AS.192.150.  States, Regimes & Contentious Politics.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces students to the study of politics and political life in the world, with a particular focus on the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa. Throughout the course, we will analyze the sources of order and disorder in modern states, addressing a series of questions, such as: why did nation-states form? What makes a state a nation? Why are some states democracies while others are not? How do people organize to fight oppression? Why does conflict sometimes turn violent? What are the causes of ethnic war? Drawing on a mix of classic works and contemporary scholarship, we will discuss the answers that scholars have formulated to address these and other questions, paying special attention to research design and the quality of argumentation.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.192.210.  Library Research Seminar for International Studies and Social Sciences.  1 Credit.  

Are you planning to do a research project for your independent study class, or preparing for a grant application, or working on a big research project for a research intensive class or graduation thesis, or just wishing to improve your research skills? If so, this course is for you! Through weekly two hour sessions over ten weeks, you will receive systematic training on major research tools, resources and techniques useful for any research project in international studies, political science, and other social science subjects. By the end of the course, you will be able to come up with a viable research topic, and complete a research statement that includes an abstract, problem statement and literature review based on in-depth research utilizing tools and techniques covered in the course. The skills you learn through the course will prepare you for any future research projects and advanced studies.

AS.192.225.  Economic Growth and Development in East Asia.  3 Credits.  

The course offers an overview of the complexities of East Asia’s development experience from a variety of perspectives, and it is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while also cultivating a broad grasp of the region and the distinct challenges of “East Asia fast-paced, sustained economic growth.”. Part I considers the origins of Asian economic development, analyses the common economic variables behind the region’s success, looks at the East Asian financial crisis and its lessons and assesses whether or not East Asian countries have learned them. Part II will focus on the development experiences of individual countries, with an emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Part III considers topics of special interest to Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, both in the real and financial/monetary sectors, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.192.270.  International Migration, Diasporas and Development.  3 Credits.  

International migration has emerged as one of most politically salient and contentious issues in the politics of advanced democracies. However, while the economic, political, and social impact of large immigrant inflows has prompted much debate and analysis in developed countries, the effects of emigration and diasporas on the source country are poorly understood. This seminar examines the economic and political challenges and opportunities of international migration and diasporas on countries of origin and policy options to address them.The seminar will examine a range of issues. Is the phenomenon of greater import in the current (and future) context than it has historically been and if so, why? How do selection characteristics of international migrants and reasons for leaving affect the country of origin? Why do diasporas differ in the forms of engagement with the country of origin? What explains the massive increases in financial remittances sent by immigrants to their countries of origin and what are their effects? The seminar will also examine non-pecuniary or “social” remittances, which reshape individual preferences and social norms and thereby influence economic, political, and social change. What are the human capital effects of international migration, ranging from the “brain-drain” of limited human capital to “brain-gain” effects arising from diasporic networks? How does the “long-distance” nationalism of diasporas that support more polarizing political parties and groups engaged in conflict affect international security? Finally, we will examine policies in both receiving and sending countries and how they affect outcomes in their countries as well as of migrants themselves. Are international agreements on migration feasible or will rising nationalism ensure that unilateral policies and bilateral arrangements prevail?

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.192.280.  China Under Revolution and Reform.  3 Credits.  

China is an emerging world power with a long history, a rich culture, and complex political struc-tures and processes. As a modern state, the People's Republic of China (PRC) continues to amaze and confound observers both inside and outside its borders. More than three decades after opening its doors to the outside world, China remains as important as it is misunderstood. This course is de-signed to provide you with a road map to help understand the fascinating world of Chinese politics and the contemporary Chinese state. The course presumes no prior knowledge of China.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.192.310.  Program Abroad: Populism in Comparative Perspective.  3 Credits.  

International Studies elective offered on the JHU Summer Program Abroad in Bologna. Open to students on the JHU Bologna Summer Program only. Permission required.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.192.315.  Politics of India.  3 Credits.  

India is the world’s largest democracy and its second most populous country. This course introduces core issues in the study of modern Indian politics. The class is organized around the following topics: we trace India's journey to Independence; the consolidation of democracy in the early decades; the relationship between the state and the economy; the state’s institutional architecture; how political parties and electoral campaigns operate; the threats posed by corruption, criminality and dynastic politics; the role of caste and religion in shaping politics; the political and economic consequences of economic liberalization; elections; and the recent rise of right-wing hindutva in the country. The focus is on building knowledge and understanding of the Indian case. But we will also consider to what extent India’s experience is reflective of more general theories of politics, and how they might change because of what India can teach us. Class sessions will be interactive, with plenty of opportunity for group discussion. The reading list is diverse and draws from political science, sociology, history, and anthropology.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.192.320.  Colonialism and Foreign intervention in the Middle East and Africa.  3 Credits.  

How did colonial rule and post-colonial foreign intervention shape the history and politics of states in the Middle East and Africa? The first part of this course focuses on the colonial period, examining the era of conquest, considering how and whether colonial rule differed from other types of ruling arrangements, and studying how people in colonized territories reacted to conquest and foreign rule. Part Two focuses on post-colonial foreign military interventions. Part Three considers the potential long-term consequences of colonialism and foreign intervention. The course focuses on British, French, and American imperialism. **This course is eligible for credit toward the Islamic Studies minor, but only if students relate their major research paper to Islam and also notify Prof. Lawrence at the beginning of the course of their intention to seek Islamic Studies credit.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.192.340.  Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty: Focus on Italy.  3 Credits.  

Summer course in International Studies offered on the JHU Summer Program in Bologna.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.192.350.  Capital and Climate: Italy in the Mirror of World History.  3 Credits.  

Summer course offered on the JHU Summer Abroad Program in Bologna, Italy

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.192.360.  Modern Warfare.  3 Credits.  

This course examines modern warfare from the Second World War to the present. It takes a broad historical perspective. Strategic decision-making, the effect of war on societies, technological change, experiences of the soldier, and different concepts of warfare will be examined. Students will be introduced to critical texts and key primary source documents. The course will start with the Second World War. It will then go on to the nuclear revolution, the Korean War, and the early Cold War. From there, the subject matter will turn to examine people’s war, focusing on Mao and the Chinese Civil War and then Vietnam. Next, the Arab-Israeli conflicts will be discussed before moving on to the new strategic environment of the post-Cold War world and the long war against “terrorism” in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, and elsewhere. Finally, the course will look at recent technological change, clashes, and new players. Throughout, special attention will be paid to the non-Western view and experience of war.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.192.401.  Political Violence.  2 Credits.  

This class will function predominantly as a discussion seminar that uses the case of the Lebanese Civil War to examine the causes, duration, and dynamics of civil war as well as the debates surrounding foreign intervention and peacebuilding. Themes include: ethnic violence; economic explanations for civil war; civilian targeting; intra-rebellion dynamics; sexual and gender-based violence; election violence; occupation; peacekeeping; and the Responsibility to Protect.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.192.402.  Military Organizations in the Middle East and North Africa.  2 Credits.  

This course will examine the diverse roles state and non-state military organizations play in MENA politics, economics, and society. Each week will use an organizational case study as a window into core themes such as military involvement in state economies, militia politics, or combatant discipline in war.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.192.403.  Qualitative Research.  3 Credits.  

This class is designed to introduce students to qualitative methodology. Practically, students will gain first hand experience with qualitative research methods via research design, ethics review, in-depth interviewing, participant observation, and archival/primary source research. They will learn to deploy analytical techniques such as discourse analysis and process tracing. Students will also be asked to consider the merits of qualitative approaches more generally, and discuss the relative advantages of qualitative, experimental, and quantitative approaches. Questions that we will discuss include: What place should qualitative research have in a research design? Can qualitative research test hypotheses, or only generate them? Can qualitative research explain social phenomena, or only interpret them? What are the disadvantages and advantages of qualitative approaches compared to quantitative approaches? For what kinds of research questions are ethnographic techniques best suited? Is replicability possible for ethnographic field research? What criteria of evidence and analytical rigor apply on this terrain?

AS.192.404.  Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar.  3 Credits.  

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. The course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The course is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the economic and political development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I. Finally, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s economic and political developmental trajectories.

Area: Humanities

AS.192.410.  Kissinger Seminar on American Grand Strategy.  3 Credits.  

Enrollment is at the discretion of the instructors and space in the course is limited. To apply, email a one-page resume, one-page personal statement on why you want to take the class including how it contributes to your professional interests, and a writing sample of less than ten pages to KissingerCenter@jhu.edu. Applications are due by Monday, October 21, 2019. This course is an initiative of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS, meant to link SAIS with the undergraduate International Studies major at Homewood. It will expose exceptional undergraduate students to the study of grand strategy and the history of U.S. foreign policy. The bulk of the course will explore critical moments, themes, and people in the history of American grand strategy, from Washington’s Farewell Address to the statecraft of Donald Trump. The seminar will be rooted in applied history—the study of the past as a way of better understanding the challenges and opportunities of the present and future. It will also be interdisciplinary, drawing on international relations theory and contemporary policy studies. The seminar will equip students to evaluate and contribute to intense debates about the future of American grand strategy. In addition to regular classroom meetings, the course will feature events at the SAIS campus in Washington, DC, including meetings with current and former policymakers. These sessions will take place on February 10th, March 2th, April 6th, April 27th. Transportation between Homewood campus and SAIS will be provided. These sessions will be followed by a dinner hosted by the Kissinger Center.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences

AS.192.415.  The Battle of Ideas for the World Economy.  3 Credits.  

This seminar is intended as a capstone intellectual experience for seniors and advanced juniors majoring in international studies. The course presumes some background in economics, comparative politics, and international relations. This course will hone your analytical and writing skills by exposing you to theoretically advanced forms of political economy argument in a “proposition-opposition” format. The seminar is organized around a series of thematic pairings, covering such political economy themes like free trade vs. protectionism, free market capitalism vs. socialism, democratic erosion vs. autocratic strength, hegemonic stability vs. US abdication of power, or whether the current populist wave has mainly economic or mostly cultural roots. Each segment will deal with a specific topic area. Our discussions will involve in-depth interrogations of the arguments of these ‘pro-con’ authors.

Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Writing Intensive

AS.192.501.  Internship- International Studies.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.192.551.  Program Abroad: International Studies - Leadership Seminar.  1 Credit.  

The International Studies Leadership Seminar builds core leadership skills and introduces students to critical social, political and economic policies in their local and international contexts. The seminar takes place in different countries each year and builds upon global partnerships that exist between the International Studies Program, Johns Hopkins University, and academic institutions worldwide. Global partners include Waseda University, SAIS Europe, and Sciences Po, among others. Students engage in joint projects, panel presentations and other assignments designed to develop skills in critical analysis and public speaking. Seminar may be taken multiple times.

AS.192.591.  Research- International Studies.  1 Credit.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.192.598.  Independent Study.  3 Credits.  

Approval Required.

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

AS.192.599.  Independent Study.  3 Credits.  

Approval Required.

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.