AS.100.102.  The Medieval World.  3 Credits.  

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.103.  Early Modern Europe & the Wider World.  3 Credits.  

This course surveys the history of Europe and its interactions with Africa, the Americas, and Asia during the early modern period (c. 1400-1800). Topics include: the Renaissance, the Reformation, International Relations and Warfare, Colonialism, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Revolutions.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.104.  Modern Europe and the Wider World.  3 Credits.  

The Modern European World familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have formed European History since the Revolutionary era.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.108.  Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896.  3 Credits.  

From slave revolts on the West African coast to national conventions and civil war, people of African descent have defined freedom and struggle in terms of kinship, diasporic connection, and fighting antiblack violence. This course explores the arc of that history and its role in the making of America.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.112.  Making America: Mastery & Freedom, 1609-1789.  3 Credits.  

Early America from the arrival of Europeans to the US constitution. Covers transatlantic empires and their rivalries; formation of Anglo-American settler societies based on slavery and patriarchal households; conflict with Native Americans; the revolutionary era and its tensions between republican principles of freedom and independence and persisting, even deepening, gender and racial inequalities.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.113.  Making America: Race, Radicalism, and Reform.  3 Credits.  

This course examines race and social movements in America from the Revolution to 1921.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.115.  Modern Latin America.  3 Credits.  

From Simón Bolivar to the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo to the Zapatistas, this course asks what it means to be Latin American through the lenses of state formation, artistic expression, and international relations.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.117.  History of Brazil.  3 Credits.  

An introductory survey of Brazilian History, 1500-2017.

Area: Humanities

AS.100.122.  Introduction to History of Africa (since 1880).  3 Credits.  

An introduction to the African past. First term: to 1880. Second term: to since 1880. Cross-listed with Africana Studies.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.123.  Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to African history with emphasis on diversity, mobility, and innovation. Considers both early and modern times.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.129.  Introduction to Modern Jewish History.  3 Credits.  

Jewish history 1750-present in Europe, the Near East, the US, Israel; the challenges of modernity and new forms of Jewish life and conflict from Enlightenment and emancipation, Hasidism, Reform and Orthodox Judaism to capitalism and socialism; empire, nationalism and Zionism; the Holocaust. Extensive attention to US Jewry and State of Israel.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.130.  Freshman Seminar.  3 Credits.  

Freshman Seminar course. Topics vary by term.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.135.  Freshman Seminar: In the Land of Others: Minorities in the Pre-Modern Mediterranean.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the history of ethno-religious minorities in the Mediterranean during the Later Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.140.  Freshman Seminar: Displacement: A History of U.S. Cities from Urban Renewal to Gentrification.  3 Credits.  

“Displacement” explores historical conflicts over urban planning, clearance, and redevelopment. Students will conduct archival research and contribute to an online exhibit that develops the histories of displaced Baltimore neighborhoods.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.154.  Modern Mexico from the Alamo to El Chapo.  3 Credits.  

In this course we will use popular depictions of Mexico’s heroes and villains, tragedies and triumphs to delve into both the nation’s history and the importance of thinking historically.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.163.  Modern European History Through Film, 1789 to 1991.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the history of Western Europe from the French Revolution through to the end of the Cold War. It examines such themes as revolutions and democratization, the origins of egalitarianism, the spread of secularism, the post-war reshaping and modernization of Western culture and political policies (European and otherwise), Europe's role in the fall of the Ottoman Empire, and decolonization. Films depicting key periods and events will be used to complement readings.

Area: Humanities

AS.100.170.  Chinese Cultural Revolution.  3 Credits.  

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. (Previously offered as AS.100.219 and AS.100.236. )

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.180.  Themes and Concepts in Jewish History.  3 Credits.  

The course will introduce the student to the main themes and debates in Jewish historiography.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.193.  Undergraduate Seminar In History.  3 Credits.  

The first semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Following a survey of approaches to the study of the past and an introduction to research methods, students undertake original research and write an extended essay. Intended for history majors and prospective majors.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.194.  Undergraduate Seminar in History.  3 Credits.  

The second semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course further introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Students write an essay based on original research.

Prerequisite(s): AS.100.193

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.202.  Conflict and Co-Existence: The Early Modern Mediterranean.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the dynamic and fluid world of the early modern Mediterranean (1453-1650), where Christians, Jews, and Muslims met, fought, traded with, and enslaved each other.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.216.  Reformation and Counter Reformation Europe.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the series of religious and political conflicts that make up what are known now as the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.230.  Bones, Blood, and Ecstasy: Religious Culture in Western Christendom, 1100-1700.  3 Credits.  

Explores religious culture in medieval and early modern Europe, with an emphasis on spiritual beliefs and practices, relics, miracles, pilgrimage, and saint-making. Emphasis on reading and discussing written sources and visual culture.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.232.  American Dreams: The Middle Class in U.S. History.  3 Credits.  

Why does so much of America consider itself middle class? And how did we get that way? “American Dreams” traces that history from 19th century elites to 20th century suburbia.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.233.  History of Modern Germany.  3 Credits.  

There is more to Germany than beer, BMWs, and Bayern Munich. We explore politics, culture, economics and society to understand Germany and its role within Europe from the 18th century to the ‘Refugee Crisis’ and immigration today.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.234.  The Making of the Muslim Middle East, 600-1100 A.D..  3 Credits.  

A survey of the major historical transformations of the region we now call the 'Middle East' (from late antiquity through the 11th century) in relation to the formation and development of Islam and various Muslim empires.Cross-listed with Near Eastern Studies and the Program in Islamic Studies.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.238.  Expansion and the Early U.S. Republic.  3 Credits.  

This course will introduce students to some major issues and problems in the history of the Early U.S. Republic, c. 1750 to 1815, by focusing on the theme of “expansion.”

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.241.  American Revolution.  3 Credits.  

This course provides an intensive introduction to the causes, character, and consequences of the American Revolution, the colonial rebellion that produced the first republic in the Americas, and set in motion an age of democratic revolutions in the Atlantic world. A remarkable epoch in world history, the revolutionary era was of momentous significance.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.242.  Pop History from King Arthur to Game of Thrones.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the use of history for cultural & political purposes in the Anglo-American world from 1500-today. Students will examine how real and imaginary histories have functioned as political propaganda, catalysts of national identity, and weapons in culture wars. The course draws on a range of media, including text, YouTube, video games, podcasts, and movies.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.243.  China: Neolithic to Song.  3 Credits.  

This class offers a broad overview of changes in China from Neolithic times through the Song Dynasty (roughly from 5000 BCE through the 13th century CE) and will include discussion of art, material culture, and literature as well as politics and society. Close readings of primary sources in discussion sections and extensive use of visual material in lectures will help students gain firsthand perspective on the materials covered. Not open to students who have previously taken AS.100.208. Cross listed with East Asian Studies

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.244.  The Power and Politics of Clothing in American History.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the power of clothing and the politicization of appearances at moments of deep political and social unrest in American history (18th-20th centuries).

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.248.  Japan in the World.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to Japan’s history from 1700 to the present, with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas, goods, and people in early modern and modern times. Topics include samurai, nation-building, gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and contemporary popular culture.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.249.  From Darwin to Babar: Animals and Humans in Historical Perspective.  3 Credits.  

This course explores perspectives on the animal/human boundary from the eighteenth century through today. Topics will include biological classification, mosquito-borne diseases, animal rights movements, evolutionary theory, colonialism, Nazism, and conservation.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.252.  Invisible Borders: Exchanges and Migrations in the Modern Mediterranean.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the patterns of movement formed and transgressed by empire, trade, sex tourism, cultural exchange, war, and nationalism, starting from the nineteenth century to the present-day refugee crisis.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.256.  Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750-2012.  3 Credits.  

This course examines topics such as the 'medical model' of prostitution regulation, the rise of international anti-prostitution, and the responses of modern nationalists to sex work in a global context.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.257.  From Voice to Parchment: Media and Communication before the Printing Press, 800-1440.  3 Credits.  

Epic traditions, call to Crusade, public curses, music of the troubadours: this course examines oral tradition and music—the "viral media" of pre-modern Europe—while tracing the impact of new recording technologies: early musical notation, manuscripts, and book production.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.258.  Theorizing Marriage in the United States: Historical and Present Considerations.  3 Credits.  

This course provides a historical and theoretical overview regarding thinking about marriage. Students will think critically about how matrimony has changed over time, and marriage in contemporary culture.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.260.  Boom, Bust, and the Rise of Financial Capitalism in America, 1700-1900.  3 Credits.  

This course explores how legal, social, and political contestation shaped the development of American financial capitalism. The course also focuses on how financial crises precipitated change throughout American history.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.265.  The Medieval City.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on the development and growth of medieval cities in western Europe. Students will explore the various functions of cities, uses of urban space, and challenges they faced.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.268.  Jewish and Christian mysticism in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period.  3 Credits.  

This course will trace the historical development of Jewish and Christian mysticism between the 12th and the 17th centuries.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.270.  Europe since 1945.  3 Credits.  

In this class we focus on such topics as the transatlantic alliance, the Cold War divide, the arms race, détente, migration, European integration and the EU from the end of World War II until today. We will discuss academic literature, movies, documentary films, textual and visual primary sources, and more.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.272.  Online: Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750 to Present.  3 Credits.  

This course examines topics such as the 'medical model' of prostitution regulation, the rise of international anti-prostitution, and the responses of modern nationalists to sex work in a global context. *This course will view films complementary to the subject but it is not considered a Film Studies course. Therefore, montages and mise-en-scene will not be discussed.

Area: Humanities

AS.100.273.  A Comparative History of Jewish and Christian Mysticism.  3 Credits.  

This course will trace the historical development of Jewish and Christian mysticism between the 11th and the 19th centuries.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.282.  Race & Power in Modern South Africa.  3 Credits.  

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.283.  Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-Present.  3 Credits.  

Making and unmaking queer histories introduces students to some of the major themes and historical developments which shape contemporary understandings of past queer lives and communities in the United States and Western Europe since the nineteenth century.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.291.  Medicine in an Age of Empires, 1500-1800.  3 Credits.  

How did medicine emerge as a distinctive body of knowledge and a profession in the early modern period? The answers lie in the histories of disease, empire, and global commerce.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.292.  Radical Spain: Social Movements from the Spanish Empire to the Catalan Crisis.  3 Credits.  

This course examines different radical movements such as anarchism, facism, nationalism and feminism in the context of Spanish history from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first century.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.293.  Undergraduate Seminar in History.  3 Credits.  

The first semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Following a survey of approaches to the study of the past and an introduction to research methods, students undertake original research and write an extended essay. Intended for history majors and prospective majors.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.294.  Undergraduate Seminar in History.  3 Credits.  

The second semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course further introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Students write an essay based on original research.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.295.  American Intellectual History since the Civil War.  3 Credits.  

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.301.  America after the Civil Rights Movement.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the history of late twentieth-century America by examining the social, economic, and political legacies of 1960s civil rights protest for the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s.

Area: Humanities

Writing Intensive

AS.100.303.  Old Regime and Revolutionary France.  3 Credits.  

Examines the history of France from the reign of Louis XIV to the French Revolution, focusing on early modern society, popular culture, absolutism, the Enlightenment, overseas empire, and the French and Haitian Revolutions.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.304.  Myth and History in Medieval Europe.  3 Credits.  

Can a myth be history? This class examines how medieval historians used myths to shape, debate, and even forge their past, and how they redefined history writing in the process.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.305.  Peter to Putin: Survey.  3 Credits.  

Seminar on modern Russia. No midterm and no final. 6 short weekly journals, two short papers, and two small quizzes.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.306.  America and the Great War, 1898-1920.  3 Credits.  

This small, discussion-oriented course covers the period from the Spanish-American War through the end of WWI and the Red Scare that more or less ended in 1920.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.308.  Introduction to the History of Jewish Mysticism.  3 Credits.  

The course will familiarize the student with the history of the main phenomena of Jewish mysticism from the ancient times to the present.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.310.  The French Revolution.  3 Credits.  

Political, social and cultural history of one of the great turning-points in European history. Previously offered as AS.100.204.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.312.  The Transatlantic Slave Trade, c. 1450-1850.  3 Credits.  

The course explores the origins, organization and abolition of the trans-Atlantic slave trade c. 1450-1850. It delves into the historiographical debates over the impact of the trade on the development of Africa, Europe and the Americas in the early modern period.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.316.  American Foreign Policy in the Age of Human Rights.  3 Credits.  

American Foreign Policy in the Age of Human Rights examines competing narratives about the origins of modern international human rights, and explores how those narratives historically informed American foreign policy from the American Revolution up to the present, with an emphasis on the twentieth century.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.318.  The Rise and the Fall of the Modern City: An Environmental History Perspective.  3 Credits.  

This course explores how environmental history analyzes the transformations of cities in the West from 1750 to the early 2000s. An emphasis will be placed on historiographical debates and concepts, but also on agency and relations of power. The course also analyze how the environment is a construct, a production of discourses, representations, and debates.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.320.  Writing U.S. Empire.  3 Credits.  

Attends to the composition and interpretive problems raised by studying the history of American imperialism, 1880s-1930s.

Writing Intensive

AS.100.322.  The Domestic Slave Trade in Antebellum America.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to the domestic slave trade of the 19th century United States. Topics will include the scale of the trade, its impact on enslaved families and redistributive justice/reparations.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.323.  America in the 1960s.  3 Credits.  

The years between 1959, when the course begins, and 1971, when it ends, were tumultuous and divisive. This course explores the political, racial, and cultural struggles of a half century ago.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.325.  Images of War in the 19th and 20th Centuries.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the changing face of war in photographs, propaganda posters, comics, and film from the American Civil War to the "war on terror."

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.326.  From Blood Feud to Black Death: European Society in the High Middle Ages, 1000-1400.  3 Credits.  

Explores the development of society and institutions in the medieval west including kingship and law, religion and difference, gender and ideology. Looks closely at social responses to change and adversity.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.327.  Gender and Sexuality in Reformation and Counter-Reformation Europe.  3 Credits.  

This course will discuss the centrality of gender, sexuality, and gendered rhetoric to the genesis and development of the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation in Europe.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.328.  Caged America: Policing, Confinement, and Criminality in the "Land of the Free".  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on the evolution of law enforcement practices, the history of federal and state prison systems, and the ways in which Americans have understood and reacted to crime.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.329.  Russian Imagination in Three Revolutions.  3 Credits.  

Russian Literature and the arts in Revolutions of 1905, 1917, and Stalin era to 1941. Req: 6 journals of 350 words, 2 papers 1250, 2 quizzes. No midterm or final.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.330.  National Identity in 20th Century China & Japan.  3 Credits.  

Using primary sources, including literature and film, we will explore the changing ways in which ideologues, intellectuals, and ordinary citizens defined national identity in 20th century China and Japan.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.331.  Reading through Things: Early Modern Chinese Medicine, Technology, and Art.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces the history of late imperial China from the perspective of medicine, technology, and the arts.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.332.  Persecution and Toleration in Early Modern Europe.  3 Credits.  

Explores hostilities and fears provoked by religious diversity and deviance from orthodoxy in early modern Europe. Outlines theories, practices, and limits of early modern religious tolerance and intolerance.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.333.  Making Money in the Atlantic World.  3 Credits.  

The history of money is a history of power exercised by states, institutions, and individuals. It is also a history of the structural possibilities and constraints faced by people in the past. We will address making, using, and conceptualizing money in the early modern Atlantic World, a time and a place of expanding empires, extractive enterprises, and changing categories of difference like race, gender, and class.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.334.  Billie Holiday and American Culture.  3 Credits.  

A course examining introducing students to the life, times and music of Billie Holiday. We will read biographies, autobiographies, novels, and listen to music.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.335.  The American West.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the expansion and creation of an American West—and its inhabitants—from the Constitution to the end of the nineteenth century.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.336.  The United Kingdom? A Cultural History of Four Nations, 1707-Present.  3 Credits.  

This course delves into the variegated, often divergent national politics, social landscapes, and cultural shifts in England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland since Britain’s Acts of Union in 1707.

Prerequisite(s): AS.100.101 OR AS.100.102 OR AS.100.103[OR AS.100.104

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.338.  Displacement: A History of U.S. Cities from Urban Renewal to Gentrification.  3 Credits.  

This course explores historical conflicts over urban planning and public health. Working with the Baltimore City Archives, we will piece together histories of Baltimore residents displaced by urban renewal and the social contexts in which they lived. Tours of Baltimore will consider whether recent strategies have addressed the legacies of racism and classism in urban development.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.341.  Historical Performance in the Age of the Troubadours and Trouvères.  3 Credits.  

This seminar examines the practices of musical and theatrical performance in the era of the trouvères and troubadours, “the long thirteenth century.” We look at the context in which trouvère song was composed, performed, and transmitted in manuscript form. Students will also sing trouvère music, and while a knowledge of musical notation is not strictly necessary, it is helpful.The culmination of the course will be a concert and recording session. A final paper based on primary sources about an aspect of medieval performance is required.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.346.  Soviet-American Cold War.  3 Credits.  

The focus will be on Soviet-American interactions, Cold-War Cultures, and the impact on both societies.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.347.  Early Modern China.  3 Credits.  

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.348.  20th-Century China.  3 Credits.  

A survey of the history of China from the late Qing era to the early People’s Republic.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.349.  Entertaining America: Popular Culture from Blackface to Broadcast.  3 Credits.  

"Entertaining America” will trace the history of popular culture in the United States, starting inthe 1830s, when blackface minstrelsy initiated a new wave of commercial performance, andending in the 1920s, when records, films, and radio ushered in the era of mass culture.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.350.  Capital before Capitalism: Economic Debates in the British Empire, 1600-1800.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the events, ideas, and debates that shaped economic thought in early modern Britain and its empire before the advent of Capitalism.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.352.  Age Of Pasternak.  3 Credits.  

This course concerns Russian literature and the arts, including ballet, from the 1910s to the 1950s. Two short papers, journals, two quizzes, and no midterm or final.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.353.  Youth and Youth Movements during 20th Century: Germany, Britain, and the U.S.  3 Credits.  

Through texts, music, and films, this course examines the rise of "youth" as a social and cultural category in a variety of forms, ranging from spontaneous (such as Rock'n'Roll and Techno) to state-organized (Hitler Youth).

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.354.  Playing in the White: Black Writers, the Literary Colorline and Writing Whiteness.  3 Credits.  

This course will turn to known and not-so-known black writers during the early to mid-twentieth century who defied literary expectation and wrote stories that featured or focused on whiteness. We will consider what whiteness offered black writers and the political work that their literary experimentations did for a white American publishing industry.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.355.  Sex and Society in Early Modern Europe.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine how early modern views on the body, gender, and sexuality shaped beliefs about the abilities and rights of women and men.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.356.  W.E.B. Du Bois and the Problem of the Color-Line.  3 Credits.  

This seminar will introduce students to the ideas and legacy of the renowned American scholar, journalist, and activist, W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1963), asking students to locate Du Bois in his historical context and in our own. Through readings and discussions of his key works in various forms, we will assess Du Bois’s impact on major debates in American politics, African-American affairs, and academic disciplines like sociology and history. We will track changes in Du Bois's thinking over time, including in his views of racism, class, gender, liberalism, radicalism, imperialism, and war. Finally, we will consider the ways in which Du Bois's work continues to shape our understanding of these issues and debates in contemporary American society.

Area: Humanities

AS.100.357.  Panic and Liberation: The Politics of Sex in 20th Century Europe.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the 20th century history of sexual attitudes, desires, behaviors, identities, communities, and movements in Western Europe (most notably, Germany, France, and the United Kingdom).

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.358.  Black Code Studies: Black History and Digital Media.  3 Credits.  

This course explores doing histories of people of African descent in an age of digital and social media. The focus will be on African-descended communities in the United States, but content will range across time space. Examples include: West African digital art communities; the use of slave trade databases to write Caribbean history; and the use of social media in social justice organizing from Paris to Baltimore. Students will explore questions of blackness, race, ethnicity, sex and sexuality, violence and justice while creating digital content using platforms like Wordpress, Omeka, Twitter, and Tumblr. Students will be evaluated on their acquisition of African American and Afro-Diasporic history; their knowledge of digital and social media platforms; and their ability to creatively and accurately relate the histories of blackness and black people to their representation and discussion online.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.359.  Gender, Patriarchy, and the English Revolution.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the varied experiences of gender and gender roles in seventeenth-century Britain and analyzes how these roles were challenged, changed, and sometimes upended during the English Revolution (1642-1660).

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.360.  The Modern British World: Imperial Encounters, Regimes, and Resistance, from the American Revolution to the present.  3 Credits.  

The Modern British World introduces some of the major themes and contestations tied to Britain’s rise to global dominance and its ultimate decline as an imperial power.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.361.  Age of Tolstoy.  3 Credits.  

Tolstoy and his era, 1820s to 1910s. Topics include state and politics, empire, the Russian identity, and forms of cultural expression. Students consider "War and Peace" and other masterworks.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.362.  Children and Childhood in the Middle Ages.  3 Credits.  

Seminar on the history of childhood and ideas of childhood around the medieval Mediterranean; themes include child custody; medieval education and punishment; parent-child private letters; child mortality and the arts of bereavement/consolation. Cross-listed with the Program in Islamic Studies and Near Eastern Studies.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.363.  The Development of the Sabbatian Movement.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the development of Sabbatianism, the most important messianic movement in the history of Judaism. We shall discuss the messianic claims of Sabbatai Tsevi, the spread of religious fervor among the Jews of Middle East, Europe, and North Africa, rabbinic opposition to the movement, and shall compare it to similar phenomena in Islam and Christianity. Special attention will be paid to reading of primary Sabbatian sources in English translation.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.364.  Sacrilegious Jews: Accusations of Ritual Crime in Pre-Modern Europe.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine the history of the accusations of the Jews of ritual crime (blood libel, host desecration etc.) in pre-modern Europe.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.365.  Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages.  3 Credits.  

History 100.365 will consist of two lectures a week and one discussion section. Readings focus when possible on primary sources. It will cover the social, economic, political and intellectual development of medieval society, beginning with the rise of feudal society, the development of medieval courtly culture, primarily the creation of epic and romance literature in the various courts of Europe; the creation of universities and the intellectual revival of Europe in the form of scholasticism; the re-emergence of trade and, with it, the rise of a middle class, the political development of royal authority which was tantamount to the creation of the modern national state and finally, the emergence of heresy and new forms of spirituality in the late Middle Ages to combat it, especially with the creation of the Dominican and Franciscan monastic orders.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.368.  History of Colombia 1800-present.  3 Credits.  

This seminar examines the key moments in the history of Colombia from its independence in 1810 and the construction of a Liberal Republic. The course will concentrate on the crucial political events that have defined Colombia up until the present.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.369.  Themes and Concepts in Jewish History.  3 Credits.  

The course will introduce the student to the main themes and debates in Jewish historiography from the 19th century to the present.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.371.  Modernity, Catastrophe, and Power in Jewish History: 1881 to the Present.  3 Credits.  

Jewish history, politics, and culture across a century of enormous transformations and transformative enormities in Europe, the US, and the Middle East. Topics include: impacts on Jewish life of World War I, the Russian Revolution, and the post-imperial reordering of the Eastern Europe and the Middle East; Zionism and other modes of Jewish contestatory politics; the consolidation of American Jewry; Nazism and the Holocaust in Europe; formation and development of the State of Israel; the global reordering of Jewish life amid cross-currents of the Cold War, conflict in the Middle East, and success in the US. Substantial attention to recent and contemporary history including the dramatic changes in Israeli society and polity over the past forty years and the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.373.  Crime, Punishment, Felony and Freedom: Law and Society in Pre-Modern England.  3 Credits.  

Using legal texts as a window into English society, we will address the changing nature of royal power, trial by jury, treason, felony, and the freedoms enshrined in the Magna Carta.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.374.  Conquest, Conversion, and Language Change in the Middle Ages.  3 Credits.  

Examines case-studies of imperial conquests (Islamic, Mongol, reconquista, early colonialism) and attendant changes in religion (Christianization; Islamization) and in language (Arabization; transition from Latin to European vernaculars) across medieval Eurasia.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.375.  Histories of Women and the Vote.  3 Credits.  

The year 2020 will mark 100 years since the 19th Amendment guaranteed American women the right to vote. Or did it? This course will examine the long history of women’s voting rights in the United States, including the story that extends from a convention at Seneca Falls, NY to a constitutional amendment. It will also examine alternative stories, especially those of women of color whose campaigns for the vote did not end in 1920 – and continue until today.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.376.  The Haitian Revolution in Global Perspective.  3 Credits.  

An advanced undergraduate seminar tracing the history of the Haitian Revolution from its origins in the early modern Atlantic world to its global impact and continuing legacies in the present.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.377.  The Age of Reason on the Silver Screen: Cinematic Representations of the Enlightenment.  3 Credits.  

This course will discuss the problem of historical representation on the basis of an analysis of movies depicting the Age of the Enlightenment.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.378.  Race and Capitalism in the City.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the intersections of race and capital in U.S. cities since 1800. In addition to classroom lectures and exercises involving various kinds of digital media, students will participate in walking tours exploring the particular conjunctures of race and economic development in Baltimore as manifested through the histories of slavery, segregation, and post-1960s urban growth. Students will also gain practice communicating their ideas through blog posts, policy briefings, and other modes of reporting.

Area: Humanities

AS.100.382.  Early Modern African Atlantic.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the history of West and Central Africa and its diasporic people and cultures during the early modern period (c. 1400-1750) in disparate parts of the Atlantic world, including Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Anglo-America. Themes include: West and Central African political and religious cultures; trans-Atlantic slavery; African Christianity; and the question of cultural survivals.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.384.  Intoxicated: Commodities & Globalization in the Early Modern World.  3 Credits.  

Each week we examine a commodity that defined a new era of global connectivity in the centuries after 1492, including money, medicines, slaves, and fashion.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.386.  The Cold War as Sports History.  3 Credits.  

Sport is key to understanding the Cold War. We will investigate how the Cold War has shaped sports, the Olympic movement, the role of athletes and international competitions and how sports relate to race, gender, and class. We will discuss the ways in which sports confirm and consolidate but also challenge and change social structures and opportunities of self-fulfillment and social advancement.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.387.  Everyday Life in the Medieval Middle East.  3 Credits.  

Explores the daily lives of non-elites in the medieval Middle East—food; housing; clothes; marriage and divorce; urban festivals—through primary documents (e.g. letters, court records) and artifacts (e.g. clothing).Pre-requisite for enrollment: Students must have taken one history course.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.389.  History of Law and Social Justice.  3 Credits.  

Cause lawyering aims to change the status quo. This course examines histories of this approach to social justice, from battles against the slave trade to contemporary campaigns for marriage equality.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.390.  The Medieval Crusades: Cultural Convergence and Religious Conflict, 1000-1400.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the origins of the idea of crusading, examines the experiences of those who traveled east, and analyzes the cultures of contact that developed ca. 1095 and 1291.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.391.  Impeachments and Beyond: Law, Justice, and Politics in Latin America.  3 Credits.  

Students taking this course will explore the intersections of the legal and political histories in Latin America, from indigenous legalities to current constitutional thought, corruption scandals, and lawfare.

Prerequisite(s): Students cannot enroll in this course if they have taken/passed AS.100.237.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.392.  The Art of Lying: Lie, Dissimulation, and the "Fake News" in Pre-modern Europe.  3 Credits.  

The course will examine the early modern attitudes to lie and dissimulation.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.394.  Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy).  3 Credits.  

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.395.  History of Global Development.  3 Credits.  

This course explores development as an ideology and a practice. From colonialism to the Cold War to contemporary NGOs, we will interrogate the history of our attempts to improve the world.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.398.  Images of Postwar Japan.  3 Credits.  

This seminar explores Japan’s changing place in the world in the decades following World War II, with an emphasis on analyzing visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, and comic books. Topics include relations with the U.S. and other countries in East Asia, particularly the two Koreas; the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and the global contexts for an expanding Japanese consumerism in the late 20th century.

Writing Intensive

AS.100.399.  Decolonization and Citizenship in Africa, 1945-2015.  3 Credits.  

Critically explores issues of decolonization and citizenship in Africa from WWII to the present. Emphasis on political inclusion and exclusion, and violence, fostered by nationalist movements and postcolonial African governments.

Area: Humanities

Writing Intensive

AS.100.403.  Law & Custom in Colonial Africa.  3 Credits.  

Examines how colonial rule transformed African legal systems, while Africans used European law for political resistance and personal gain. Research project based on colonial South African court records.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.404.  John Locke.  3 Credits.  

Seminar style course in which John Locke’s major works will be read intensively, together with some of his contemporaries’ works, and select scholarly interpretations.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.408.  Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th Century.  3 Credits.  

We will read and analyze key works of social and critical theory produced in relation to 20th and 21st century problems of state and society, nationalism, empire, totalitarianism, genocide, capitalism, political order, gender, race, sexuality, secularism, religion, environmental catastrophe. Possible readings include Weber, Du Bois, Adorno, Arendt, Foucault, Balibar, Beckamong others.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.413.  London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital city.  3 Credits.  

Seminar-style class analyzing the social, cultural, gender, religious, economic, and political history of London from Shakespeare's time through revolutions, plague, fire, and commercial, colonial, and industrial expansion.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.414.  Love, Death, and the Afterlife in the Medieval West.  3 Credits.  

Romantic love, it is often claimed, is an invention of the High Middle Ages. The vocabulary of sexual desire that is still current in the twenty-first century was authored in the twelfth and thirteenth, by troubadours, court poets, writers like Dante; even by crusaders returning from the eastern Mediterranean. How did this devout society come to elevate the experience of sensual love? This course draws on primary sources such as medieval songs, folktales, the “epic rap battles” of the thirteenth century, along with the writings of Boccaccio, Saint Augustine and others, to understand the unexpected connections between love, death, and the afterlife from late antiquity to the fourteenth century. Each week, we will use a literary or artistic work as an interpretive window into cultural attitudes towards love, death or the afterlife. These readings are analyzed in tandem with major historical developments, including the rise of Christianity, the emergence of feudal society and chivalric culture, the crusading movement, and the social breakdown of the fourteenth century.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.415.  The Holocaust in Jewish History and in Global Culture.  3 Credits.  

Key works on the history of Nazi Germany’s murder of European Jewry during the Second World War; Jewish responses; the recasting of Jewish and global thought in relation to this signal event; genocide and ‘ethnic cleansing’ since the Holocaust.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.416.  History through Things: Objects, Circulation, and Encounters in the Medieval World.  3 Credits.  

Objects from the past offer a powerful window into a set of experiences not recorded in texts. We will follow objects and things as they appear in lists, letters, and descriptions, as they travel surprising routes, and bring to life the medieval world before 1400.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.417.  Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the ideas of Joseph A. Schumpeter, the father of entrepreneurial studies. Each student will develop a perspective on the history of capitalism and socialism.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.418.  Comparative Slavery: Haiti and Brazil.  3 Credits.  

Haiti is born after a powerful slave insurrection (1804). Brazil was the last country to abolish slavery (1888). Why did these slave societies, which shared many common characteristics, have such different histories?

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.421.  Sex, Law and Islam.  3 Credits.  

ISIS, “virgins” in paradise, the sexual slavery of Yazidi women…. This course will use anthropological and historical studies to examine the long history of how rules and understandings about sex, sexuality, and gender have mattered in how people think about Islam.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.422.  Society & Social Change in 18th Century China.  3 Credits.  

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.423.  Multiethnic Japan.  3 Credits.  

An advanced undergraduate seminar on the intertwined histories of race, ethnicity, and empire in Japan and its former colonies from the early twentieth century to the present.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.424.  Women & Modern Chinese History.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the experience of Chinese women, and also how writers, scholars, and politicians (often male, sometimes foreign) have represented women’s experiences for their own political and social agendas.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.426.  Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe.  3 Credits.  

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.430.  Gender and Sexuality in African History.  3 Credits.  

An upper-level history reading seminar with a focus on histories of gender and sexuality in colonial and postcolonial Africa.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.433.  Free Speech and Censorship in the United States.  3 Credits.  

This undergraduate research seminar will examine censorship laws, practices, and debates from the eighteenth century to the present. In addition to discussing common readings, each student will choose a censorship case to research and present to the class.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.438.  The City Victorious: Medieval Cairo.  3 Credits.  

What was medieval Cairo like? Students explore urban life in this imperial capital (969-1517), including food and market habits; relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims; patronage; plague, drought, and famine.Pre-requisite for enrollment: Students must have taken two history courses.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.441.  Migration and the Americas.  3 Credits.  

From the Spanish Conquest to contemporary debates in the US, this course looks at the great diversity of migrations that have shaped life in the Americas.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.442.  The Intellectual History of Capitalism, 1900 to present.  3 Credits.  

This course examines shifting understandings of the philosophical foundations, political implications, and social effects of the market economy since the early twentieth century.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.444.  Migrants and Refugees in Africa.  3 Credits.  

A history of forced and voluntary migration and displacement in Africa, its causes and consequences, with a focus on refugees and labor migrants since 1960.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.456.  Getting Medieval? Public Violence in the Middle Ages.  3 Credits.  

Traditional studies and popular culture often consider violence as a hallmark of medieval life and hence, present it as a fundamental difference between a ‘brutal and violent’ Middle Ages and a ‘civilized and humane’ (Western) modernity. To evaluate these claims and images, we will examine different forms of violence in medieval societies—European and Middle Eastern—especially (i) martyrdom, (ii) communal violence, and (iii) public punishment. After exploring the specific cultural meanings of these practices, we will re-examine those modern polemics that invoke ‘the medieval’ (often vis-à-vis non-Western traditions and societies).

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.478.  Japan from its Peripheries.  3 Credits.  

An advanced undergraduate seminar on the history of modern Japan from the perspective of regions and people often considered as belonging to its geographical, cultural, social, and political peripheries.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.482.  Historiography of Modern China.  3 Credits.  

Reading and discussion of major approaches to Chinese history by Western, Chinese, and Japanese scholars and intellectuals, and of the cultural attitudes and policies they foster.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.486.  Jim Crow in America.  3 Credits.  

This course explores the history, politics, and culture of legalized racial segregation in the United State between the mid-nineteenth and twentieth centuries – a regime commonly known as “Jim Crow.”

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.488.  The Caribbean World, 1450-1850.  3 Credits.  

The Caribbean was the key focal point of overseas European expansion in the early modern world. This course traces developments in the region from the Tainos to Toussaint Louverture.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.490.  Writing Power, or Dueling in Print with Light Sabers: An RIC Seminar on Scholarly Composition.  3 Credits.  

A first-of-its kind seminar hosted by the Program in Racism, Immigration, and Citizenship, this course explores the practice of composition for professional writers. It considers the “light” and “dark” sides of clear, direct scholarly writing and intentional, academic obfuscation, respectively. Attendees will also learn strategies and potential hazards that accompany the written description of power in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.494.  Senior Honors Seminar.  1 Credit.  

A two-semester coordinating seminar for history majors writing senior honors theses. Admission is granted by instructor only after the student has selected a faculty thesis advisor. AS.100.494 is to be taken concurrently with AS.100.507 Senior Thesis.

Prerequisite(s): AS.100.494 is to be taken concurrently with AS.100.507 Senior Thesis.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.495.  Senior Honors Seminar.  1 Credit.  

The Senior Honors Seminar is a coordinating seminar for senior history majors who are writing senior honors theses and wish to graduate with departmental honors. To be taken concurrently with AS.100.508, Senior Thesis.

Corequisite(s): AS.100.508

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.497.  The Year 1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing Backlash.  3 Credits.  

The sixties were a decade of unrest, failed revolutions, and fundamental change across Europe and the US. We will look at how these years changed the world through the lens of national case studies and community engagement.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.498.  History of the Family & Gender in the United States.  3 Credits.  

Topics include: history of emotions; politics of sexuality and marriage; impact of race, ethnicity, and class on family life; women and gender inequality. Primarily colonial era through the early twentieth century, with some attention to contemporary politics of family, gender, and sexuality.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.499.  Film and Propaganda in Nazi Germany.  3 Credits.  

By examining a range of cinematic works—from explicitly ideological pseudo-documentaries to entertainment films—this course will explore the transmission of propaganda into the everyday culture of Nazi Germany.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.501.  Internship.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.100.502.  Internship.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.100.507.  Senior Thesis.  3 Credits.  

Two semesters. Senior thesis writers will undertake research in primary materials that will explore a significant historical issue or problem. The DUS will confirm admission as soon as the student has selected a faculty thesis advisor: the outside deadline for confirmation is May 1. AS.100.507 is to be taken concurrently with AS.100.494 Senior Honors Seminar.

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

Writing Intensive

AS.100.508.  Senior Thesis.  3 Credits.  

This seminar is required for senior history majors who are writing senior honors theses and wish to graduate with departmental honors.

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.;AS.100.507

Writing Intensive

AS.100.535.  Independent Study.  1 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.100.536.  Independent Study.  1 - 3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

Writing Intensive

AS.100.594.  Internship - Summer.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.100.599.  Independent Study.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.100.602.  The French Revolution.  

Introduces graduate students to the rich historiography of the French Revolution. Topics include: revolutionary origins, political culture and radicalization, citizenship, violence, family & gender, the search for stability after the Terror, global revolution, Napoleon’s Brumaire coup.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.603.  Readings in the Early U.S. Republic/Nineteenth Century.  

Readings in the Early U.S. Republic/Nineteenth Century. A continuation of course AS.100.604.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.604.  Readings in the Early U.S. Republic/Nineteenth Century.  

Readings in the Early U.S. Republic/Nineteenth Century

AS.100.605.  Modern Britain & the British Empire.  

Modern Britain and the British World is a graduate seminar which familiarizes students with major themes and historiographic debates in Modern British and Modern British Imperial History.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.606.  South African History and Historiography.  

Reading seminar in the history and historiography of South Africa from the late precolonial period through the present.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.607.  Consumer Revolution in Global Perspective.  

First semester of year-long seminar examining transformations in European consumption from 1650 to 1800. Topics include cultural theory; fashion, gender, and social identity; capitalism, retail, and credit; Enlightenment and the public sphere; political economy; overseas empire; globalization; and the Atlantic revolutions.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.608.  The Consumer Revolution in Global Perspective.  

Second semester of year-long seminar examining transformations in European consumption from 1650 to 1800. Topics include capitalism and consumption; political economy; fashion, gender, and identity; Enlightenment and the public sphere; globalization; empire and colonization; and the Atlantic revolutions.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.609.  "Baroque" as a Historical Category.  

This seminar will discuss the use of the concept of the "Baroque", as developed in the history of art, architecture, and music, as a category of historical periodization.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.611.  Kabbalah and the Enlightenment: Reading 'The Manuscript' Found in Saragossa.  

The course will discuss the European Enlightenment’s attitude to the Jewish esoteric lore. As a lens to discuss this topic, we shall use Jan Potocki’s novel “The Manuscript Found in Saragossa”.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.613.  Modern Japanese and Korean Histories.  

A reading seminar on the interconnected histories and historiographies of Japan and Korea in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.614.  Seminar in Modern Chinese History.  

A seminar covering major milestones in research on late imperial and modern Chinese history, primarily in English.Open to undergraduates with the permission of the instructor.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.615.  States, Scribes, and Archives: Medieval Arabic Documentary Cultures.  

A historical survey of the bureaucratic practices of medieval Islamic states (in comparative perspective); includes clos readings of primary official documents, e.g. petitions, edicts, fiscal receipts, and administrative reports.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.618.  Historiography of Law and Empire.  

Reading seminar covering recent work on the history of law in the context of empire. Emphasis on colonial rule in Africa, with some attention to Asia and the Americas.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.619.  Early Modern France.  

The second part of a two-semester sequence, this seminar examines the history of France and its empire from the seventeenth century to the French Revolution.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.620.  Early Modern France.  

The first part of a two-semester sequence, this seminar examines the history of France and its empire from the seventeenth century to the French Revolution.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.621.  Historiography of the Western European 1970s and 1980s.  

How have historians grappled with the quite recent past? We will explore histories of the 1970s and 1980s, with a focus on France, Germany, and the UK, as well as transnational and post-decolonization approaches.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.622.  Religion in Modernity: Theories and Histories.  

Drawing on key works in classic and contemporary social theory of religion and secularity as well as historical, ethnographic, and sociological monographs, this course investigates some scholars’ answers to the question of why we might want to take "religion in modernity" as an object of study (or not), what kinds of roles and importance religion (or various institutions, impulses, practices, and ideas connected to major faith traditions) has/have arguably enjoyed in an arguably global modernity often imagined as intrinsically secular, whether and how it matters that the category of religion itself may be a modern invention intertwined with specifically Christian-European and European imperial and colonial projects, whether and how we should take “secularism” or “secularity” as our object of study no less than or more than religion, what special kinds of research agendas and assumptions the empirical study of 'religion' and its workings and significance in modern political and cultural life might demand, what sorts of scholarly value it might add, and how the answers to those questions change when we look to a global present which is sometimes framed as post-secular. A more theoretically and comparatively oriented first part of the course will give way to focused attention on historical, sociological, and ethnographic monographs, with much attention to European, North American, and Near Eastern histories and societies, but ample room for students interested in East Asian, South Asian, African, and Latin American religious formations to investigate those literatures and bring to bear in class discussion. Readings likely include Weber, Bergson, Asad, Charles Taylor, de Vries, Lambek, Das, Roger Friedland, Wuthnow, Margaret Jacobs, Blackbourn, Mahmood, Susan Harding, William Connolly, Chidester, Bryan Turner.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.625.  The Right and the Far Right in Western Europe, 1870 to the Present.  

We will explore both classic and new histories of right-wing and far-right political movements.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.627.  Histories of Development.  

Reading seminar on the history of development as both ideology and practice in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.630.  Modern European Imperialism and the History of Sex and Sexuality.  

This reading seminar will explore how the history of sexuality has shaped recent historiographies of European empires.

AS.100.631.  Ibero-Atlantic History.  

A reading seminar on the history and historiography of the Portuguese and Spanish empires c. 1600-1900.

Area: Humanities

AS.100.632.  Capetian France: Documents, Devotions and Sovereign Authority.  

Through a careful study of texts and objects produced for and by the Capetian rulers during the thirteenth century we will interrogate the creation of the French state, the cultivation of royal ideology, and its practice of sovereign power.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.635.  Topics in European Imperial History.  

This graduate reading course covers key topics in European Imperial History, c. 1600-1900.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.638.  Reading Seminar in Early Modern History.  

This is a graduate seminar devoted to reading of sources and scholarship on the Early Modern Period.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.639.  Topics in the History and Sociology of Nationalism.  

Advanced topics in the history and sociology of nationalism, with special attention to questions of childhood and education in the age of the nation-state; memory and memory-conflicts; nation and European overseas empire. Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.640.  20th-Century European Imperial and Transnational Histories.  

This course will look at recent historiography on extranational approaches to 20th-century European histories, with a focus on France, the United Kingdom, USSR/Russia, and Germany.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.641.  Global Catholicism in the Early Modern Period.  

Explores religious culture in medieval and early modern Europe, with an emphasis on spiritual beliefs and practices, relics, miracles, pilgrimage, and saint-making. Emphasis on reading and discussing written sources and visual culture. Graduate students only.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.643.  Jewish Paths Through Modernity.  

Intensive introduction to the key trends and trajectories in modern Jewish history and the major themes in Jewish historiography. Intended to serve both graduate students outside the Jewish history field and graduate students pursuing a field in modern Jewish history.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.644.  Approaches to Brazilian History.  

A reading seminar on the history and historiography of Brazil (colonial and national periods). Open to undergraduates with the permission of the instructor.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.645.  Race, Law, History.  

This seminar examines the relationship of law to the construction of race and inequality in US history, investigating the legal archive through the perspectives of critical race theory and critical legal history. Course can be taken a maximum of two times.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.646.  Marvels and Wonder in medieval Arabic Culture.  

Explores the concept of marvels in different genres of medieval Arabic culture: Qur'anic exegesis; travel literature; 'ethnography'; cosmography and geography; marvels of the natural world (e.g. hermaphrodites); Muslim views of pre-Islamic ('pagan') monuments.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.648.  Crown, Court, and Charter: Political Culture in the High Middle Ages.  

Explores mechanisms of political power and the rise of the state in Europe during the High Middle Ages by analyzing royal ideology, administrative growth, legal change, and cultural production.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.653.  Africa in the Twentieth Century.  

Reading seminar emphasizing key developments in the historiography of Colonial and Postcolonial Africa.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.656.  Reading Koselleck.  

The course will be devoted to close reading of the works of Reinhardt Koselleck.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.657.  Reading Koselleck.  

The course will be devoted to close reading of the works of Reinhardt Koselleck.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.661.  Racial Literacy in the Archives.  

This course explores how to use race as a historical category of analysis, and teaches attendees how to locate how historical actors deploy race and racism to make claims, organize labor and identities, and imagine political possibility.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.664.  Heresy and the Holy: Religion and Society in Medieval Europe.  

The course explores the rise of heresy and holiness as categories during the Middle Ages.It traces the advent of religious movements, the effects of religious reform, the centralization of ecclesiastical authority, the rise of vernacular spirituality and dissent, and analyzes the historiographical and methodological approaches to the study of medieval religion.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.666.  Topics in Modern Jewish History.  

Continuation of AS.100.668 Colloquium in Modern Jewish History.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.671.  Play and Violence in Medieval France.  

Since the work of Geertz, Huizinga, Bakhtin and Caillois, among others, the intersection of play and violence has been a focal point for historians, anthropologists, literary scholars, even psychologists. This seminar traces the twin themes of violence and play as instantiated by the fighting classes in the High Middle Ages, beginning with the emergence of the tournament and the crusading movement in the eleventh century. By examining sources in Old French and Latin, we will contextualize music, dances, comedies, and contests that accompanied the violent rituals around which French aristocratic life revolved. Course may not meet weekly.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.100.672.  Medieval Materialities: Objects, Ontologies, Texts and Contexts.  

We will use the meanings and methodologies of “materiality” to examine the medieval world, by analyzing objects, texts, networks, patterns of circulation and appropriation, aesthetics and enshrinement, production and knowledge communities.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.680.  Reading Seminar in Atlantic History 1600-1800.  

This reading seminar will highlight some of the major new works and wide-ranging genres in this lively, stimulating field.

AS.100.681.  Research Seminar in Atlantic History, 1600-1800.  

Writing workshop for graduate students at all stages presenting work in progress. Discussion of theories, methods, and challenges of graduate student writing.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.684.  Research Seminar in the Atlantic World, 1500-1810.  

This seminar selectively explores the emergence and subsequent growth of the Atlantic basin as a site for exchange among and within the continents of Europe, Africa, and the Americas in the early modern era.

AS.100.692.  Graduate Reading Seminar in Early American History.  

A probing look at various genres and classics ranging from Native Americans to the Early Republic.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.695.  Problems in U.S. Social & Cultural History.  

A graduate level seminar in social and cultural history in the 19th and 20th centuries.

AS.100.696.  Problems in American Society and Culture.  

An intensive graduate seminar exploring various topics in US social and cultural history, focusing on the period from the late 19th century to the late 20th century.

AS.100.699.  Neoliberalism.  

Readings on the history, theory, and politics of neoliberalism, from midcentury to the present.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.700.  American Intellectual History.  

Readings on late nineteenth- and twentieth-century American and transatlantic social theory.

AS.100.702.  European Empires in the Indian Ocean.  

A reading overview of Portuguese, Dutch, English and French empire in the Indian Ocean.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.703.  Nationhood and Nationalism: theory, historiography, sociologies.  

Theories, historiographies, and sociologies of nationhood and nationalism. Nationhood as institutional form, practical category, and site of contestation. Nationalisms and nationalist movements, nation-states and nationalizing states, borderlands, memory struggles. The subjectivities generated by nationalism and national conflict, including forms of national minorityhood. Recent work on national indifference, nation and empire, nation and religion, and supranationalisms and internationalisms.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.707.  The Black World.  

This course explores the practice of writing and reading the history of African Americans and the wider African Diaspora. Participants will share written work and do close readings of primary and secondary texts exploring the black experience in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.708.  The Black World II.  

This course explores the practice of writing and reading the history of African Americans and the wider African Diaspora. Participants will share written work and do close readings of primary and secondary texts exploring the black experience in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Continuation of AS.100.707.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.711.  Approaches to International, Transnational and Global History.  

Graduate students will read and analyze classic as well as recent works of International, Transnational and Global History.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.713.  Black Womanhood.  

What does a usable history of black womanhood (black queer and trans womanhood inclusive) look like? Black women’s history across time and space.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.716.  Cultural Theory For Historians.  

An examination of modern cultural theories, with emphasis on mass culture and consumerism. Authors include Simmel, Kracauer, Benjamin, Horkheimer, Adorno, Barthes, Debord, Bourdieu, and de Certeau.

AS.100.721.  Topics In African History.  

Critical readings on selected themes in African history and historiography.

AS.100.724.  Sex and Slavery.  

Research and methods in the field of sexuality and slavery studies. Graduate students may take this course up to two times.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.725.  Sex and Slavery II.  

Research and methods in the field of sexuality and slavery studies. Part 2: Caribbean & African Continent.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.728.  Historical Writing in the Middle Ages.  

The course will begin with readings of literary and critical theory, as a preparation for the study of modes of historical writing in the Middle Ages. We will then read a sampling of medieval historiographical texts, beginning with Eusebius and continuing throughout the Middle Ages.

AS.100.729.  Reading Seminar: British America and the Early United States in Atlantic Perspective.  

Introduction to the history and historiography on British North America and the United States.

AS.100.730.  Reading Seminar: British America and the Early United States in Atlantic Perspective.  

Continuation of AS.100.729 for students conducting field exams.

AS.100.731.  Colonial Africa: French African Empire.  

A reading seminar in colonial African history; the focus may be on French African empire.

AS.100.733.  Reading Qing Documents.  

Open to advanced undergraduates with at least one semester of Classical Chinese.This course has several objectives. First and foremost, it is a hands on document reading class designed to familiarize students with the skills, sources, and reference materials necessary to conduct research in Qing history. To that end, we will spend much of our time reading documents. At the same time, we will engage in problem solving exercises designed to develop and enhance basic research skills. Finally, several important archive-based secondary works in the secondary literature are available on reserve for your reference. These works demonstrate the ways in which historians have recently applied archival skills (and materials).

AS.100.735.  Early Modern Britain and the Early Modern British Empire.  
AS.100.736.  Early Modern Britain and the Early Modern British Empire.  
AS.100.738.  Women, Genders and Sexualities.  

In May 2020, Johns Hopkins will host the meeting of the Berkshire Conference on Women, Gender and Sexualities, a gathering of 1200 scholars from across the world. Our seminar will use the Berkshire Conference program to organize a set of readings that will anticipate the panels, roundtables, performances, and plenaries that will be on campus between May 28 and 31, 2020. Attendance at the conference is not required, but it is recommended.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.744.  Twentieth Century France and the French Empire.  

We will explore major recent work in the history of France, with particular attention to transnational and imperial questions.

AS.100.749.  Social Theory for Historians: Marx, Durkheim, Weber.  

An examination of the works of Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, as examples of the Hegelian, positivist, and hermeneutic traditions of social theory.

AS.100.751.  Early Modern European Intellectual History.  

Early Modern European Intellectual History

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.753.  Modern American Seminar.  

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in 20th century history. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.755.  Modern American Seminar.  

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in 20th century history. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.756.  Reading Seminar in Chinese History.  

A seminar covering recent work on late imperial and modern Chinese history, primarily in English.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.757.  Cultural Histories of Late Imperial China.  

This reading seminar will introduce graduate students and advanced undergraduates (by permission) to recent studies of Late Imperial and Republican China that can (by various standards) be classified as works of cultural history.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.759.  Arabic Historical Writing in the Middle Ages.  

The course examines various genres of Arabic historical writing during the high and late Middle Ages (10th-15th c.). All primary readings are in English/French translation (no Arabic required).

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.761.  History of Capitalism.  

Readings on the history of capitalism since the mid-nineteenth century, with an emphasis on the American context.

AS.100.762.  History and Historiography of 19th France in Europe and the World.  

This course will look at recent historiography on France and the French empire, notably in North Africa. We will pay particular attention to transnational and imperial questions.

AS.100.765.  Problems in Women and Gender Studies.  

An exploration of recent work in women’s and gender history, focusing on some of the following: sexuality, cultural production, politics, family formation, work, religion, difference, and civic orders.

AS.100.766.  Problems in the History of Women & Gender.  

An exploration of recent work in modern European and US women's and gender history, focusing on some of the following: sexuality, cultural production, politics, family formation, work, religion, differences, and civic orders. A continuation of AS.100.765.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.769.  Gender History Workshop.  

Workshop for presentation of works-in-progress on the history of women, gender, and/or sexuality, including drafts of dissertation chapters, research papers, talks, and proposals. Students in disciplines other than history are welcome.

AS.100.770.  Gender History Workshop.  

Workshop for presentation of works-in-progress on the history of women, gender, and/or sexuality, including drafts of dissertation chapters, research papers, talks, and proposals. Students in disciplines other than history are welcome. Graduate students only.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.781.  The Seminar.  

This course features presentations from invited speakers. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.782.  The Seminar.  

This course features presentations from invited speakers. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.783.  Seminar: Medieval Europe.  

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Medieval European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.784.  Seminar: Medieval Europe.  

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Medieval European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.785.  Seminar: Early Modern Europe.  

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Early Modern European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.786.  Seminar: Early Modern Europe.  

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Early Modern European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.787.  Seminar: Modern Europe.  

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Modern European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.788.  General Seminar: Modern Europe.  

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Modern European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.789.  Seminar: American.  

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in American History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.790.  General Seminar: America.  

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in American History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.791.  Seminar: Latin American.  

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Latin American History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly

AS.100.792.  General Seminar: Latin America.  

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Latin American History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.793.  Seminar: African.  

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in African History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.794.  General Seminar: Africa.  

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in African History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.

AS.100.797.  First Year Graduate Workshop.  

First-year graduate workshop for History PhD candidates only.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.798.  First Year Graduate Workshop.  

First-year graduate workshop for History PhD candidates only.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.100.801.  Dissertation Research.  
AS.100.802.  Dissertation Research.  
AS.100.803.  Independent Study.  
AS.100.804.  Independent Study.  
AS.100.821.  Fall Practicum.  
AS.100.822.  Spring Practicum.  
AS.100.890.  Independent Study.  
AS.100.891.  Summer Practicum.