EN.510.105.  Chocolate: An Introduction to Materials Science.  1 Credit.  

This course will introduce students to some basic concepts in materials science including phase diagrams, crystallization, and various characterization techniques, all through the close examination of chocolate. Students will have the opportunity to try some of their own experiments to see these processes in action. This course is directed toward freshman or sophomore engineering and natural science students with no previous background in these topics.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.106.  Foundations of Materials Science & Engineering.  3 Credits.  

Basic principles of materials science and engineering and how they apply to the behavior of materials in the solid state. The relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and crystal structure is developed. Attention is given to characterization of atomic and molecular arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids: metals, ceramics, semiconductors and polymers (including proteins). The processing and synthesis of these different categories of materials. Basics about the phase diagrams of alloys and mass transport in phase transformations. Introduction to materials behavior including their mechanical, chemical, electronic, magnetic, optical and biological properties.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.107.  Modern Alchemy.  3 Credits.  

Can you really turn lead into gold? Converting common substances into useful materials that play important roles in today’s technologies is the goal of many modern scientists and engineers. In this course, we will survey selected topics related to modern materials, the processes that are used to make them as well as the inspiration that led to their development. Topics will include the saga of electronic paper, the sticky stuff of gecko feet and the stretchy truth of metal rubber.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.135.  MSE Design Team I.  3 Credits.  

This course is the first half of a two-semester course sequence for freshmen majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering (MSE). This course provides a broad exposure to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE freshmen working with a team leader and seniors on the team, apply their general knowledge in MSE to develop the solution to open-ended problems. Materials Science & Engineering Freshman Only. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.106, EN.510.109, or equivalent courses. *The team will meet 150 minutes per week at a time to be designated by the instructor.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.136.  MSE Design Team I.  3 Credits.  

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence for freshmen majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering (MSE). This course provides a broad exposure to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE freshmen working with a team leader and seniors on the team, apply their general knowledge in MSE to develop the solution to open-ended problems. Materials Science & Engineering Freshman Only. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.106, EN.510.109, or equivalent courses. *The team will meet 150 minutes per week at a time to be designated by the instructor.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.235.  MSE Design Team I.  3 Credits.  

This course is the first half of a two-semester course sequence for sophomores majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering (MSE). This course provides a broad exposure to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE freshmen working with a team leader and seniors on the team, apply their general knowledge in MSE to develop the solution to open-ended problems. Materials Science & Engineering Sophomores Only. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.106, EN.510.109, or equivalent courses. *The team will meet 150 minutes per week at a time to be designated by the instructor.

EN.510.236.  MSE Design Team I.  3 Credits.  

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence for sophomores majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering (MSE). This course provides a broad exposure to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE freshmen working with a team leader and seniors on the team, apply their general knowledge in MSE to develop the solution to open-ended problems. Materials Science & Engineering Sophomores Only. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.106, EN.510.109, or equivalent courses. *The team will meet 150 minutes per week at a time to be designated by the instructor.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.311.  Structure Of Materials.  3 Credits.  

First of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course seeks to develop an understanding of the structure of materials starting at the atomic scale and building up to macroscopic structures. Topics include bonding, crystal structures, crystalline defects, symmetry and crystallography, microstructure, liquids and amorphous solids, diffraction, molecular solids and polymers, liquid crystals, amphiphilic materials, and colloids. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers) or equivalent.

Prerequisite(s): ((AS.110.106 AND AS.110.107) OR (AS.110.108 AND AS.110.109) OR (AS.110.107 AND AS.110.108) OR (AS.110.106 OR AS.110.109)) AND (AS.030.103 OR(AS.030.101 AND AS.030.102)) AND ((AS.171.101 OR AS.171.103 OR AS.171.107) AND (AS.171.102 OR AS.171.104 OR AS.171.108))

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.312.  Thermodynamics/Materials.  3 Credits.  

Second of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course examines the principles of thermodynamics as they apply to materials. Topics include fundamental principles of thermodynamics, equilibrium in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, thermodynamics of multicomponent systems, phase diagrams, thermodynamics of defects, and elementary statistical thermodynamics. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers) or equivalent.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.313.  Mechanical Properties of Materials.  3 Credits.  

Third of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course is devoted to a study of the mechanical properties of materials. Lecture topics include elasticity, anelasticity, plasticity, and fracture. The concept of dislocations and their interaction with other lattice defects is introduced. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed.

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.202

Corequisite(s): EN.510.311

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.314.  Electronic Properties of Materials.  3 Credits.  

Fourth of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course is devoted to a study of the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials. Lecture topics include electrical and thermal conductivity, thermoelectricity, transport phenomena, dielectric effects, piezoelectricity, and magnetic phenomena. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers) or equivalent.

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.311

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.315.  Physical Chemistry of Materials II.  3 Credits.  

Fifth of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course covers diffusion and phase transformations in materials. Topics include Fick's laws of diffusion, atomic theory of diffusion, diffusion in multi-component systems, solidification, diffusional and diffusionless transformations, and interfacial phenomena. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers) or equivalent.

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.311 AND EN.510.312

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.316.  Biomaterials I.  3 Credits.  

Sixth of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course offers an overview of principles and properties of biomedical materials. Topics include properties of materials used in medicine, synthesis and properties of polymeric materials, polymeric biomaterials, natural and recombinant biomaterials, biodegradable materials, hydrogels, stimuli-sensitive materials, and characterizations of biomaterials. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers) or equivalent.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.335.  MSE Design Team I.  3 Credits.  

This course is the first half of a two-semester course sequence for freshmen, sophomores, and juniors majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering (MSE). This course provides a broad exposure to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, working with a team leader and seniors on the team, apply their general knowledge in MSE to develop the solution to open-ended problems. *The team will meet 150 minutes per week at a time to be designated by the instructor.Recommended Course Background: EN.510.101, EN.510.109, or equivalent courses.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.336.  MSE Design Team I.  3 Credits.  

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence for juniors majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering (MSE). This course provides a broad exposure to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE juniors working with a team leader and seniors on the team, apply their general knowledge in MSE to develop the solution to open-ended problems. Materials Science & Engineering Freshman Only. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.106, EN.510.109, or equivalent courses. *The team will meet 150 minutes per week at a time to be designated by the instructor.

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.335

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.400.  Introduction to Ceramics.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine the fundamental structure and property relationships in ceramic materials. Areas to be studied include the chemistry and structure of ceramics and glasses, microstructure and property relationships, ceramic phase relationships, and ceramic properties. Particular emphasis will be placed on the physical chemistry of particulate systems, characterization, and the surface of colloid chemistry of ceramics. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.311, EN.510.312, or permission of instructor.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.402.  Soft Materials.  3 Credits.  

The structure and properties of soft materials will be studied with the focus on understanding ways to control and measure the dynamics. Soft materials to be studied include colloids, emulsions, dispersions, drops, polymers and gels. We will use experimental tools to study these materials including optical microscopy, rheometers, and atomic force microscopy. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.311 or permission of instructor.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.403.  Materials Characterization.  3 Credits.  

This course will describe a variety of techniques used to characterize the structure and composition of engineering materials, including metals, ceramics, polymers, composites and semiconductors. The emphasis will be on microstructural characterization techniques, including optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermal analysis and surface analytical techniques, including Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Working with the JHU museums, we will use the techniques learned in class to characterize historic artifacts.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.405.  Materials Science of Energy Technologies.  3 Credits.  

This course examines the science and engineering of contemporary and cutting-edge energy technologies. Materials Science and Mechanical Engineering fundamentals in thisarea will be complemented by case studies that include fuel cells, solar cells, lighting, thermoelectrics, wind turbines, engines, nuclearpower, biofuels, and catalysis. Students willconsider various alternative energy systems, and also to research and engineering of traditional energy technologies aimed at increased efficiency, conservation, and sustainability. Recommended Course Background: undergraduate course in thermodynamics.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.407.  Biomaterials II: Host response and biomaterials applications.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on the interaction of biomaterials with the biological system and applications of biomaterials. Topics include host reactions to biomaterials and their evaluation, cell-biomaterials interaction, biomaterials for tissue engineering applications, biomaterials for controlled drug and gene delivery, biomaterials for cardiovascular applications, biomaterials for orthopedic applications, and biomaterials for artificial organs. Also listed as EN.510.607.

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.316 or permission of instructor.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.414.  Transmission electron microscopy: principle and practice.  3 Credits.  

Introduction to basic principles of electron diffraction, phase contrast and Z-contrast and applications of these principles in microstructural characterization of materials by electron diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Also listed as EN.510.665.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.415.  The Chemistry of Materials Synthesis.  3 Credits.  

Many of the latest breakthroughs in materials science and engineering have been driven by new approaches to their synthesis, which has allowed the preparation of materials with fanciful structures and fascinating properties. This advanced course will explore synthetic approaches to multifunctional and nanostructured materials, ranging from opals to complex polymers to nanowires and quantum dots . Applications include electronics, energetics, and drug delivery. Participants will gain sufficient familiarity with synthesis options to be able to design research programs that rely on them. Emphasis will be placed on broad strategies that lead to material functionality, rather than detailed step-by-step sequences. Some topics will be selected “on the fly” from the most exciting current literature.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.416.  Physical Behavior of Metamaterials.  3 Credits.  

The field of metamaterials is a rapidly evolving area within the physical and engineering sciences that relates to diverse applications such as transformation optics for advanced imaging, acoustic noise reduction for architectural spaces and electromagnetic shielding for electronic devices. The goal of metamaterials design is to guide energy transport through specified regions of a material avoiding others that might contain delicate or otherwise susceptible structures that must be shielded. Energy transport can occur via electromagnetic waves, acoustic waves, electrical currents or thermal fluxes. Through rational design of the material micro/meso/macrostructure, any one of these can be effectively directed in the material. The challenge is to engineer materials that respond in a way that approximates the desired design. In this course, the methods for metamaterials design will be investigated along with those aspects of materials science and engineering that allow for the fabrication of these materials. Also listed as EN.510.616

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.31 AND EN.510.314 or their equivalents

EN.510.420.  Stealth Science & Engineering.  3 Credits.  

The goal of stealth engineering is the creation of objects that are not easily detected using remote sensing techniques. To achieve this end, engineered systems of materials are arrayed to alter the signature of objects by reducing energy returned to remote observers. This course will provide an introduction to the general principles behind signature reduction by examining the mathematics and science behind basic electromagnetic and acoustic transport processes. Specific topics will include energy absorbing materials, anti-reflection coatings, wave guiding and scattering, metamaterials and adaptive screens. Co-listed with EN.510.640

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.422.  Micro and Nano Structured Materials & Devices.  3 Credits.  

Almost every material’s property changes with scale. We will examine ways to make micro- and nano-structured materials and discuss their mechanical, electrical, and chemical properties. Topics include the physics and chemistry of physical vapor deposition, thin film patterning, and microstructural characterization. Particular attention will be paid to current technologies including computer chips and memory, thin film sensors, diffusion barriers, protective coatings, and microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.425.  Advanced Materials for Electrochemical Energy Storage.  3 Credits.  

This class provides an overview of the basic principles of electrochemical energy storage and the essential roles of advanced materials in batteries. Materials selection and design for the anodes and cathodes of lithium and sodium batteries are introduced on the basis of crystallography and materials chemistry. State-of-the-art operando characterization techniques of battery materials are also discussed in the course.

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.311 AND EN.510.312

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.426.  Biomolecular Materials I - Soluble Proteins and Amphiphiles.  3 Credits.  

This course will examine the fundamental structure, interactions, and function relationship for biological macromolecules. The course will emphasize experimental methods and experimental design, and the physics behind human disease. Topics will include micellization, protein folding and misfolding, and macromolecular interactions. Required Course Pre-Requisites: EN.580.221 & EN.510.312 - Co-listed with EN.510.621

Prerequisite(s): EN.580.221 AND EN.510.312

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.427.  Chemistry of Nanomaterials.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces the fundamental principles necessary to understand the behavior of materials at length scales larger than atoms or molecules with applications in chemistry and materials science. This course will explore topics such as nanoparticle synthesis and self assembly, ordered porous materials, catalysis, nanostructured thin films, and solar energy conversion. Size dependent properties of nanomaterials will be discussed. Co-listed with EN.510.661.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.428.  Material Science Laboratory I.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on characterizing the microstructure and mechanical properties of structural materials that are commonly used in modern technology. A group of A1 alloys, Ti alloys, carbon and alloy steels, and composite materials that are found, for example, in actual bicycles will be selected for examination. Their microstructures will be studied using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of these same materials will be characterized using tension, compression, impact, and hardness tests. The critical ability to vary microstructure and therefore properties through mechanical and heat treatments will also be demonstrated and investigated in the above materials. Restricted to Materials Science & Engineering juniors only

Prerequisite(s): Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class. To access the tutorial, login to myLearning and enter 458083 in the Search box to locate the appropriate module.;EN.510.311

Corequisite(s): EN.510.313

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

Writing Intensive

EN.510.429.  Materials Science Laboratory II.  3 Credits.  

This laboratory concentrates on the experimental investigation of electronic properties of materials using basic measurement techniques. Topics include thermal conductivity of metal alloys, electrical conductivity of metals/metal alloys and semiconductors, electronic behavior at infrared wavelengths, magnetic behavior of materials, carrier mobility in semiconductors and the Hall effect in metals and semiconductors. Lab Assignment is by Professor. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.311 or Permission Required.

Prerequisite(s): Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class. To access the tutorial, login to myLearning and enter 458083 in the Search box to locate the appropriate module.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

Writing Intensive

EN.510.430.  Biomaterials Lab.  3 Credits.  

This laboratory course concentrates on synthesis, processing and characterization of materials for biomedical applications, and characterization of cell-materials interaction. Topics include synthesis of biodegradable polymers and degradation, electrospinning of polymer nanofibers, preparation of polymeric microspheres and drug release, preparation of plasmid DNA, polymer-mediated gene delivery, recombinant protein synthesis and purification, self-assembly of collagen fibril, surface functionalization of biomaterials, cell culture techniques, polymer substrates for cell culture, and mechanical properties of biological materials. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.407

Prerequisite(s): Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class. To access the tutorial, login to myLearning and enter 458083 in the Search box to locate the appropriate module.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

Writing Intensive

EN.510.433.  Senior Design Research.  3 Credits.  

This course is the first half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research. During this semester, students join ongoing graduate research projects for a typical 10-12 hours per week of hands-on research. Classroom activities include discussions, followed by writing of research pre-proposals (white papers), proposals, status reports and lecture critiques of the weekly departmental research seminar.Co-listed with EN.510.438 and EN.510.440

Prerequisite(s): (EN.510.311 AND EN.510.312 AND EN.510.313 AND EN.510.314 AND EN.510.315 EN.510.316) AND (EN.510.428 AND EN.510.429)

Area: Engineering

Writing Intensive

EN.510.434.  Senior Design/Research II.  3 Credits.  

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.311-EN.510.312, EN.510.428-EN.510.429, and EN.510.433Meets with EN.510.439, EN.510.441, EN.510.446, and EN.510.448

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

Writing Intensive

EN.510.435.  Mechanical Properties of Biomaterials.  3 Credits.  

This course will focus on the mechanical properties of biomaterials and the dependence of these properties on the microstructure of the materials. Organic and inorganic systems will be considered through a combination of lectures and readings and the material systems will range from cells to bones to artificial implants. Same course as 510.635.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.436.  Biomaterials for Cell Engineering.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on the development of biomaterials both as new tools to study fundamental biology and as means to direct cell behavior and function for biomedical applications. Topics include the material properties of cells and tissue, biomaterials for recapitulating cell microenvironment, biomaterials for studying and directing cell mechanotransduction, biomaterials for gene editing, biomaterials for immunotherapy, and biomaterials for neuroengineering. This course will have in-depth discussions on recent findings and publications in these areas.

Prerequisite(s): (EN.510.316 OR EN.510.407 OR EN.510.607)

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.438.  Biomaterials Senior Design I.  3 Credits.  

This course is the first half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring in materials science and engineering with the Biomaterials Concentration. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research with a focus on biomaterials. During this semester, students join ongoing graduate research projects for a typical 10-12 hours per week of hands-on experiences in design and research. Classroom activities include discussions, followed by writing of research pre-proposals (white papers), proposals, status reports and lecture critiques of departmental research seminars.Co-listed with EN.510.440 and EN.510.433

Prerequisite(s): (EN.510.311 AND EN.510.312 AND EN.510.313 AND EN.510.314 AND EN.510.315 EN.510.316) AND (EN.510.428 AND EN.510.429)

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

Writing Intensive

EN.510.439.  Biomaterials Senior Design II.  3 Credits.  

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring in materials science and engineering with the Biomaterials Concentration. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research with a focus on biomatreials. During this semester, verbal reporting of project activities and status is emphasized, culminating in student talks presented to a special session of students and faculty. Students also prepare a poster and a written final report summarizing their design and research results. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.311-EN.510.312, EN.510.428-EN.510.429, and EN.510.433 or 510.438 or 510.440Meets with EN.510.434, EN.510.441, EN.510.446, and EN.510.448

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

Writing Intensive

EN.510.440.  Nanomaterials Senior Design I.  3 Credits.  

This course is the first half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring in materials science and engineering with the Nanotechnology Concentration. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research with a focus on nanotechnology and nanomaterials. During this semester, students join ongoing graduate research projects for a typical 10-12 hours per week of hands-on experiences in design and research. Classroom activities include discussions, followed by writing of research pre-proposals (white papers), proposals, status reports and lecture critiques of departmental research seminars. Co-listed with EN.510.433 and EN.510.438

Prerequisite(s): (EN.510.311 AND EN.510.312 AND EN.510.313 AND EN.510.314 AND EN.510.315 EN.510.316) AND (EN.510.428 AND EN.510.429)

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

Writing Intensive

EN.510.441.  Nanomaterials Senior Design II.  3 Credits.  

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring in materials science and engineering with the Nanotechnology Concentration. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research with a focus on nanotechnology and nanomatreials. During this semester, verbal reporting of project activities and status is emphasized, culminating in student talks presented to a special session of students and faculty. Students also prepare a poster and a written final report summarizing their design and research results. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.311-EN.510.312, EN.510.428-EN.510.429, and EN.510.433 or 510.438 or 510.440Meets with EN.510.434, EN.510.439, EN.510.446, and EN.510.448

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

Writing Intensive

EN.510.442.  Nanomaterials Lab.  3 Credits.  

The objective of the laboratory course will be to give students hands on experience in nanotechnology based device fabrication through synthesis, patterning, and characterization of nanoscale materials. The students will use the knowledge gained from the specific synthesis, characterization and patterning labs to design and fabricate a working nanoscale/nanostructured device. The course will be augmented with comparisons to microscale materials and technologies. These comparisons will be key in understanding the unique phenomena that enable novel applications at the nanoscale. DMSE Seniors or permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite(s): Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class. To access the tutorial, login to myLearning and enter 458083 in the Search box to locate the appropriate module.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.443.  Chemistry and Physics of Polymers.  3 Credits.  

The course will describe and evaluate the synthetic routes, including condensation and addition polymerization, to macromolecules with varied constituents and properties. Factors that affect the efficiencies of the syntheses will be discussed. Properties of polymers that lead to technological applications will be covered, and the physical basis for these properties will be derived. Connections to mechanical, electronic, photonic, and biological applications will be made. Also listed as EN.510.643. Recommended Course Background: Organic Chemistry I and one semester of thermodynamics.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.444.  MSE Bone Marrow Design Team.  3 Credits.  

This course is the first half of a two-semester course sequence for senior students majoring or double majoring in MSE. This course provides current seniors with the opportunity to continue working on a design team project they were involved in as juniors while taking independent senior design (510.433 or equivalent). In this course, MSE seniors, working with a team leader and a group of freshmen, sophomores, and seniors, continue to apply their knowledge in their track area to generate the solution to open-ended problems encountered in MSE. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.101, EN.510.311, EN.510.312, EN.510.428, EN 510.429.

Writing Intensive

EN.510.445.  MSE Design Team II.  3 Credits.  

This course is the first half of a two-semester course sequence for senior students majoring or double majoring in MSE. This course provides a broad experience to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE seniors, working with a team leader and a group of freshmen, sophomores, and seniors, apply their knowledge in their track area to generate the solution to open-ended problems encountered in MSE. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.101, EN.510.311, EN.510.312, EN.510.428, EN 510.429.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

Writing Intensive

EN.510.446.  MSE Design Team II.  3 Credits.  

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence for senior students majoring or double majoring in MSE. This course provides a broad experience to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE seniors, working with a team leader and a group of freshmen, sophomores, and seniors, apply their knowledge in their track area to generate the solution to open-ended problems encountered in MSE. Materials Science & Engineering Seniors Only.Recommended Course Background: EN 510.101, EN 510.311, EN 510.312, EN 510.428, EN 510.429.Meets with EN.510.434, EN.510.439, EN.510.441 and EN.510.448.

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.445

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.447.  MSE Design Team Leader.  4 Credits.  

This course is the first half of a two-semester course sequence for students majoring or double majoring in MSE. This course provides a leadership experience to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting. In this course, MSE seniors assemble and lead a student team consisting of 3 to 6 students, apply their knowledge in their track area, and develop leadership skills to generate the solution to open-ended problems encountered in MSE.Recommended Course Background: EN.510.101, EN.510.311, EN.510.312, EN.510.428, EN 510.429.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

Writing Intensive

EN.510.448.  MSE Design Team Leader.  4 Credits.  

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence for students majoring or double majoring in MSE. This course provides a leadership experience to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting. In this course, MSE seniors assemble and lead a student team consisting of 3 to 6 students, apply their knowledge in their track area, and develop leadership skills to generate the solution to open-ended problems encountered in MSE. Materials Science & Engineering Seniors Only.Recommended Course Background: EN 510.101, EN 510.311, EN 510.312,EN. 510.428, EN 510.429.Meets with EN.510.434, EN.510.439, EN.510.441, and EN.510.446

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.447

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.449.  MSE Bone Marrow Design Team II.  3 Credits.  

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence for senior students majoring or double majoring in MSE. This course provides current seniors with the opportunity to continue working on a design team project they were involved in as juniors while taking independent senior design (510.433 or equivalent). In this course, MSE seniors, working with a team leader and a group of freshmen, sophomores, and seniors, continue to apply their knowledge in their track area to generate the solution to open-ended problems encountered in MSE. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.101, EN.510.311, EN.510.312, EN.510.428, EN 510.429. .

Writing Intensive

EN.510.450.  Three Dimensional Microstructural Characterization of Mateirals.  3 Credits.  

An undergraduate level introduction to experimental techniques and data analysis for characterizing the microstructure of materials in three dimensions.Topics to be covered include serial sectioning, principles of optical and scanning-electron microscopy and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), high-energy x-ray diffraction microscopy, and techniques for 3D data reduction, representation, and analysis. Pre-Requisites: 510.311 & 510.313. Also listed as EN.510.701.

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.311 AND EN.510.313

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.451.  Recycling for Sustainability.  3 Credits.  

“I’m so confused…which bin do I choose?” Recycling everyday materials and re-using objects made from them have been part of our country’s materials-usage landscape for decades. However, as we engineer a sustainable future, recycling will become an ever-increasing component of our strategies for material selection and product design. This course provides an overview of recycling – from the basics of materials recovery, processing and re-use to its economic and environmental impacts. Students will learn about industrial practices associated with recycling and how these relate to our everyday consumer behaviors. Field experiences and laboratory demonstrations will expose students to the realities of recycling. The challenges associated with recycling will be examined to gain a greater understanding of issues related to the use of materials in a sustainable world.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.457.  Materials Science of Thin Films.  3 Credits.  

The processing, structure, and properties of thin films are discussed emphasizing current areas of scientific and technological interest. Topics include elements of vacuum science and technology; chemical and physical vapor deposition processes; film growth and microstructure; chemical and microstructural characterization methods; epitaxy; mechanical properties such as internal stresses, adhesion, and strength; and technological applications such as superlattices, diffusion barriers, and protective coatings. Co-listed with EN.510.657

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.467.  Metal Additive Manufacturing.  3 Credits.  

Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known colloquially as 3D Printing, is a disruptive technology that has received significant attention in recent years in both the popular press and the manufacturing industry. While the current and potential future applications for this technology, especially for mission-critical metal parts, are impressive and imaginative, the full potential for metal AM has not been realized due to current limitations and a lack of full understanding of metal AM processes. In this class we will cover (1) the current state-of-the-art of AM; (2) the production steps necessary to manufacture AM parts; and (3) the closely linked topics of AM materials and AM processes. While non-metal AM materials such as polymers, composites, and ceramics will be included, the primary focus will be on metal materials fabricated with laser powder bed fusion processes. Specific topics covered will include conventional vs. AM materials, meltpool phenomena including solidification, kinetics and solid-state kinetics, post-process thermal treatments, the process-properties relationship, in-situ process sensing, indirect process measurement methods and process modeling. Recent implementations of metal additive manufacturing, such as those in the aerospace and health care industries, will be presented extensively throughout the class as study cases. Popular press articles and technical papers on AM will be reviewed and discussed. Students taking this class will be expected to participate actively and bring to the class real or potential applications of AM in their workplaces.Co-listed with EN.510.667

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.311 AND EN.510.315

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.501.  Undergraduate Research/Material Science.  3 Credits.  

Student participation in ongoing research activities. Research is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and often in conjunction with other members of the research group.

Prerequisite(s): Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.;You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

EN.510.502.  Research in Materials Science.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Student participation in ongoing research activities. Research is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and often in conjunction with other members of the research group.

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

EN.510.503.  Independent Study/Materials Science.  3 Credits.  

Individual programs of study are worked out between students and the professor supervising their independent study project. Topics selected are those not formally listed as regular courses and include a considerable design component.

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

EN.510.504.  Independent Study.  0 - 3 Credits.  

Individual programs of study are worked out between students and the professor supervising their independent study project. Topics selected are those not formally listed as regular courses and include a considerable design component.

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

EN.510.511.  Group Undergraduate Research/Material Science.  3 Credits.  

Student participation in ongoing research activities. Research is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and often in conjunction with other members of the research group. This section has a weekly research group meeting that students are expected to attend.

Prerequisite(s): Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.;You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

EN.510.597.  Research - Summer.  3 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): You must request Independent Academic Work using the Independent Academic Work form found in Student Self-Service: Registration > Online Forms.

EN.510.601.  Structure Of Materials.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to the structure of inorganic and polymeric materials. Topics include the atomic scale structure of metals, alloys, ceramics, and semiconductors; structure of polymers; crystal defects; elementary crystallography; tensor properties of crystals; and an introduction to the uses of diffraction techniques (including X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy) in studying the structure of materials. Recommended Course Background: undergraduate chemistry, physics, and calculus or permission of instructor.

EN.510.602.  Thermodynamics Of Materials.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to the classical and statistical thermodynamics of materials. Topics include the zeroth law of thermodynamics; the first law (work, internal energy, heat, enthalpy, heat capacity); the second law (heat engines, Carnot cycle, Clausius inequality, entropy, absolute temperature); equilibrium of single component systems (free energy, thermodynamic potentials, virtual variations, chemical potential, phase changes); equilibrium of multicomponent systems and chemical thermodynamics; basics of statistical physics (single and multiple particle partition functions, configurational entropy, third law; statistical thermodynamics of solid solutions); and equilibrium composition-temperature phase diagrams. Recommended Course Background: undergraduate calculus, chemistry, and physics or permission of instructor.

EN.510.603.  Phase Transformations of Materials.  3 Credits.  

This course presents a unified treatment of the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations from phenomenological and atomistic viewpoints. Phase transformations in condensed metal and nonmetal systems are discussed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.601 and EN.510.602

EN.510.604.  Mechanical Properties of Materials.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to the properties and mechanisms that control the mechanical performance of materials. Topics include mechanical testing, tensor description of stress and strain, isotropic and anisotropic elasticity, plastic behavior of crystals, dislocation theory, mechanisms of microscopic plasticity, creep, fracture, and deformation and fracture of polymers. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.601

EN.510.605.  Electrical, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials.  3 Credits.  

An overview of electrical, optical and magnetic properties arising from the fundamental electronic and atomic structure of materials. Continuum materials properties are developed through examination of microscopic processes. Emphasis will be placed on both fundamental principles and applications in contemporary materials technologies. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.601

EN.510.606.  Polymer Chemistry & Biology.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to the chemical and biological properties of organic and inorganic materials. Topics include an introduction to polymer science, polymer synthesis, chemical synthesis, and modification of inorganic materials, biomineralization, biosynthesis, and properties of natural materials (proteins, DNA, and polysaccharides), structure-property relationships in polymeric materials (synthetic polymers and structural proteins), and materials for biomedical applications. Recommended Course Background: undergraduate chemistry and biology or permission of instructor.

EN.510.607.  Biomaterials II: Host response and biomaterials applications.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on the interaction of biomaterials with the biological system and applications of biomaterials. Topics include host reactions to biomaterials and their evaluation, cell-biomaterials interaction, biomaterials for tissue engineering applications, biomaterials for controlled drug and gene delivery, biomaterials for cardiovascular applications, biomaterials for orthopedic applications, and biomaterials for artificial organs. Recommended Course Background: Undergraduate chemistry and basic cell biology. Also listed as EN.510.407

EN.510.610.  Fundamentals of Biomaterials.  3 Credits.  

This course provides an introduction to biomaterials in medicine. Topics include: hard and soft biomaterials, materials science concepts specific to biomaterials, surface thermodynamics, surfactants and surface functionalization, proteins and protein-surface interactions, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, wound healing and the inflammatory response, and drug delivery systems.Pre-requisites: 510.602 (Thermodynamics of Materials) or permission of instructor.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.614.  Macromolecular Drug Carriers.  3 Credits.  

In this course we will discuss recent literature findings regarding the design, synthesis, fabrication and characterization of macromolecular materials used as drug carriers. Topics include polymer synthesis, post-polymerization modification, structure-property relationships of nano-/micro-particles and hydrogels. Recommended Course Background: General Chemistry. Also listed as 510.401.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.615.  Physical Properties of Materials.  3 Credits.  

A detailed survey of the relationship between materials properties and underlying microstructure. Structure/property/processing relationships will be examined across a wide spectrum of materials including metals, ceramics, polymers and biomaterials, and properties including electrical, magnetic, optical, thermal, mechanical, chemical and biocompatibility.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.616.  Physical Behavior of Metamaterials.  3 Credits.  

The field of metamaterials is a rapidly evolving area within the physical and engineering sciences that relates to diverse applications such as transformation optics for advanced imaging, acoustic noise reduction for architectural spaces and electromagnetic shielding for electronic devices. The goal of metamaterials design is to guide energy transport through specified regions of a material avoiding others that might contain delicate or otherwise susceptible structures that must be shielded. Energy transport can occur via electromagnetic waves, acoustic waves, electrical currents or thermal fluxes. Through rational design of the material micro/meso/macrostructure, any one of these can be effectively directed in the material. The challenge is to engineer materials that respond in a way that approximates the desired design. In this course, the methods for metamaterials design will be investigated along with those aspects of materials science and engineering that allow for the fabrication of these materials. Also listed as EN.510.416

EN.510.621.  Biomolecular Materials I - Soluble Proteins and Amphiphiles.  3 Credits.  

Structure and function of cellular molecules (lipids, nucleic acids, proteins, and carbohydrates). Structure and function of molecular machines (enzymes for biosynthesis, motors, pumps). Protein synthesis using recombinant nucleic acid methods. Advanced materials development. Interactions of biopolymers, lipid membranes, and their complexes. Mean field theories, fluctuation and correlation effects. Self assembly in biomolecular materials. Biomedical applications. Characterization techniques. Structure and function of cellular molecules (lipids, nucleic acids, proteins, and carbohydrates). Structure and function of molecular machines (enzymes for biosynthesis, motors, pumps). Protein synthesis using recombinant nucleic acid methods. Advanced materials development. Interactions of biopolymers, lipid membranes, and their complexes. Mean field theories, fluctuation and correlation effects. Self assembly in biomolecular materials. Biomedical applications. Characterization techniques. Co-listed with EN.510.426.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.622.  Micro and Nano Structured Materials & Devices.  3 Credits.  

Almost every material's property changes with scale. We will examine ways to make micro- and nano-structured materials and discuss therir mechanical , electrical, and chemical properties. Topics include the physics and chemistry of physical vapor deposition, thin film patterning, and microstructural characterization. Particular attention will be paid to current technologies including computer chips and memory, thin film sensors, diffusion barriers, protective coatings, and microelectromechnanical (MEMS) devices. (Also listed as 510.622/422)

EN.510.625.  Advanced Materials for Electrochemical Energy Storage.  3 Credits.  

This class provides an overview of the basic principles of electrochemical energy storage and the essential roles of advanced materials in batteries. Materials selection and design for the anodes and cathodes of lithium and sodium batteries are introduced on the basis of crystallography and materials chemistry. State-of-the-art operando characterization techniques of battery materials are also discussed in the course. This class is also listed as EN.510.425.

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.601 AND EN.510.602

EN.510.633.  Computational Materials Design.  3 Credits.  

This course will cover the use of computational methods to discover and design materials for new technologies. Topics addressed will include structure prediction, materials informatics, and the calculation of material properties from first principles using methods such as density functional theory. Participants will gain hands-on experience with modern computational techniques.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.636.  Biomaterials for Cell Engineering.  3 Credits.  

This course focuses on the development of biomaterials both as new tools to study fundamental biology and as means to direct cell behavior and function for biomedical applications. Topics include the material properties of cells and tissue, biomaterials for recapitulating cell microenvironment, biomaterials for studying and directing cell mechanotransduction, biomaterials for gene editing, biomaterials for immunotherapy, and biomaterials for neuroengineering. This course will have in-depth discussions on recent findings and publications in these areas.

EN.510.640.  Stealth Engineering.  3 Credits.  

The goal of stealth engineering is the creation of objects that are not easily detected using remote sensing techniques. To achieve this end, engineered systems of materials are arrayed to alter the signature of objects by reducing energy returned to remote observers. This course will provide an introduction to the general principles behind signature reduction by examining the mathematics and science behind basic electromagnetic and acoustic transport processes. Specific topics will include energy absorbing materials, anti-reflection coatings, wave guiding and scattering, metamaterials and adaptive screens. Co-listed with EN.510.420.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.643.  Chemistry and Physics of Polymers.  3 Credits.  

The course will describe and evaluate the synthetic routes, including condensation and addition polymerization, to macromolecules with varied constituents and properties. Factors that affect the efficiencies of the syntheses will be discussed. Properties of polymers that lead to technological applications will be covered, and the physical basis for these properties will be derived. Connections to mechanical, electronic, photonic, and biological applications will be made. Also listed as EN.510.443. Recommended Course Background: Organic Chemistry I and one semester of thermodynamics.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.657.  Materials Science of Thin Films.  3 Credits.  

The processing, structure, and properties of thin films are discussed emphasizing current areas of scientific and technological interest. Topics include elements of vacuum science and technology; chemical and physical vapor deposition processes; film growth and microstructure; chemical and microstructural characterization methods; epitaxy; mechanical properties such as internal stresses, adhesion, and strength; and technological applications such as superlattices, diffusion barriers, and protective coatings. Co-listed with EN.510.457

EN.510.661.  Chemistry of Nanomaterials.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces the fundamental principles necessary to understand the behavior of materials at length scales larger than atoms or molecules with applications in chemistry and materials science. This course will explore topics such as nanoparticle synthesis and self assembly, ordered porous materials, catalysis, nanostructured thin films, and solar energy conversion. Size dependent properties of nanomaterials will be discussed. Co-listed with EN.510.427

Area: Engineering

EN.510.665.  Transmission electron microscopy: principle and practice.  3 Credits.  

Introduction to basic principles of electron diffraction, phase contrast and Z-contrast and applications of these principles in microstructural characterization of materials by electron diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Also listed as EN.510.414.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.667.  Metal Additive Manufacturing.  3 Credits.  

Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known colloquially as 3D Printing, is a disruptive technology that has received significant attention in recent years in both the popular press and the manufacturing industry. While the current and potential future applications for this technology, especially for mission-critical metal parts, are impressive and imaginative, the full potential for metal AM has not been realized due to current limitations and a lack of full understanding of metal AM processes. In this class we will cover (1) the current state-of-the-art of AM; (2) the production steps necessary to manufacture AM parts; and (3) the closely linked topics of AM materials and AM processes. While non-metal AM materials such as polymers, composites, and ceramics will be included, the primary focus will be on metal materials fabricated with laser powder bed fusion processes. Specific topics covered will include conventional vs. AM materials, meltpool phenomena including solidification, kinetics and solid-state kinetics, post-process thermal treatments, the process-properties relationship, in-situ process sensing, indirect process measurement methods and process modeling. Recent implementations of metal additive manufacturing, such as those in the aerospace and health care industries, will be presented extensively throughout the class as study cases. Popular press articles and technical papers on AM will be reviewed and discussed. Students taking this class will be expected to participate actively and bring to the class real or potential applications of AM in their workplaces.Co-listed with EN.510.467

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.601

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.701.  Three-Dimensional Microstructural Characterization of Materials.  3 Credits.  

A graduate-level introduction to experimental techniques and data analysis for characterizing the microstructure of materials in three dimensions. Topics to be covered include serial sectioning, principles of optical and scanning-electron microscopy and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), high-energy x-ray diffraction microscopy, and techniques for 3D data reduction, representation, and analysis.

Prerequisite(s): EN.510.601 or Permission of instructor.

Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences

EN.510.801.  Materials Research Seminar.  1 Credit.  

The Graduate Research Seminar in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering provides a forum for students to present their latest research results in a formal seminar setting. The course encourages discussion between students in varying disciplines in order to establish new collaborations and develop the shared vocabulary required for interdisciplinary materials science research. Permission Required.

EN.510.802.  Materials Research Seminar.  1 Credit.  
EN.510.803.  Materials Science Seminar.  1 Credit.  

The Materials Science Seminar exposes students to a wide array of internationally recognized speakers who discuss topics of cutting-edge Materials Science research. Speakers are selected both to overlap research interests within the department and to expose students to broader trends in contemporary Materials Science.

EN.510.804.  Materials Science Seminar.  1 Credit.  
EN.510.807.  Graduate Research In Materials Science.  3 - 20 Credits.  

Individual programs of study are worked out between students and the professor supervising their independent study project. Topics selected are those not formally listed as regular courses and include a considerable design component.

EN.510.808.  Graduate Research.  3 - 20 Credits.