SA.553.100.  New China Course.  4 Credits.  
SA.553.101.  Advanced Topics in Chinese Foreign Policy: China at the Borders.  4 Credits.  

Examines China’s relations with the countries along its territorial and maritime periphery, which form a core dimension of Chinese foreign and security policy. China’s neighbors have interests that do not always align with China’s preferences, some involving fundamental disagreements over territorial rights, resources, and political values. The way in which China manages its relationships also has implications for its broader global goals and how China sees itself as a nation-state. This course also gives close attention to how China manages its physical borders, including through provincial and sub-provincial institutions.

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.750.749[C]

SA.553.102.  China and International Law.  4 Credits.  

Over the past thirty years, China has gone from being one of the most isolated countries in the world to a major player in international affairs. Yet despite its growing power and influence, it maintains an ambivalent attitude towards international law and the liberal international order. This class will explore that ambivalence, and will in particular examine how China might adapt to the existing world order and the ways in which China will look to influence its evolution. The class will cover China’s approach to international peace and security, China’s membership in the WTO, Beijing’s engagement with the international human rights regime, and the South China Sea dispute, among other topics.

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.750.602[C]

SA.553.103.  China's Political Economy in Transition.  4 Credits.  

This course examines the political and institutional foundations sustaining contemporary China’s economic growth and reforms, as well as the consequences of its transition. The course focuses on several paradoxes. How does China push for market-oriented reforms without democratizing the authoritarian political system? Is the state still in control in today’s economy? How does China reconcile the communist party ideology with its fast-growing private sector, and with elements of capitalism? How does the state balance the centralization and decentralization of economic policy making and implementation? What is the rationale and the consequences of China’s internationalization? How does the US-China tech war influence China and its position in the global value chain? Can the “China model” work in other contexts? We will examine these important questions through a combination of conceptual frameworks, real world examples, and policy analysis.

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.750.740[C]

SA.553.104.  Chinese Foreign Policy.  4 Credits.  

This course analyzes the evolution of the People’s Republic of China’s foreign policy. It deals with China’s objectives, institutions, instruments of policy, changing alignments, and growing role in the international system, directing considerable attention to specific policy issues and the policy process.

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.750.702[C]

SA.553.105.  Contemporary Chinese Politics.  4 Credits.  

Analyzes the domestic politics of the People’s Republic of China, with particular emphasis on the reform era. This introductory course covers political history, policy process and institutional issues, leadership and the challenge of socioeconomic modernization. Focuses on recurrent and substantive policy issues in Chinese politics.

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.750.228[C]

SA.553.106.  Leadership in China.  4 Credits.  

This course is a broad survey of what leadership looks like in China. The main through-line of the course is the iterative and evolving dynamics between incentives/constraints and agency. We will explore the state as the playing field where these dynamics are played out, over time (to explore continuity and change) and across space (to explore adaptation and innovation). The course does not presume prior knowledge of China or Chinese language, but students new to the study of China are encouraged to pay special attention to the cumulative nature of the course and invest in the readings, particularly in the first four weeks. Although some of the themes of this course may minimally overlap with/reinforce other courses offered at SAIS, the approach to this class will be significantly different.

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.750.752[C]

SA.553.107.  The Turbulent Triangle: Taiwan, China and the United States.  4 Credits.  

Examines how Taiwan has developed into an economic powerhouse and an open, stable society but also presents one of the thorniest issues in China-U.S. relations. Considers Taiwan’s unique international status and its complex sense of identity. Examines the roots of ongoing tensions between Mainland China and Taiwan and the U.S. and how Taiwan, despite its achievements, threatens to become once again a flashpoint.

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.750.729[C]