, oceans and climate change on their own as they also amplify the effects of capitalist emissions? The course combines texts on capitalism and activism with those by geoscientists on how the nonhuman systems work. Books by authors in the fields of political theory, geology, anthropology, economics, philosophy and ethology will be drawn upon. Authors such as Michael Benton, Brian Fagan, Hayek, Naomi Klein, Fred Hirsch, Fred Pearce, van Dooren and Connolly are apt to be read to engage these issues. A previous course in political theory is recommended. The class is organized around student presentations on assigned readings. Two papers, 10-12 pages in length. Extensive class discussion.

Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.398.  Politics Of Good & Evil.  3 Credits.  

The Politics of Good and Evil places a set of classic myths into conversation with recent philosophical and political work on existential questions. The myths include the Book of Job, Genesis (J version), two dramas by Sophocles, a selection from Augustine, and Voltaire’s Candide. Texts by Nietzsche (Thus Spoke Zarathustra), William James, (A Pluralistic Universe) and Connolly are then placed into conversation with both each other and these classic stories. Kohlberg’s The Sixth Extinction closes the class, encouraging us to think again about the relations between mythic orientations to responsibility, tragic possibility, nature/culture imbrications and the shape of contemporary life during the Anthropocene. Previous work in political theory is recommended. The course is devoted to “elemental theory”, in which diverse existential stories jostle each other and periodically disturb us, challenging us to explore new thoughts in a new world. One class presentation, two 10-12 page papers, and extensive class discussion.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.402.  Environmental Racism.  3 Credits.  

This is an undergraduate political theory seminar that addresses the disproportionate impact of environmental destruction on racially stigmatized populations. We shall examine the logics of power whereby the natural world is subjected to exploitation and domination, in tandem with the subordination of racial subjects historically identified as closer to nature. Likewise, we will explore political and theoretical challenges to environmental racism, such as those posed by indigenous communities, decolonial theory, and political movements contesting the intersection of racial inequalities and ecological crises.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.403.  Arendt/Foucault.  3 Credits.  

This upper-level undergraduate writing intensive course brings together the work of Hannah Arendt and Michel Foucault to focus on their critiques of modernity and their discussions of political change/revolution. Although Arendt and Foucault are often understood as coming from and supporting different political theoretical traditions, the course will also explore ways in which their shared debt to the work of Friedrich Nietzsche illuminates sometimes surprising commonalities and complementary positions. There is no final exam in this course but in addition to reading assignments, students will be required to write three papers.

Area: Humanities

Writing Intensive

AS.190.404.  Race and Debt: Living on Borrowed Time.  3 Credits.  

This is an advanced undergraduate seminar that explores how racial stigma functions as a marker of being always already in debt. In view of the legacies of settler-colonialism, imperialism and chattel slavery, how is it that those from whom so much has been taken are nevertheless regarded as perpetually in debt? We shall examine the moral, economic and racialized logics of power through which a range of political subjects come to be regarded as ungrateful “takers” as opposed to “makers,” and owing a debt to society. In so doing, we will investigate how temporality functions as a tool of power by considering how the indebted are made vulnerable to precarity, discipline, and disposability—in effect, forced to live life on borrowed time.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.405.  Food Politics.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the politics of food at the local, national, and global level. Topics include the politics of agricultural subsidies, struggles over genetically modified foods, government efforts at improving food safety, and issues surrounding obesity and nutrition policy. Juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.406.  The Executive Branch.  3 Credits.  

In the 19th Century America was noted for its courts, political parties and representative institutions. Today, America’s political parties and representative institutions have declined in importance while the institutions of the executive branch have increased in importance. This seminar will examine the nation’s key executive institutions and aspects of executive governance in the U.S. Students will alternate primary responsibility for week’s readings. Every student will prepare a 10-15 page review and critique of the books for which they are responsible in class.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.407.  Geopolitics, Nuclear Weapons and World Order.  3 Credits.  

Intensive examination of unresolved debates about the implications of nuclear weapons for world order, focusing on deterrence, strategy, arms control, multipolarity, proliferation, terrorism, and abolition, as well as roles of liberal, democratic, and constitutional political forms and popular public involvement. Readings from classic and contemporary sources.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.408.  Sovereignty: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Issues.  3 Credits.  

This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of the concept of sovereignty by examining its historical development, current controversies, and its salience in international relations scholarship. Works in political theory and the international law literature will also inform our discussion. The course is open to advanced undergraduate students with previous coursework in political science. .

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.409.  Research Seminar in State Politics.  3 Credits.  

The United States Constitution creates a federal system that leaves a great deal of power in the hands of the individual states. Each year, the states collectively adopt nearly 20,000 new laws, an average of 400 per state, while the U.S. Congress in recent years has on average enacted hardly more than 150 new statutes. In terms of spending, state and local governments collectively spent $3 trillion dollars last year–almost as much as the federal government. The states are especially important in the realms of education, health care, environmental policy and transportation. In all these areas, to be sure, the states share power with the federal government but possess considerable discretionary authority. Despite the importance of the states, most Americans know little about them. Hardly anyone knows much about their state’s executive branch or legislature. In a recent survey, most Americans couldn’t say whether their state had a constitution (they all do). In this seminar we will explore some of the mysteries of state politics. Each student will develop a research project designed to discover something about the states that no one else knows.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.410.  Beyond Bob Marley: Exploring the Rastafari Movement in the Greater Baltimore Area.  3 Credits.  

This course uses a community based learning approach to inquire into the presence of the Rastafari community in the Baltimore area. Most people will have heard of Rastafari through the music of Bob Marley. People might not know, however, that Rastafari emerges out of and has been part of a global history of liberation struggles. This course is co-taught with a local Rastafari organization. You will be intellectually and practically equipped to take part in a project of original research on the Rastafari presence in the Baltimore region, starting with the demonization of the movement in the 1980s “war on drugs” and including the movement’s response.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.412.  Political Violence.  3 Credits.  

An examination of the ways in which violence has been used to secure political ends. Topics include terrorism, assassination, genocide, coups, rebellions and war itself. Students examine what makes types of political violence unique and what unites them. (Formerly AS.190.372)

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.416.  Nuclear Weapons and World Politics.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the impact of nuclear weapons on international politics and world order. Topics to be considered include theories of deterrence, proliferation, the development of new weaponry, terrorism, defense, arms control and abolition. The effect of nuclear weapons on the existing state system and prospects for new configurations of world governance will also be addressed.

AS.190.419.  Race and Segregated Time.  3 Credits.  

This course explores how time, and not just space, is segregated along racial lines. We shall examine how racial injustices are experienced as impositions on human time, how resistance to racial inequality has often been figured in temporal terms, and what it means to think in untimely ways that challenge how the extended lifespans of racially dominant groups is contingent upon the foreshortened lifetimes of racial others. Readings will bring political theory into contact with contemporary experiences of race, such as: criminal (in)justice, environmental racism and the proliferation of human disposability. Recommended Course Background: One Political Theory course.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.421.  Violence: State and Society.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine violence that occurs mainly within the territory of nominally sovereign states. We will focus on violence as an object of study in its own right. For the most part, we will look at violence as a dependent variable, though in some instances it will function as an independent variable, a mechanism, or an equilibrium. We will ask why violence starts, how it “works” or fails to work, why it takes place in some locations and not others, why violence take specific forms (e.g., insurgency, terrorism, civilian victimization, etc.), what explains its magnitude (the number of victims), and what explains targeting (the type or identity of victims).

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.423.  Planetary Geopolitics.  3 Credits.  

With the tools of geopolitics, course explores political debates over globalization of machine civilization and changes in scope and pace, space and place, and role of nature in human affairs.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.424.  Policy Disasters.  3 Credits.  

Investigates the causes of large-scale policy disasters, examining the role of ideology, psychology, organization design and political incentives. Examples may be drawn from the Iraq War, Bay of Pigs, Hurricane Katrina, the U.S. Financial crisis, Shuttle Challenger disaster. economic development policy, privatization, and the Great Society. Limited to seniors or with permission of instructor. (CP / AP)

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.425.  The New Deal and American Politics.  3 Credits.  

This seminar explores how the New Deal, the fundamental moment in the post-Civil War United States, has structured politics and government across a variety of domains ever since. Topics include presidential leadership, executive power, political parties, labor, race, and the welfare state.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.426.  Qualitative Research.  3 Credits.  

This class is designed to introduce students to qualitative methodology. Practically, students will gain first-hand experience with qualitative research methods via research design, ethics review, in-depth interviewing, participant observation, and archival/primary source research. They will learn to deploy analytical techniques such as discourse analysis and process tracing. Students will also be asked to consider the merits of qualitative approaches more generally, and discuss the relative advantages of qualitative, experimental, and quantitative approaches. Questions that we will discuss include: What place should qualitative research have in a research design? Can qualitative research test hypotheses, or only generate them? Can qualitative research explain social phenomena, or only interpret them? What are the disadvantages and advantages of qualitative approaches compared to quantitative approaches? For what kinds of research questions are ethnographic techniques best suited? Is replicability possible for ethnographic field research? What criteria of evidence and analytical rigor apply on this terrain?

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.427.  Political Economy of Japan and Korea.  3 Credits.  

This upper-level seminar examines some of the major debates and issues of postwar Japanese and South Korean political economy. Topics include nationalism, gender politics, civil society, immigration, and US-Japan-South Korea trilateral relations.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.428.  The Politics of Disaster in the Middle East and Beyond.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the politics of natural and man-made disasters, including war, forced migration, drought, famine, earthquakes, tsunamis, storms, and epidemics. Focusing on the Middle East, it also presents comparative cases from Africa, South and Southeast Asia, and North America. In doing so, the class will examine the unique ways that different types of disasters interact with governance structures; social and economic inequalities; medical infrastructure; gender; race and ethnicity; and political cleavages. Throughout the course, students will learn basic elements of research design and methods in addition to welcoming experienced disaster response and analysis practitioners to class. Finally, the Politics of Disaster in the Middle East and Beyond addresses some of the philosophical aspects of working in and studying disaster-affected contexts, bringing an ethical sensibility to policy-relevant analysis.

AS.190.429.  The Political Bases of the Market Economy.  3 Credits.  

Although “the market” is conventionally understood as separate from “politics”, the modern market economy did not arise in a political vacuum. In fact, the very separation between the economy and politics is itself the product of a politically potent set of ideas. This course is an upper-division reading seminar on the origins and evolution of the modern market economy. Readings will include Smith, Marx, Weber, Polanyi, Keynes, Hayek, Friedman, Becker, and Foucault. Recommended course background: Introduction to comparative politics OR any college-level course in social or political theory.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.430.  Time and Punishment.  3 Credits.  

“If you can’t do the time, don’t do the crime.” According to ask.com, this common expression was made popular in the 1970s by the theme song for the television show “Beretta.” Aside from amusing us with the irony that the star of “Beretta” was Robert Blake who was later charged with the murder of Bony Lee Bakely, the expression raises a profound issue: What is the relationship between punishment and time? This course will explore that question. Topics to be discussed include different philosophical understandings and experiences of time, views of mortality and fate, theories of punishment, specific punishments in the U.S. (including sentences of juveniles, life, death, and LWOP), as well as punishments that are not specifically meted out but are known to be the consequences of political, social, and economic circumstance. Students will read texts in criminology, political theory, philosophy, and jurisprudence, as well as a selection of Supreme Court cases, novels, and short stories. This writing intensive course is limited to undergraduates who have taken at least one “Classics of Political Thought” course (190.280, 190.281, 190.282, or 190.283).

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.431.  Global Climate Governance.  3 Credits.  

This course will offer an in-depth study of the history and politics of global climate governance. It will examine the central actors, agreements, and policy proposals that shape climate governance.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.432.  Topics in Global Security Politics.  3 Credits.  

Intensive examination of catastrophic and existential risks posed by natural and technogenic sources (including nanotechnology, synthetic biology, cyberwar, artificial intelligence, asteroidal collision, climate change and space colonization) and their political implications

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.433.  Race and the Politics of Punishment in the US.  3 Credits.  

Contact with criminal justice has become a primary way that many Americans see and experience government, particularly those from race-class subjugated communities. Yet, our field has been slow to appreciate the development of the carceral state or to consider its manifold for citizenship. In this advanced undergraduate seminar, we will survey key debates around punishment, state violence, and surveillance, with a particular focus on research that takes institutional development, history and racial orders seriously. Why did the carceral state expand in "fits and starts" and with what consequence for state-building? We explore its (racialized and gendered) relationship to other key systems: foster care, social provision, labor relations and the labor market, and immigration enforcement. A core preoccupation of this course will be to understand the ways in which the criminal justice system "makes race" and how debates about crime and punishment were often debates about black inclusion and equality. How does exposure to criminal justice interventions shape political learning, democratic habits, and racial lifeworlds? In addition to policy, political discourse, and racial politics, we will employ works from a range of fields - history, sociology, law and criminology - and a range of methods (ethnography, historical analysis, quantitative and qualitative). Required books include: Khalil Muhammad's Condemnation of Blackness: race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, Elizabeth Hinton's From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime, David Oshinsky's Worse than Slavery: Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice, Bruce Western's Punishment and Inequality in America, and Michael Fortner's Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.434.  Does Israel Have a Future?.  3 Credits.  

Israel is one of the only countries whose existence is openly challenged. This class will examine the future of Israel focusing on international and domestic threats to its continued existence as a Jewish democracy. Outside threats to be considered include nuclear attack and the growing international movement to delegitimize Israel. domestic challenges include demographic changes, the role of religion in governance, and doubts as to whether one can be a Jewish state and still be a democracy. Lessons from the destruction of the ancient Israelite kingdoms and from contemporary state deaths will be included. The course will conclude by considering efforts that Israel can undertake to meet the threats it faces.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.437.  Race and Ethnic Politics in the United States.  3 Credits.  

Race has been and continues to be centrally important to American political life and development. In this course, we will engage with the major debates around racial politics in the United States, with a substantial focus on how policies and practices of citizenship, immigration law, social provision, and criminal justice policy shaped and continue to shape racial formation, group-based identities, and group position; debates around the content and meaning of political representation and the responsiveness of the political system to American minority groups; debates about how racial prejudice has shifted and its importance in understanding American political behavior; the prospects for contestation or coalitions among groups; the “struggle with difference” within groups as they deal with the interplay of race and class, citizenship status, and issues that disproportionately affect a subset of their members; and debates about how new groups and issues are reshaping the meaning and practice of race in the United States.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.438.  Violence and Politics.  3 Credits.  

This seminar will address the role of violence–both domestic and international–in political life. Though most claim to abhor violence, since the advent of recorded history, violence and politics have been intimately related. States practice violence against internal and external foes. Political dissidents engage in violence against states. Competing political forces inflict violence upon one another. Writing in 1924, Winston Churchill declared–and not without reason–that, "The story of the human race is war." Indeed, violence and the threat of violence are the most potent forces in political life. It is, to be sure, often averred that problems can never truly be solved by the use of force. Violence, the saying goes, is not the answer. This adage certainly appeals to our moral sensibilities. But whether or not violence is the answer presumably depends upon the question being asked. For better or worse, it is violence that usually provides the most definitive answers to three of the major questions of political life--statehood, territoriality and power. Violent struggle, in the form of war, revolution, civil war, terrorism and the like, more than any other immediate factor, determines what states will exist and their relative power, what territories they will occupy, and which groups will and will not exercise power within them. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.439.  Advanced Topics in Global Politics: Learning Through Research.  3 Credits.  

Join a research team. In this course, students will explore topics in global politics and methods for the conduct of inquiry in the Johns Hopkins tradition of learning through research. Under the guidance of the professor, students will learn about a topic from existing primary and secondary sources, collect new empirical evidence, analyze the evidence, and contribute to research products. Recommended for students planning to write a thesis.Junior or Senior standing in Political Science or International Studies or permission of instructor.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.440.  European Politics in Comparative Perspective.  3 Credits.  

Europe has been in a sense the first testing ground for theories of comparative politics, but many outsiders now see Europe as a pacified and somewhat boring place. This course will question conventional wisdom through an examination of European politics in historical and cross-national perspective. We will apply the comparative method to the study of European politics today, and conversely we will ask what Europe tells us more generally about politics. We will see that Europe is still a locus of intense conflict as well as remarkably diverse experimentation. Topics will include: political, legal, and economic governance; the evolution of democracy and fundamental rights, the welfare state, class stratification, immigration and race, the role of religion; European integration and globalization. Recommended background: Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.442.  Civil Society.  3 Credits.  

This course explores classic and contemporary debates on the concept of civil society and critically examines its analytical value in light of recent developments. Topics include the relationship between civil society, the state, and markets, the role of civil society in development and democratization, social capital, and global civil society. This course is open to graduate students from any discipline. Advanced undergraduate students must obtain permission from the instructor and are expected to keep up with graduate students during class discussions.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.443.  Politics of Outer Space.  3 Credits.  

Intensive examination of the political aspects of human activities in outer space, past, present and future, with focus on militarization, earth-remote sensing, surveillance, navigation, resource exploitation, the Outer Space Treaty, and colonization.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.444.  Causes of Peace.  3 Credits.  

Since 1945, the great powers have enjoyed their longest period of peace in history. Interstate conflict between lesser powers is also at an all time low. What accounts for this “long peace?” This course will look at various explanations including the spread of democracy , the proliferation of nuclear weapons, globalization, American hegemony, and fundamental changes in attitudes regarding the use of force. Students will present draft versions of their research papers during the last weeks of the course. Co-listed with AS.190.619

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.445.  Power and Wealth: Sources, Dynamics and Linkages.  3 Credits.  

This seminar explores theoretical approaches to the multiple relations between political power and economic power, including pluralism, Marxism, and historical institutionalism. Major empirical transformations will provide the motivation: the rise of modern states, capitalism and social classes in Early Modern Europe, the creation of highly unequal societies in post-colonial Latin America and Africa, the varieties of Welfare State in the golden age of advanced capitalism (1950-75), and the powerful rebirth of inequality in advanced economies for the last 25 years. Theories of sources and interactions of political and economic power will be coupled with accounts of the effects of power and wealth on macroscopic change, especially democratization and economic development. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.451.  Geopolitics.  3 Credits.  

Intensive exploration of theories of how geography, ecology, and technology shape political orders. Case studies of ancient, early modern, global, and contemporary topics, including European ascent, industrial revolution, tropics and North South divide, climate change, geo-engineering and global commons (oceans, atmosphere and orbital space

Writing Intensive

AS.190.452.  Party Politics from the Founding to the Progressives.  3 Credits.  

Though the torchlight parade has long since passed, American parties still stand in the shadow of the nineteenth-century Party Period. This course seeks to untangle the ideologies and practices of party politics from the Founding to the Progressive Era. Topics include the rise of mass parties, political violence, the coming of the Republican Party, the party politics of Reconstruction and westward expansion, corruption and the political machine, Populism, and movements for reform. We pay particular attention to comparisons between past and present, and to opportunities taken and foregone.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.455.  Comparative Racial Politics.  3 Credits.  

This upper-level seminar surveys the major trends and approaches to the comparative study of race in political science and critically examines the link between race and politics. Topics include race and state formation, citizenship and national membership, immigration, racial regimes, and the political economy of race. Recommended background: Courses in comparative politics, political economy, immigration, and racial politics

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.456.  Politics of TransHumanism.  3 Credits.  

Examination of politics of human biological and cybernetic augmentation, and replacement with focus on stratification, weaponization, collectivization, extinction and irregulation.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.471.  The University and Society.  3 Credits.  

In the 20th century, American universities became the envy of the world, leading in most categories of scholarly productivity and attracting students from every nation. In recent years, though, American higher education has come to face a number of challenges including rapidly rising costs, administrative bloat, corporatization and moocification. We will examine the problems and promises of American higher education, the political struggles within the university and the place of the university in the larger society. Upper classes and Grad Students only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.473.  Political Polarization.  3 Credits.  

The American constitutional order, which was designed to operate without political parties, now has parties as divided as any in the democratic world. This course will examine explanations of how this happened, the consequences of party polarization for public policy and governance, and what if anything should be done about it.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.479.  Imag(in)ing Cities.  3 Credits.  

Cities exert a substantial degree of control over American life. Throughout the 20th and early years of the 21st Century they have been centers of industry, of social change, of political change. And in part because of their status, scholars have begun to theorize about cities. The purpose of this class is to interrogate these theories through a filmic lens. Students will be exposed to readings and then in the second half of the semester, to films about cities that implicitly and explicitly speak to and about these theories. Some coursework in urban studies preferred, though not necessary.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.480.  Planetary Interdependence and World Governments.  3 Credits.  

Intensive exploration of alternative global political architectures for high levels of security, ecological and internet interdependence

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.481.  Conservatism and Crime.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine the evolution of conservative thought on crime and criminal justice from the 1960s to the present. We will focus in particular on how the subject of crime illuminates different strains of conservatism, reveals tensions between its values of liberty, authority and anti-statism, and shows the changing approach that conservative intellectuals have had to race.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.498.  Thesis Colloquium.  3 Credits.  

Open to and required for Political Science majors writing a thesis. International Studies majors writing a senior thesis under the supervision of a Political Science Department faculty member may also enroll. Topics include: research design, literature review, evidence collection and approaches to analysis of evidence, and the writing process. The course lays the groundwork for completing the thesis in the second semester under the direction of the faculty thesis supervisor. Students are expected to have decided on a research topic and arranged for a faculty thesis supervisor prior to the start of the semester. Seniors. Under special circumstances, juniors will be allowed to enroll. Enrollment limit: 15.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.499.  Senior Thesis.  3 Credits.  

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.501.  Internship-Political Science.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.502.  Political Science Internship.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.503.  Internship-International Relations.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.504.  Internship-International Relations.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.506.  International Studies Internship.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.535.  Independent Study - Freshmen.  3 Credits.  

Permission required.

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.536.  Independent Study-Freshmen.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.537.  Independent Study-Sophomores.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.538.  Independent Study-Sophomores.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.539.  Independent Study-Juniors.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.540.  Independent Study-Juniors.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.541.  Independent Study-Seniors.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.542.  Independent Study-Seniors.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.543.  Independent Research.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.544.  Independent Research.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.550.  Internship.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.592.  Summer Internship.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.598.  Independent Study.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.599.  Research - Summer.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.190.601.  Qualitative Research.  

This class is designed to introduce students to qualitative methodology. Practically, students will gain first hand experience with qualitative research methods via research design, ethics review, in-depth interviewing, participant observation, and archival/primary source research. They will learn to deploy analytical techniques such as discourse analysis and process tracing. Students will also be asked to consider the merits of qualitative approaches more generally, and discuss the relative advantages of qualitative, experimental, and quantitative approaches. Questions that we will discuss include: What place should qualitative research have in a research design? Can qualitative research test hypotheses, or only generate them? Can qualitative research explain social phenomena, or only interpret them? What are the disadvantages and advantages of qualitative approaches compared to quantitative approaches? For what kinds of research questions are ethnographic techniques best suited? Is replicability possible for ethnographic field research? What criteria of evidence and analytical rigor apply on this terrain?

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.602.  Introduction to Quantitative Political Science.  

An introduction to measurement and data analysis in contemporary American political science. Measurement topics will include the formation of indices and cumulative scales. Analytic topics will topics include sampling variations, statistical association and causation, as manifested in contingency tables and correlation and regression. Emphasis will be on fundamental concepts and assumptions, and on comprehension and evaluation of the scholarly literature. Advanced undergraduates by permission only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.604.  Foucault and Kant.  

This seminar will explore Kant and Foucault comparatively across the registers of ontology, morality, epistemology, time, and politics. How does each move into and across these registers? How do the two thinkers inform and challenge one another? Texts will include: Kant, The Critique of Practical Reason, Conflict of the Faculties, Perpetual Peace and Other Essays, The Anthropology (sections); Foucault, The Order of Things (chapters), Discipline and Punish, “On the Genealogy of Ethics,” “What Was Enlightenment?”, and Subjectivity and Truth.

AS.190.605.  Enviromental racism.  

Environmental racism has largely been understood in terms of environmental policy-making that discriminates against people of color, particularly with respect to the state-sanctioned siting of toxic waste facilities, the distribution of pollutants, food-deserts, and the exclusion of non-white peoples from leading positions in the environmental movement. This graduate seminar explores environmental racism more broadly, pushing beyond its conventional, place-based understandings and approaching the corresponding logics that produce human disposability and environmental waste from the standpoint of both space and time. Examining colonial legacies of coding racial others in terms natural disasters, epidemics, infestations, non-human animals and dirt, we shall investigate how the natural world is subjected to exploitation and domination in tandem with the subordination of racial subjects historically identified with nature and rendered expendable. In other words, we shall illuminate the logics of power through which race-making coincides with waste-making. Accordingly, we will explore political and theoretical challenges to environmental racism in multiple registers; such as those posed by indigenous studies, decolonial thinkers and Afro-diasporic theories contesting the intersection of racial biopolitics, ecological crises and racial capitalism in an era of proliferating human disposability. Authors considered may include; Mbembe, Du Bois, Hage, Glissant, Césaire, Wynter & Chakrabarty.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.606.  Nuclear Weapons and World Order.  

This course examines the impact of nuclear weapons on international politics and world order. Topics to be considered include theories of deterrence, proliferation, the development of new weaponry, terrorism, defense, arms control and abolition. The effect of nuclear weapons on the existing state system and prospects for new configurations of world governance will also be addressed.

AS.190.607.  Decolonizing the Episteme: Knowledge, Empire and the Academy.  

What complicity does the Western academy have with empire? How might the development of certain intellectual dispositions be implicated in the challenges of imperial rule? And how might such implications have produced influential concepts and theories? In this course we will consider the ways in which - and extent to which - the academy’s claim to epistemic privilege has a colonial provenance. Seniors permitted with instructor permission only.

AS.190.608.  Influx and Efflux.  

“While many contemporary philosophies of the self, and of human agency, tend to emphasize the activity of expression -- the enactment or externalization of an intention, desire, will, or purpose, this course will explore the process through which the outside comes in. Influence: the default condition of intrinsically porous and relational bodies. We will examine different models of the process through which individuals are psychically and physiologically affected by forces, shapes, ideas, affects, and tendencies coming from the "outside." Readings include Walt Whitman's experimentation with the democratic potential of "sympathy," Alfred North Whitehead's theory of "affective tone" (which focuses on unconscious and in-sensible modes of influence), Roger Caillois's theory of the "instinct of abandon" (developed at the time of an emergent fascism in Europe), and contemporary theories (in behavioral psychology and cognitive science) of embodied cognition.”

AS.190.609.  Law, Critique, Genealogy.  

This course will offer a survey of classical and contemporary trends in critical theory through the prism of the law. The readings will trace the development of two modes of critical reflection emerging from Kant’s philosophical project, critique and genealogy, exploring the tensions between them through the study of categories such as judgment, case, and jurisdiction. We will examine how these categories themselves reflect the question of “modernity” and the Enlightenment as that question is posed and answered by thinkers from Kant to Foucault and Habermas and beyond.To ground this study, we will focus on critical engagements with human rights, property, and institutional justice around the world. Within an arch of readings that goes from Kant to Butler, the course will include key texts by Hegel, Marx, Benjamin, Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Habermas, Foucault, and Nancy, as well as texts drawn from critical legal studies and the anthropology of law and justice. There are no prerequisites for this interdisciplinary course. To receive credit, students will be required to attend seminar, prepare for class discussions, and turn in a 20-30 page final research paper, a draft of which will be presented at a workshop at the end of the year.

AS.190.610.  Process Philosophies and Political Manifestos.  

What do the process philosophies of Bergson, Whitehead and Daoism have to say to political manifestos advanced by writers such as Marx and Engels, Naomi Klein, Hardt and Negri, Dziga Vertov, Haitian and French revolutionaries, Folco Portinari. How, in turn, can the latter illuminate, deform, or inform them? The readings in this seminar bounce back and forth between the cosmic politics of process philosophy and a variety of short manifestos designed to speak to the vicissitudes of today.

AS.190.612.  Comparative Citizenship and Immigration Politics.  

Graduate students only. Examines the contemporary political dynamics of migration, citizenship, and race concentrating on North America, Europe and East Asia. We will focus on how citizenship and immigration policies shape immigrant political identities, claims, and strategies as well as how immigrants impact public debates and policies in receiving societies.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.613.  Political Arts: Dada, Surrealism, and Societal Transformation.  

An exploration of the political aims and tactics, and strengths and liabilities, of Dada and Surrealism, as it operated in Europe and the Americas in the years between and after the World Wars. Readings by Andre Breton, Leonora Carrington, Georges Bataille, Roger Caillois, Meret Oppenheim, College of Sociology, and others. Seniors allowed by permission of instructor only.

AS.190.614.  Nietzsche and Deleuze.  

This seminar examines key texts by Nietzsche and Deleuze to see how the former influenced the latter and how, where and why Deleuze breaks the Nietzschean influence. Both are known for rethinking radically agency, nature, time, ethics, culture, explanation, politics and the multiple intersections between them. Deleuze treats Nietzsche as a key figure in the “minor” tradition that challenges western “majoritarian” Christian and secular thought. Both are attuned to the role of affective communication, the severe limits of human exceptionalism in Christianity and secularism, the ubiquity of heterogeneous connections, the pursuit of affirmative attachments, the exploration of tragic possibility, and the grasp of unruly periods in nature. While reading Nietzsche might help us to understand otherwise opaque moments in Deleuze (and vice versa) Deleuze can also be said to twist and turn Nietzsche’s thought, as he pulls it to the political left, examines the global capitalist “axiomatic”, explores "nomadic" science, embraces critical social movements, pursues a world of intersecting “minorities”, and emphasizes the rhizomatic character of culture/nature connections. The texts read by Nietzsche texts may include Daybreak, sections from The Gay Science, The Genealogy of Morals and sections from Will to Power. D(&G) texts may include Difference and Repetition, sections from A Thousand Plateaus, What is Philosophy? and The Fold. Untimely Interventions from Simondon, C Keller, Whitehead, L. Margulis, I Stengers, N. Lawtoo, or B. Massumi could be “folded” into the mix.

AS.190.616.  American Political Development.  

An examination of state-building and nation-building throughout American political history. (AP)

AS.190.618.  What Was/Is Fascism?.  

An examination of texts on twentieth century fascist movements and societies in relation to twenty first century movements. What roles do capitalism, imperialism, racism, democracy, the media, global processes and planetary processes play in them? To what extent does the production and exploitation of resentiment shape their intensities? What rhetorical strategies mobilize such movements? What rhetorics and social movements to resist or retune such movements show promise? Texts by Hitler, Arendt, Neumann, Adorno, Marcuse, Deleuze and Kenneth Burke may be among those included. Perhaps the films “Our Hitler” and “The Conformist”, plus a couple of speeches by Donald Trump will be included. Conceptions to democracy first united to challenge fascist drive will also be explored.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.619.  Great Powers in the Middle East and North Africa.  

How have Great Powers shaped the history and politics of states in the Middle East and North Africa? For over a century, Great Powers have been extensively involved in the region: they established colonies, protectorates, and mandates during colonial period; afterward, they employed military force to constrain and shape regimes. Focusing primarily on Great Britain, France, and the United States, this course examines the causes and consequences of foreign military intervention from colonial conquest through the post-colonial period. Students will critically assess claims that link Great Power actions to current-day conditions in the region through evaluating contemporary scholarship and analyzing the history of selected cases.

AS.190.620.  Juris-Fiction.  

In Twilight of the Idols/The Anti-Christ, Nietzsche famously confessed, “I am afraid we are not rid of God because we still have faith in grammar.” Drawing from scholarship identified with the Law and Literature movement as well as philosophy, jurisprudence, literary theory, and political theory, this course will engage an on-going conversation about the capacity of language to invent and enforce the expectations, regulations, and ritual formulas we know as law. Readings will include texts by classical and contemporary scholars, including Arendt, Plato, Pierce, Nietzsche, and Nancy, as well as stories by Borges, Kafka, and Melville.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.621.  Poesis and Politics.  

This graduate seminar will investigate how an aesthetic approach to political concepts and practices – in particular the concept of the polity and the practice of judgment – responds to, troubles, and complicates political thought. In the company of Plato, Kant, Heidegger, Arendt, and Auden, we will explore two related sets of questions. First, what are the advantages and disadvantages of figuring the polity as a work of art or as an artistic creation? Second, how might poetry play a role in politics? Students will be required to submit weekly response papers and write a final 20-30 page paper on a topic related to the course, drawing on the work of at least two of the thinker-poets discussed.

AS.190.622.  Republicanism, Realism, and Liberalism.  

Close reading of major texts in western political thought on violence, security and politics developed by republicans, realists and liberals

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.623.  Law's Love: Command, Submission, Obligation, Power.  

This course focuses on the affective dimensions of law, a power that both creates and preserves the system of rules which a particular country or community recognizes as regulating the actions of its members and which it may enforce by the imposition of penalties. Two related questions will guide our examination of the affection dimensions of law: What are the grounds of law? Why do we obey law? Students will turn in response papers every week on the reading. In addition, there will be a 20-30 page paper due at the end of the semester.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.624.  Postcolonial Ecologies and Planetary Temporalities.  

This is an exploratory seminar in which we place recent work on postcolonial ecology and images of time into conjunction with geological and philosophical texts detailing a world of multiple, interfolding human and nonhuman temporalities. The task is to see how each set of readings can enrich and exert pressure upon the others with respect to theory and politics. Texts may include Rob Nixon, The Environmentalism of the Poor; Viveiros de Castro, The Relative Native: Indigenous Conceptual Worlds; Michael Benton, When Life Nearly Died; Donna Haraway, Staying With the Trouble; Deleuze and Guattari, What is Philosophy?; Connolly, Facing the Planetary; Glissant, The Poetics of Relation, Nabokov, A Forest of Time

Writing Intensive

AS.190.625.  Theories of Comparative Politics.  

This seminar is intended for graduate students planning to take the comprehensive exam in comparative politics, either as a major or as a minor. In addition to exploring central methodological debates and analytic approaches, the seminar reviews the literature on state-society relations, political and economic development, social movements, nationalism, revolutions, formal and informal political institutions, and regime durability vs. transition. Graduate students only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.626.  Quantitative Methods for the Study of Politics.  

This course is intended as Ph.D.-level introduction to applied statistics, with a focus on the identification of causal effects in the tradition of the Neyman/Rubin potential outcomes framework. Prior coursework in applied statistics or quantitative methods will be useful but is not required. Upon completion of the course, students will be in a position to understand and critically assess scholarship that uses instrumental variables, difference-in-differences, regression discontinuity, and other quasi- and natural-experimental research designs. Formal mathematical proof will be kept to a minimum. Students will be asked to adapt existing code and write some of their own code in R.

AS.190.627.  Gilles Deleuze and Classical Theory.  

What can Deleuze teach classical Eurocentric theories? And what can representatives of those traditions teach him? We will read Deleuze in relation to theorists he has examined, such as Plato, Lucretius, Spinoza, Kant, Kafka, Nietzsche and Hegel, as we seek to hear the history of political theory in a new key. Concepts and issues such as politics, history, time, culture/nature divisions, capitalism, the source of ethics, the shape of political ideals, and the nature of explanation will come up for review. The course will typically read a text from a classical thinker and then consult Deleuze’s engagements with them.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.628.  Hobbes & Spinoza.  

A close reading of Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) and Ethics by Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677), with consideration of important commentaries on these works. What conceptions of the human being, nature, reason, God, and freedom are defended and affirmed by Hobbes and Spinoza? What rhetorical strategies accompany their theories of self, ethics, social life?

AS.190.629.  American Racial Politics.  

Race is not a biological fact but rather a social construction. However, it is a social construction with very real consequences. Definitions of citizenship, allocation of state resources, attitudes about government and government policy, the creation of government policy, all shape and are shaped by race and racial classifications. Serving as a critical corrective to American politics treatments that ignore race, this class will examine how race functions politically in the United States. While not required, some knowledge of statistics is helpful.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.631.  Making Social Policy.  

Examines American social policy in comparative perspective. Special attention to issues of poverty and inequality, and their relation to the political system.

AS.190.632.  The Development of American Political Institutions.  

This course explores institutional development in American national politics, from the Founding until the present. It traces parties, Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, and courts, and also examines how those institutions have interacted with one another across American history. Throughout the course, we will consider how ideas, interests, procedures, and sequence together shape institutions as they collide and abrade over time. Finally, although it hardly covers the entire corpus across the subfield, the course is also designed to prepare students to sit for comprehensive examinations in American politics.

AS.190.633.  Black Political Thought.  

This course will introduce you to a survey of Black political thought. Our examination will cover the time period between the latter years of the Transatlantic Slave Trade and the present. In the first two thirds of the course we will deal with primary texts (including but not limited to Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, The Souls of Black Folk, and The Wretched of the Earth), and in the last third we will deal with modern day attempts to wrestle with the ideas in these texts (including but not limited to Intimate Justice and Critique of Black Reason).

AS.190.634.  Political Corruption.  

Political corruption is widely seen to be an impediment to economic and political development and stability. But what is political corruption? The common definition of corruption as abuse of power for private gain is too vague to be of serious scholarly use. Is “abuse” culturally specific or merely a synonym for “illegal” - or even worse, for undesirable according to some unspecified standard? Does “private gain” refer only to under-the-table cash payments to a corrupt official, or does it extend to intangible private benefits, and does it extend to gains for identifiable favored groups (“club goods”) and may or may not include the corrupt official him or herself?This seminar will focus on several questions. How should political corruption be defined, and what is at stake in the choice if definition? Are there identifiable patterns to, or types of, political corruption? What conditions encourage or discourage corruption, and how might corruption be controlled or limited? What are the consequences of corruption - and are they necessarily all negative?

AS.190.635.  Theories of Constitutional Governance.  

This class is focused on the nature of constitutions and the way that they should and do work within a political system, with particular emphasis on the U.S. context. We will examine both normative and empirical arguments about the relationship between politics and constitutional law. More specifically, we will think about how societies and individual actors should make meaning out of constitutional texts, how they do seem to make meaning out of those texts, and the conditions that give rise to constitutional drafting and change. Graduate students only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.636.  Politics of Information and Information Technologies.  

What information is and how it flows in the world are questions that are now obviously relevant to the fraught politics of today. We live in a time in which the facticity and authenticity of information is often questioned, in which the flood of “too much” information is often blamed for problematic outcomes, and in which information technologies and social media have (perhaps) upended previous expectations about how communication happens. This course explores the politics of information and information technologies from ancient times to the present, drawing from a substantial body of scholarship in political science and other fields to apply older and more recent wisdom to contemporary problems. Among the themes to be explored are: the differences between knowledge, information, and data; embodied (corporeal) information; commodification of information; securitization of information; technological change, information, and the political; information, cyberspace, and governance; and information privacy/transparency. And, of course: “fake news,” “cyber,” and “bots.”

AS.190.637.  The Colonial Constitution of the "Human".  

This course inquires into the colonial constitution of the "human" across philosophical, legal, political, social and economic dimensions. Special attention is paid to the ways in which sexuality, gender, race, class and faith are complicit in this constitution. The course finishes by critically considering theories of the "post-human" from the perspective of both a colonial genealogy of the "human" and anti-colonial claims upon humanism.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.638.  Racial Capitalism.  

This graduate seminar will explore the imbrication of the theory, history, and politics of the logic of race and the logic of capital.

AS.190.639.  Critical IR Theories.  

Generally relegated to the last week or two on the standard IR theory syllabus, critical IR theories take center stage in this course. We explore the intellectual roots of clusters of critical theories, the foundational works for each cluster, and the current debate. The course will cover Feminist IR Theory, the Practice Turn, and New Materialist IR, among other perspectives.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.640.  Modes of Political Persuasion.  

An examination of influential texts in Euro-American political thought, with an eye toward what each has to say about the “how-to” of political persuasion: What techniques can leaders, citizens, and theorists deploy to foster allegiance or conversion to a particular model of politics and public life? How are the powers of words, images, and feelings, especially eros, invoked and inflected? Given that being persuaded of something may or may not induce a will to enact it, what techniques are available to jump the gap between profession of ideals and undertaking of action? Texts include Aristophanes' Women Celebrating the Thesmophoria; Plato's Phaedrus and Books II and III of Republic; Machiavelli's Prince, Whitman's "Calamus" poems, Freud's Civilization and Its Discontents, Foucault's writings on sexuality and ancient Greek ethical practices, and Beauvoir's Ethics of Ambiguity and "Must We Burn Sade."

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.641.  Race and Ethnic Politics in the United States.  

Race has been and continues to be centrally important to American political life and development. In this course, we will engage with the major debates around racial politics in the United States, with a substantial focus on how policies and practices of citizenship, immigration law, social provision, and criminal justice policy shaped and continue to shape racial formation, group-based identities, and group position; debates around the content and meaning of political representation and the responsiveness of the political system to American minority groups; debates about how racial prejudice has shifted and its importance in understanding American political behavior; the prospects for contestation or coalitions among groups; the “struggle with difference” within groups as they deal with the interplay of race and class, citizenship status, and issues that disproportionately affect a subset of their members; and debates about how new groups and issues are reshaping the meaning and practice of race in the United States.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.642.  Institutions, Power, Ideas and Practices.  

Comparative politics scholars have long identified institutions as a crucial source of cross-national variation in political life. Yet institutions are not static. We know from everyday experience that institutions change over time, sometimes quite fast. Scholars have attempted to address the problem of institutional change in various ways. Some institutionalist scholars underscore the endogenous logic of institutional evolution, whereas others resort to exogenous factors such as power. Constructivist and pragmatist scholars foreground ideas and practices as sources of institutional change. This course will explore these different strands of scholarship and attempt to reconstruct a fruitful dialogue between them."

AS.190.643.  Practice and Process in International Relations Theory.  

This course covers a series of special topics in IR theory with an emphasis on how an appreciation of practices and process provides a fresh perspective on old questions and raises new ones. The course will focus on the pertinent sociological literature and how this has been applied in IR.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.645.  Black Politics.  

Grad Students Only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.648.  Indigenous Political Theory.  

This graduate seminar will examine a range of indigenous political theorists and critics of settler colonialism. In so doing, we will interrogate the role of liberal Anglo-centrism in contested theories and practices of sovereignty, property rights, freedom, equality, race, sexuality and nature. Likewise, we will investigate the contention that settler colonialism is acquisitive of territory in perpetuity, as opposed to being a moment in history, in order to assess the enduring political and theoretical impact of colonial legacies. Importantly, we shall explore how the relays between indigenous cosmologies and temporalities shape theories and practices of resistance, reason, identity and political imagination.Graduate students only.

AS.190.649.  The Economic and the Political.  

The neoclassical paradigm of economics utterly excludes politics, yet a large swath of the subfield of “political economy” presupposes or is predicated upon that very paradigm. Neither approach can account for the distinct force of “the economic” as it continually interacts with “the political” (and the social, the cultural, etc.) This graduate seminar will be an experimental effort in exploring a whole new terrain of the economic — not another critique of the neoclassical paradigm, but the initial (re)formulation of a new approach to the economic and the political.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.650.  The Theories and Politics of Rights.  

Grad Students only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.651.  Policy Dynamics.  

Policy dynamics is the study of changes of the political system in its entirety, from the point of view of the system's outputs--what government actually does, or fails to do. It is dynamic in that it seeks to explain changes in what matters governments feel can or must be addressed, the tools that are available to deal with problems, and the interactions of government and non-government actors that generate change. Particular emphasis will be placed on studying policy dynamics over long periods of time, including such post-enactment issues as implementation, policy feedback on political identities and group formation, and policy durability.

AS.190.652.  The Politics of Money, Debt and Credit.  

This course will survey recent scholarship on the politics of monetary and financial flows in the economy. We will reflect on the significance and causes of changes in underlying political economy and institutions since the mid-20th century. We will pay special attention to the rise of a new political economy often characterized as neoliberal, and we will discuss how scholars within and beyond political science make sense of these changes.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.653.  Organizations.  

Graduate students only. "Organizations are the fundamental building blocks of economic, social and political life. This course will examine how different disciplines (sociology, economics, political science) approach the problem of explaining how organizations operate, as well as exploring the structure and development of a very wide range of organizations (firms, interest groups, charitable foundations, universities, militaries, bureaucracies, international organizations, and professions)."

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.654.  The Development of the Conservative Movement.  

The last twenty years has seen a flourishing of literature on conservatism across multiple disciplines. This course will survey that literature, placing it in a developmental context. Particular focus will be placed on the relationship between elite and mass conservatism, especially in the light of the rise of populism in the US, UK and elsewhere.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.655.  Decolonizing Time and Memory.  

This graduate seminar is a critical encounter with the colonial imprint on the politics of memory, temporality and race. We shall investigate the recent turn to “decolonize” virtually everything and ask what such efforts might entail given that the hallmarks of colonialism include a disavowal of the past, the capacity to set the clock to zero and begin the world anew, a linear conception of time and an abiding desire for temporal sovereignty. While investigating the possibility of decolonizing futurity, we will pay particular attention to the Promethean construction of the human race (and its constitutive others) across history. We shall confront the role of segregated temporality and mnemonic politics in modern race-making projects and their impact on the contemporary political imagination. Authors may include Nietzsche, Wynter, Fanon, Foucault, Deleuze, Anzaldúa, Baldwin, & Du Bois.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.656.  Sovereignty: Historical Persepectives and Contemporary Issues.  

This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of the concept of sovereignty by examining its historical development and its use in international relations scholarship. Our discussion will also be informed by works in political theory and the international law literature. The course is open to advanced undergraduate students and graduate students. Co-listed with AS.190.408

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.657.  Re-Turn to Language.  

A central claim of structuralism is that all systems of meaning are structured along the lines of language. Post-structuralism challenges this claim but does not dismiss it so much as probe the ways in which these systems fail and reveal interesting things about how communication may (not) take place. What is sometimes called "post-post-structuralism" rejects the focus on language, emphasing instead how meaning is generated in and by culture or with the (mostly) unacknowledged collaboration of matter. This course will revisit these claims, challenges, and refusals within the context of contemporary, philosophy, literary theory, and political thought. We will read, among others, texts by Saussure, Liev-Strauss, Lacan, Barthes, Derrida, Foucault, Kristeva, Butler, and Barad. Students will be required to submit weekly response papers and write a final 20-30 page paper on a topic related to the course.

AS.190.659.  Postcolonial Political Economy.  

There is currently an intermittent and under-examined relationship between postcolonial studies and critical political economy. The aim of this module is to help you to account for this relationship on your own terms. We will examine the entanglements of capitalism and colonialism by building unconventional conversations between classical political economists (as well as their 19th century successors) and thinkers and traditions invested in confronting colonialism and its legacies. We will focus primarily on regions affected by (Anglo) settler colonialism – especially the Americas and the Pacific.

AS.190.660.  Democratic Resilience: US Democracy in Comparative and Historical Perspective.  

What gives democratic regimes the ability to withstand challenges such as extreme polarization, racial and ethnic conflict, rising economic inequality, and institutional sclerosis and avoid the prospect of backsliding toward authoritarianism? This course will examine the problem of democratic resilience by locating the contemporary crisis of American democracy in comparative and historical perspective, bringing together literatures in comparative democratization and American politics.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.666.  Political Economy Of Development.  

Graduate students only.

AS.190.667.  Reconstructing International Relations Theory.  

In this class, we will study IR theory in a reconstructive mode. We will return to foundational texts in light of more recent theoretical developments both in IR and social thought more broadly. Our goal will be to critically assess the basic epistemological, ontological, and historical assumptions of IR theory while charting paths for its possible futures.

AS.190.670.  Capitalism, Marx and the Value-Form.  

This seminar will explore the capitalist value-form (Wertform) by way of a reading of Marx and a number of value-form theorists. Grad students only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.672.  Money.  

What is money? And given its absolute centrality to economics and politics, shouldn’t political economy and political theory hold answers to this question? Instead, the history of both neoclassical economics and modern political thought is marked by eschewals or refusals of it or its importance. This graduate seminar will explore the theory and politics of money, through critical readings of orthodox theories, engagements with heterodox political economy, and encounters with contemporary political theory.

AS.190.675.  Neoliberalism.  

Readings on the history, theory, and politics of neoliberalism, from midcentury to the present.

Writing Intensive

AS.190.676.  Field Survey of International Relations.  

This course provides a scaffold for the study of international relations theory, organized historically and by major approaches. The focus is on close reading and discussion of exemplars of important bodies of theory. Intended for doctoral students with IR as their major or minor field. Graduate students only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.678.  Law and Politics.  

As a field, Law and Politics has evolved from the study of constitutional law and judicial politics to the political behavior of judges and their associates to the study of law and society, the operation of law and courts “on the ground” in the international arena as well as in the United States, historical institutionalism, and the carceral state. In this graduate course, we will review some of the classic texts in the field, with a focus on the tension between legal institutions and democratic politics. In particular, we will examine how that tension is manifest in the foundations of the American political system and in critical reflection on contemporary practices of American democracy. Students will turn in response papers every week on the reading. In addition, there will be two 10-20 page papers due during the semester. Graduate Students Only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.679.  The Political Poetics of Walt Whitman and Henry Thoreau.  

Examination of the works of Thoreau and Whitman with an eye toward how their texts engage in subjectivity-formation and the inducement of publics. What are the powers and limits of their practices of language, including myth-making, affirmations of nonhuman agencies, and nature-writing? Grad students only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.681.  Race and Politics of Punishment in the U.S..  

Contact with criminal justice has become a primary way that many Americans see and experience government, particularly those from race-class subjugated communities. Yet, our field has been slow to appreciate the development of the carceral state or to consider its manifold impacts for citizenship. In this graduate seminar, we will survey key debates around punishment, state violence, and surveillance, with a particular focus on research that takes institutional development, history, and racial orders seriously. Why did the carceral state expand in “fits and starts” and with what consequence for state-building? We explore its (racialized and gendered) relationship to other key systems: foster care, social provision, labor relations and the labor market, and immigration enforcement. A core preoccupation of this course will be to understand the ways in which the criminal justice system “makes race” and how debates about crime and punishment were often debates about black inclusion and equality. How does exposure to criminal justice interventions shape political learning, democratic habits, and racial lifeworlds? In addition to policy, political discourse, and racial politics, we will employ works from a range of fields – history, sociology, law, and criminology – and a range of methods (ethnography, historical analysis, quantitative and qualitative). Required books include: Khalil Muhammad’s Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, Elizabeth Hinton’s From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime, David Oshinsky’s Worse than Slavery: Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice, Bruce Western’s Punishment and Inequality in America, and Michael Fortner’s Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.683.  Research Seminar/Political Parties.  

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.685.  Critical theory, method, and application in International Relations.  

Critical theories are often taught by focusing on their various philosophical and ethical claims. But how do you “apply” critical theories in the study of International Relations? Is “method” only a “mainstream” concern? This course seeks to relate philosophy and ethics to method with a (future) eye to dissertation writing. We will consider e.g. Marxist, feminist, postcolonial, and poststructural lines of inquiry, as well as, at the same time, a range of conceptual areas of inquiry – e.g., the affective, the normative, the poetic, the phenomenological, and the material.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.687.  Philosophy and the Anthropocene.  

How do philosophers such as Heidegger, Whitehead, Deleuze and Braidotti help us to think about the dynamics of the Anthropocene? What do anthropologists and geoscientists such as Anna Tsing, Bruno Latour, Jason Moore, Michael Benton, Jan Zalasiewics and Wally Broecker--teach those philosophies and us about the contemporary condition? Class presentations on assigned readings, seminar paper, and class discussions.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.190.688.  Micro- and Meso-Level Approaches to Political Violence.  

How is violence organized, produced, and understood? This course will introduce graduate students to advanced scholarship on political violence and will encourage students to explore the relationship between violence, agency, and structure. Central themes include: mobilization and recruitment; the emergence and behavior of armed organizations (e.g. militant groups, pro-state militias); ethnic violence; civilian targeting; gender-based violence in war; election violence; and vigilantism. The class will challenge students to critically examine violence as an outcome, political process, and as an indicator of underlying relationships and social structures.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.693.  Planetary Interdependence and World Goverments.  

Intensive exploration of alternative global political architectures for high levels of security, ecological and internet interdependence.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.190.800.  Independent Study.  
AS.190.849.  Graduate Research.  
AS.190.890.  Independent Study.  
AS.190.893.  Political Science Practicum.  
AS.191.102.  Diasporas in World Politics.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the role of diasporas - ethnic, religious, and migrant groups - in world politics. What impact do diaspora communities have on the foreign policy of their country of residence or country of origin? What is the involvement of diaspora communities in civil wars, ethnic conflicts, and conflict resolution? How does this kind of transnationalism affect international order?

AS.191.103.  The Politics of Crime and Punishment.  1 Credit.  

In this class, we will ask questions about the relationship between crime, law, and punishment in modern democratic states. Students will be introduced to dominant modern approaches to understanding punishment and modern state’s power to enforce the law. In light of these theoretical approaches, we will consider the connection between criminalization, punishment, and politics in contemporary United States.

AS.191.104.  Covert Action in International Politics.  3 Credits.  

This course examines covert action from the Second World War up until the present. Covert action is any activity undertaken by a sponsor seeking to influence a target while remaining anonymous. We will be covering some of the more prominent examples of the use of assassinations, coup d’états bribery, blackmail, propaganda, election rigging, cyber-war, and economic sabotage. By the end of this course you should have a solid and detailed empirical knowledge of a large number of covert operations from around the world. You should be familiar with the definitions and categories for covert action and you should be able to engage with debates on the utility of covert action and the ethical and legal issues involved in using covert activities.

Writing Intensive

AS.191.106.  Freshman Seminar: Mass Incarceration and American Politics.  3 Credits.  

This freshman seminar examines how the United States became the world's leading jailer, the impact of mass incarceration on American politics, and the dynamics of reform. Points of emphasis include elections, federalism, and race.

Writing Intensive

AS.191.108.  Introduction to Democratic Theory.  3 Credits.  

Is democracy best understood as a form of government, or as "a way of life" that opposes the inertia and failures of state institutions? What is the difference between representative democracy and participatory democracy? How have political thinkers distinguished between a democracy and a republic? Does democracy require collective identity and if so, is it necessarily exclusionary? This course explores influential answers to these questions, from Rousseau to Martin Luther King, Jr. and beyond.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.119.  Freshman Seminar: Thinking Critically through the Global South.  3 Credits.  

This seminar exposes students to tools for thinking critically about life and politics by introducing them to contemporary debates in International Relations and Political Theory that have been proposed by authors from the Global South. Topics include, but are not limited to: development, postcolonial studies, environment, knowledge production, and gender and sexuality.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.201.  Love in Politics, Politics in Love.  3 Credits.  

In much of political science, political power is assumed to flow from fear. Using classic texts in political theory, this class will consider the existence of a different kind of political power, one flowing from love. The following questions will structure the course: What are the powers and forms of love? Are political bonds and loving bonds related? Class discussions will draw from a variety of sources, including readings by Hobbes, Nygren, Plato, Augustine, Rousseau, Engels, Jordan, and Berlant.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.191.215.  Freshman Seminar: The Politics of Personal Life: Work, Family and Consumption.  3 Credits.  

This course explores various theoretical attempts to broaden the meaning of “politics” by examining three spheres of action typically equated with “personal” life: work, family, and consumption. The following questions orient our inquiry: what does the phrase “the personal is political” mean, and what sort of political solutions does it typically endorse? What can we learn about politics by studying family dynamics? Why do Americans work so much, and how does “work ethic” discourse promote punitive social policies? What is the relationship between our everyday acts of consumption and larger political phenomena such as climate change and racialization processes? What can theories of intersectionality tell us about such dynamics?

AS.191.216.  Freshman Seminar: By Any Means Necessary? Political Theories of Violence.  3 Credits.  

Questions of violence are as old as questions of politics itself. Are politics and violence essentially the same or is politics fundamentally non-violent? Is violence the only way to achieve political change? Has the state been a force for eliminating violence and securing freedom or has it only created more conflict? Who gets to define what counts as violent, and for what purposes? This course engages such questions through a theoretical lens, often focusing on political actors and activists responding on the ground to these pertinent questions. It asks students to reconsider what they normally think violence, non-violence, and politics are. We will particularly investigate this angle through the lens of race and colonialism—reading such figures as Michel Foucault, Franz Fanon, Mao Zedong, Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Angela Davis, and Ida B. Wells—as well as focusing on histories of state formation and state violence.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.191.217.  Freshman Seminar: International Politics from the Global South.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on the interests and preferences of developing countries in international politics. The formal and informal rules of international politics tend to favor the interests and preferences of powerful countries: richer states, with better technologies and superior military capabilities. Sometimes, however, the interests and preferences of great powers do not align with what the rest of the countries want, especially with states in the Global South. We will analyze what developing countries do to restrain the leeway of powerful countries, particularly when their interests and preferences conflict. The course is divided into four main sections: a review of theories about international order and international hierarchies, tools to restrain great powers, review of strategies from countries in Latin America, Africa, and East Asia, and areas of disagreements between the Global North and the Global South.

AS.191.303.  Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal Justice.  3 Credits.  

In this course, students will gain a foundational understanding of critical race theory, including its genesis in legal theory. The course will examine its relationship and importance to social movements, including through key concepts like intersectionality. The course will also use critical race theory to grapple with law, racial segregation, and the criminal justice system in the United States.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.191.304.  Writing Politics in an Age of Crisis.  3 Credits.  

We live in an age of crisis. Social, political, and environmental disruptions both in the United States and around the world are the new normal. How do we – as individuals, citizens, and scholars – come to understand these issues? And how should we write about them? This course is designed to help students improve as writers, readers, and editors for a world where powerful young voices are more necessary than ever. The substantive focus of the course will be on the dynamics of interlinked contemporary political crises and on the responses available to individuals to address them. We will read a variety of scholarly, journalistic, and literary sources to inform our discussion and inspire our writing. However, this course is designed not as a standard seminar, but as a writing workshop. Students will write and critique a variety of pieces of different lengths and styles – including a political memoir, an op-ed, a long-form critical essay, and a piece of speculative fiction - spending the majority of in-class time on peer review, presentations, and writing exercises, which they will compile into a writing portfolio. Reading will include works by Alexander Chee, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Mary Annaise Heglar, Hunter S. Thompson, James Baldwin, Dave Zirin, Elizbeth Rush, Charlotte Shane, and Teju Cole, among many others.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.191.305.  The Politics of Sound.  3 Credits.  

What does politics sound like? Can sounds (sound waves, musical compositions, nonhuman voices, vocal timbres, …) carry or even create political meaning? Listening to such questions, this course explores the role of sonic and musical figures in the political theory canon, the influence of sound on political events, as well as the involvement of the sensing human body and a more-than-human environment in public affairs. To do that, the course (1) introduces the soundscape as a methodological framework for describing politics as an aesthetic experience; (2) addresses sonic ways to conceptualize political matters, such as nationhood, civic resistance, speech, power, identity and warfare; and (3) uses sound to reimagine democratic and ecologically sustainable forms of living-together. The course combines readings in political theory with texts in cultural, sound and media studies. Multimedia resources (popular and classical music pieces, films, sound recordings, …) accompany the theoretical discussions and relate them to contemporary events. Assignments include short presentations, a soundwalk report, and a final paper.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.307.  Democracy and Political Psychology: Ideals and Realities of Democratic Citizenship.  3 Credits.  

This course confronts the expectations of democratic theory regarding the way citizens should think and behave with findings from political psychology with respect to how they do think and behave. Divergences of the ideals and realities of democratic citizenship often seem quite glaring and discomforting. What are the conclusions we should draw from such mismatches? Should we simply accept them or is there something to be done about them? Alternatively, should democracy be redefined or abdicated altogether? The course will center on the experience of the advanced industrial democracies – the places where one would presume democracy to work best. In addition to addressing substantive questions, the course also aims to equip students with approaches, methods, and techniques they can use in conducting their own empirical research.

AS.191.309.  Theory of Conversation.  3 Credits.  

What are the purposes of conversation, and how do we navigate these purposes? How do we excuse, justify, and explain ourselves to one another; how do we forgive each other; how do we come to agree with one another? When do we reach the conclusion that we have nothing more to say, and why? In this course, we will approach these and similar questions through the tradition of ordinary language philosophy as represented by Wittgenstein, Austin, and Cavell. We will then apply the method of ordinary language philosophy to conversations found in the plays of Beckett and Shakespeare, as well as the films of Hawks and McCarey. Students will be expected to write a short paper each week.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.191.311.  Who Are You Laughing At?! Political Theories of Pluralism and Laughter.  3 Credits.  

Laughter in recent years has emerged as a key experience through which diverse political interests, beliefs, and identities form, interact, and compete with one another. From Donald Trump’s claims that China, Mexico, and North Korea "are laughing at us," to the 2015 Charlie Hebdo attacks and the 2010 Jon Stewart rally on the National Mall, the question "who are you laughing at?!" lies at the center of contemporary political struggles. This course puts various philosophical, historical, and literary accounts of laughter into conversation with classic and contemporary theories of pluralism to explore how practices of laughter construct, preserve, and transform barriers of political difference today.

AS.191.313.  Why We Punsih.  3 Credits.  

A multidisciplinary exploration of the justifications and problems associated with punishment broadly defined, including prison sentences, personal acts of revenge, and military reprisals. Course texts will include international court cases, philosophical texts, and classic legal thinkers, in addition to fiction and news articles. Particular attention will be paid to when punishment is (or is not) cruel, deserved, or proportionate; when restraint should be shown; and whether it is desirable to abolish it altogether. Case studies will include the practice of solitary confinement, cycles of retaliatory violence in communal conflicts, the death penalty, and International Criminal Court efforts to punish perpetrators of war crimes and crimes against humanity. Writing intensive.

Writing Intensive

AS.191.315.  The Domestic Politics of Israel.  3 Credits.  

Israel’s politics and history are complex, involving multiple military conflicts, domestic struggles and dynamic international relationships. This course will focus on Israel’s domestic politics by tracing the story of the development of its party system and the parties composing it. A parliamentary democracy with a proportional representation electoral system, Israel’s party system includes multiple parties who represent the various segments of Israeli society. What are the origins of this party system and the parties within it? What changes have they experienced and what are the factors that influence those changes? Who are the important actors and what might be motivating them? How have these parties influenced the development of Israel’s domestic politics? Using both historical and statistical materials, these questions and others will serve as our guide on a journey to a better understanding of Israel’s domestic politics, from its inception to the present day.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.191.317.  No Justice, No Peace: Perspectives from Post-conflict Responses.  3 Credits.  

The slogan "No Justice, No Peace" has been uttered both as a call to arms for social unrest and as a warning that a lack of perceived justice in a society will mean lack of peace. While the demand is made in a variety of contexts ranging from urban protests in response to racial injustices to states in the aftermath of protracted civil strife or state sponsored violence, a discussion of the kind of justice that is demanded with the slogan or the kind of peace that is foreseen is often missing from the public invocations of ‘no justice, no peace.’This course aims to examine invocations of “no justice, no peace” and mechanisms employed to respond to its demands. As such, the course readings will explore conceptions of justice and peace envisioned in a variety of post-conflict contexts. Students will be encouraged to evaluate and question the conceptions of justice and peace and the shifts in their meanings overtime through an examination of primary sources such as U.N. resolutions, Security Council Meeting Notes, UNCHR reports, international NGO reports, international tribunal reports in addition to seminal texts on the concepts of justice, peace and reconciliation. Students will be encouraged to articulate the ways in which response mechanisms delivered or failed to deliver the promises of justice, peace and fugitive reconciliation.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.325.  Environmental Social Sciences meet Environmental Fiction.  3 Credits.  

The course pairs readings of critical texts addressing environmental crises with literary fiction broadly dealing with the relationship between the human and the environment. We discuss the ways narratives affect our understanding of complex global phenomena, and how the tools of literary analysis can help us unpack the rhetorics and values of both fictional and nonfictional texts.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.191.335.  Arab-Israeli Conflict.  3 Credits.  

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.340.  Cities, Space & Power.  3 Credits.  

Gentrify! 80% of people live in urban areas. These locations are key for solving political dilemmas, including climate change, class, segregation, gender & immigration. This class explores all of these through the lens of gentrification. What does 20th century urban planning have to do with it? How can I talk to my friends about gentrification in Baltimore? Find out this and more!

AS.191.344.  Belonging to Nature in the Anthropocene.  3 Credits.  

This course explores debates in contemporary environmental political thought concerning humanity's relationship to nature in the Anthropocene. The Anthropocene refers to the era in which "human" activity becomes a force of "nature"–when the impact of human activity on natural processes manifests itself in the stuff of the Earth. For many of us, these planetary transformations are hardly noticeable in day-to-day life, but they are dramatic: we are living through the Earth's sixth mass extinction. What is our relationship to these transformations? Do we have the power to stop them, or at least to minimize their harmful effects? Course readings and films introduce multiple visions of the human/nature relationship and examine the responses they recommend to these and other questions. The political stakes of these visions are brought to light as we consider: How do visions of the human/nature relationship shape and texture core political concepts like freedom, agency, responsibility, and progress? What do they suggest about the strategies most likely to motivate action amid the uncertainty of the Anthropocene? How do these visions subtly (and not so subtly) relegate some to the realm of "nature" so that others can be classified as "human"?

Writing Intensive

AS.191.345.  Russian Foreign Policy.  3 Credits.  

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.347.  The Political Economy of Climate Change.  3 Credits.  

Scientists tell us that continued reliance on fossil fuels to drive our economies causes global warming, which in turn poses an existential threat to humanity as we know it. But the major tools of societies to steer a clean energy transition—climate and energy policies—often fail, lack ambition, and vary widely from country to country. This is puzzling: Why is it so difficult to pass meaningful policies even though the stakes are so high? How to explain the varying responses to the same problem? In this course, students study the struggle over energy and climate policies through case studies of large industrialized countries. Besides other things, we will ask why the US failed to install any kind of meaningful climate policy, if and how the problems of the EU’s carbon market can be solved, why China cancelled over 100 coal-fired power plants in 2017, and why cloudy Germany became a solar energy powerhouse.

Writing Intensive

AS.191.354.  Congress and Foreign Policy.  3 Credits.  

This course is an introduction to the Congressional role in foreign policy. The Constitution grants the President the authority to conduct foreign policy. Yet it also gives Congress a substantial role in the shaping of foreign policy. The distinct roles are not always clear, creating an inherent tension between these two branches of government and efforts on each side to increase their power. This class will address the “rules of the road” in conducting American foreign policy and how they change. The class will go beyond theory to include case studies that show the tension between Congress and the Administration – including the Iran Agreement, Climate Change, the use of sanctions and American policy towards Cuba. The course will include guest lecturers who work in Congress on the various aspects of foreign policy – including appropriations, intelligence, oversight and investigations. We will address the Congressional role in ratification of treaties and in declaring war. The class will consider the different ways that each branch of government approaches human rights, arms sales and sanctions. The class will also address the domestic political aspects of foreign policy – including the role of advocacy groups and special interests and the political use of Congressional investigations. Most of these classes will be in Washington, DC to facilitate guest speakers. Several classes will meet at the US Congress.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.359.  North Korea, Identity, and International Politics.  3 Credits.  

This course analyzes the role of identity and foreign policy in contemporary North Korea. We begin with an overview of North Korea's political economic development and the role of national identity in state formation. We will then use those concepts to explore North Korea's relations with South Korea, China, and the United States through topics such as regime security, nuclear weapons, human rights, and social change. The course ties together academic literature, journalistic sources, and policy research with in-class activities and writing assignments. It is recommended that students have taken a survey course on International Relations (e.g., Global Security Politics, Contemporary International Politics).

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.362.  Covert Action in International Relation.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces the use of covert action in relations between states. We will cover various cases with different sponsoring and targeted countries and from different time periods. The class ends with a review of the latest Russian covert activity against the United States.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.363.  Populism and Politics.  3 Credits.  

Around the world, from Italy to Brazil, and from Hungary to the United States, populist candidates are fundamentally changing the political landscape. In this course, we explore the nature of populism; investigate whether populism poses an existential threat to liberal democracy; explore the causes of the populist rise; investigate the ways in which populism is a response to demographic change; and discuss what strategies might allow non-populist political actors to push back.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.365.  U.S Constitutional Law - Civil Liberities.  3 Credits.  

The course is designed to introduce students to the study of civil liberties as protected by the Constitution of the United States. The emphasis will be upon those rights incorporated into the Bill of Rights and made applicable to the states through the Fourteenth Amendment. Specifically, the course will examine freedom of speech and freedom of the press – as well as freedom of freedom of thought, belief, and association. In addition, the course will address the right to privacy, the rights of those accused of crimes, and the rights and protections secured under the two clauses of the First Amendment relating to religious liberty – the Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.191.372.  Making Social Change.  1.5 Credits.  

Aitchison Students Only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.375.  Thinking Organizationally about Politics.  3 Credits.  

Aitchison Students Only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.376.  Public Policy Writing.  3 Credits.  

Aitchison Students Only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.191.379.  Thinking Strategically.  1.5 Credits.  

Aitchison Students Only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.381.  Education Policy.  1.5 Credits.  

Aitchison Students only

AS.191.382.  Thinking Economically.  3 Credits.  

Aitchison Students Only.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.383.  Visualizing Data.  3 Credits.  

Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences

AS.191.389.  The Politics of Race and Ethnicity in the Postcolonial Society.  3 Credits.  

The postcolonial society offers a unique terrain for the study of comparative racial politics, providing a setting for which racial and ethnic politics often take place between predominately non-white groups. In this course, students will examine contemporary understandings of the concepts of race and ethnicity and how they are deployed politically in the postcolonial society, enabling students to make deeper explications about the relationship between race, ethnicity and national inclusion as global phenomena that are the persistent and widespread legacies of colonialism, nationalism and white supremacy. Specifically, students will become familiar with the processes of colonization and decolonization--as well as postcolonial theories of resistance--that structure group politics today, drawing upon theoretical sources from Africa, Asia and the Caribbean. These theoretical and historical tools will be used to study racial and ethnic politics across a range of postcolonial cases, including Indonesia, Mauritius, Fiji, Trinidad, Colombia and Brazil.

Writing Intensive

AS.191.402.  Numbers, Pictures, Politics.  3 Credits.  

Aitchison students only.

Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.191.405.  Modernity and the Slaughterhouse: Labor, Violence, and Animals in Contemporary Society.  3 Credits.  

Steven Pinker opens his influential bestseller The Better Angels of Our Nature with the claim that “If the past is a foreign country, it is a shockingly violent one,” going on to argue that the contemporary age is one marked by relatively more peace and less violence than ever before. Drawing on a long tradition of optimist thinkers, he credits this civilizational progress to a combination of the intellectual legacy of Enlightenment humanism, greater faith in scientific rationality and technological progress, a strong system of states and social institutions, and the development of democracy and the liberal market economy. For Pinker, this account holds as much for humans as it does for animals, and he goes so far as to claim the emergence of animal rights as “another rights revolution” akin to civil rights and women’s rights. But does this account of modern society hold up under scrutiny? Or, more specifically, where does it fail? And how exactly does contemporary society relate to different forms of violence (against humans and animals) that it has not done away with?The historical processes described by Pinker have not only drastically changed human society, but they have also impacted how we interact with animals. The United States today produces and consumes more meat than ever, but most Americans live at an increasing geographic and perceptual distance from animals and the humans who work with them, relying on a system of industrial production and a complex division of labor. This course approaches the politics of this distribution of labor, violence, and human-animal relations from a site rarely considered in political analysis: the modern slaughterhouse. It engages with this institution as a historical and cultural object, using the story of its emergence and operation to ask broader questions about the politics of social change. We will draw on an interdisciplinary range of academic and non-academic works to explore a range of questions about the relationships between institutions and rationality, visibility and invisibility, hygiene and marginalization, and labor and society, and to examine the narratives ostensibly peaceful, liberal democracies tell themselves about violence, history, and progress

Writing Intensive

AS.191.406.  Capitalism: Politics and Political Thought in a Market Economy.  3 Credits.  

The United States is a capitalist economy and we live in a capitalist world. This a fact we take for granted and therefore spend little time examining. Capitalism’ proponents attribute our society’s unprecedented wealth and technological advances to this economic system. Some go so far as to claim that modern democracy and social progress are impossible without a capitalist economy. Critics point to growing social inequality and a slew of environmental ills as proof of capitalism’s unsustainability. Some suggest that capitalism is antithetical to true democracy and human flourishing. But what exactly is capitalism? How did it evolve in the USA and how does the form capitalism takes in the United States differ from the forms it takes elsewhere? And, crucially, how is capitalism shaped by – and how does it shape – contemporary politics? And how exactly is this all related to liberalism, conservatism, neoliberalism, libertarianism, socialism, and democratic socialism? This seminar is designed to help students critically approach these questions.Rather than taking simplistic pro-contra approach, this seminar will examine capitalism along four axes: as a political-economic system, a corollary set of structures and institutions, the force behind a specific form of state organization, and the determinant of how society and individuals act and see themselves. To explore these issues, we will focus on a number of contemporary political issues, with a primary geographic focus on the United States, including the following: the debates over the welfare state and socialized healthcare; unions, lobbies, and special interests; the connection between capitalism, culture, and ideology; the effects of a capitalist organization of labor of questions of race, gender, and citizenship; the commodification of the environment and other species; and the process of critique, resistance, and social change in a capitalist system. Throughout, we will discuss the theoretical and empirical arguments put forward by a historically and disciplinarily broad range of thinkers including Karl Marx, Simone Weil, John Locke, Adam Smith, Robert Nozick, Thomas Sewell, Nancy Fraser, David Graeber, Melinda Cooper, Andreas Malm, and Guy Debord, through to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Elon Musk.

Writing Intensive

AS.191.415.  Fear and Loathing: Writing About Contemporary American Politics.  3 Credits.  

This course is focused on reading, analyzing, and, most importantly, producing writing about the American political experience and contemporary events in American politics. We will use scholarly, print, and new media sources from different sides of the political spectrum, drawing on political and literary theory to inform our discussions. We will then try to do better: Students will write and workshop a variety of pieces of different lengths and styles, spending in-class time on peer critique, presentations, and writing exercises, which they will compile into a writing portfolio. We will discuss and write op-eds, memoirs, long-form book reviews, commentary essays, and satire. Throughout, we will devote considerable class time to critique and discussion of students’ writing. Readings will include works by James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Claudia Rankine, Hunter S. Thompson, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Alexander Chee, Angela Nagle, and Omar el Akkad. We will draw on political commentary from sources ranging from The Washington Post to Jacobin to The Onion, through to Facebook and Twitter. Throughout, we will consider a wide range of topics pertinent to writing about politics, including questions of the make-up of the public sphere and diverse audiences, the use of voice and language, the deployment of facts and rhetoric, the place of fiction and humor in political critique, and the rise of fake news and trolling.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.191.420.  Are We Living In an Age of Collapse?.  3 Credits.  

This course will investigate the themes of civilizational crisis and collapse with the primary goal of understanding the “perfect storm” of converging crises confronting humanity in the 21st century, including earth system, economic, food and energy crises. While these crises are often studied in isolation from each other, this course will engage with more holistic approaches to study them as interrelated components of a deeper system-wide crisis in the contemporary world order. The first part will explore theories of world-systems, political ecology, and collapse in historical perspective. The second will focus on specific dimensions of the contemporary global crisis and their relations, in particular the earth system crisis, the global economic crisis, food and energy crises. The third part will then explore the implications of these crises for the future of world order by investigating possible scenarios, both for the world-system as a whole and for the United States in particular, and then by evaluating different responses and proposed solutions to our critical civilizational condition.