PH.410.600.  Fundamentals of Health, Behavior and Society.  4 Credits.  

Introduces students to a social ecological perspective of population health. Challenges students to address societal and structural forces such as socioeconomic position, racial and ethnic and gender sources of inequality as well as interpersonal processes reflected in norms, networks, and social capital. Focuses on behavior, communication, decision-making, and health outcomes at the individual, family and community level. Applies these social and behavioral perspectives to a better understanding of health problems and prepares students to develop effective public health interventions for individuals, families, communities and populations.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.601.  Emerging Tobacco Products and Regulatory Approaches.  3 Credits.  

This course provides students with an overview of tobacco product regulation, including cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, shisha, and emerging nicotine delivery systems, such as e-cigarettes and heated tobacco products. Students will explore tobacco regulatory frameworks and national policies; review past regulatory successes and emerging regulatory strategies; search industry patents to understand how product innovation is protected and presented; and study the tobacco industry’s tactics to counter tobacco regulation by critically assessing media stories.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.602.  Evaluation of Workplace Health Promotion Programs.  2 Credits.  

Provides an introduction to workplace health promotion (wellness) programs, including a practical measurement and evaluation guide. Explains the key elements of measurement: structure, process, and outcomes. Reviews rigorous techniques and principles used in applied research studies and how they can be adapted to workplace health promotion evaluations. Offers easy to implement techniques for conducting survey studies at the workplace.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.604.  Harm Reduction: A Framework for Evidence-Based Policy and Practice.  3 Credits.  

Discusses a variety of harm reduction strategies as they pertain to substance use issues. Introduces various programs that address substance use problems from a harm reduction perspective. Describes the evidence base supporting harm reduction programs. Explores the complicated legal and contextual issues associated with implementation of harm reduction programs.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.605.  Fundamental Tools for Promoting Health Equity.  3 Credits.  

Prepare DrPH students to apply health equity frameworks and measurement tools in their everyday functions; Includes four components: definitions and historical perspectives of health equity, health disparity, and social justice; common theoretical frameworks and their applications to different aspects of health equity, health disparities, and social justice; measurement tools used for health equity and health disparities in context; strategies and policies to reduce health disparities and promote health equity; Students complete a final project in which they must propose a program based in theory and proven need within their professional capacity

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.606.  Local and Global Best Practices in Health Equity Research Methods.  2 Credits.  

Introduces students to innovative methods, practical tools, and skills required to conduct evidence-based research that promotes local and global health equity. Theoretical frameworks draw on fundamental values and principles, including human rights, social justice, the value of diverse ideas and perspectives, inclusiveness, trustworthiness, behavioral and implementation science, and participatory decision-making. Includes lectures, interactive panel discussions, case-based examples, and opportunities to obtain feedback on research ideas from experienced investigators.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.607.  Introduction to the Video Production Process for Public Health Professionals.  1 Credit.  

Introduces public health professionals to the five phases of the video production process: conceptualization, script writing, pre-production (e.g., scouting locations, casting), production (e.g., shooting, voice-over), post-production (e.g., editing, graphics). Acquaints students to the fundamentals of script writing.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.608.  Applying Systems Thinking to Obesity.  2 Credits.  

Given the complexity of many public health problems, systems thinking is increasingly cited as an approach and competency needed to understand these problems. The field of obesity in particular has benefited from systems thinking, methods and modeling, however, the application of these methods remains in an inchoate stage. Students will explore various systems concepts such as leverage points, heterogeneity, complexity, adaptability, interdependence, and learn how those concepts have been applied in obesity and food system research. Students will learn which systems concepts are most useful for researching specific obesity topics and their limitations. Finally, students will explore how systems research concepts and models critically appraised and communicated with others so public health policy makers can exercise a greater degree of wisdom and insight.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.609.  The Wellness Industry and Public Health: Partners Or Adversaries in Health Promotion?.  1 Credit.  

Introduces students to the contemporary wellness industry in the US (including fitness and yoga) and explores the relevance of this industry for public health promotion. Describes core industry strategies for behavior change, and opportunities for public health evidence and research to inform industry practice. Content includes consideration of social media and the application of effective industry communication and motivation strategies for health promotion broadly defined.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.610.  Health and Homelessness.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.611.  Under Pressure: Health, Wealth & Poverty.  3 Credits.  

Explores the relationship between health, wealth, poverty, and public policy in the U.S. as well as internationally; assesses past and future strategies to remedy inequities in health and health care. Addresses theories of social class.; distribution of poverty across gender, age, and ethnic/racial groups; antipoverty programs and their effects; effects of changes in health care organization on the poor; and possible modifications to provide greater equity. Investigates how a dramatically changing media landscape influences patterns of belief about the causes of poverty and its remedies. Synthesizes scientific evidence with a variety of genres and disciplines including: history, psychology, political science, religious thought, philosophy, geography, literary theory, popular culture, film/media studies, and music.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.612.  Sociological Perspectives on Health.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.613.  Psychosocial Factors in Health and Illness.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.614.  A New View: Improving Public Health Through innovative Social and Behavioral Tools and Approaches.  4 Credits.  

Emphasizes real world integrative thinking, tools, and solutions in the pursuit of improving public health in the U.S. and internationally. Presents a global, multifaceted examination of health and illness, exploring the many factors that influence - or even determine - whether we remain healthy or become ill. Using biopsychosocial and environmental/ecological perspectives, explores the most prevalent diseases and health challenges confronting us today. Presents emerging views of health and illness being used in research, program and policy arenas. Examines factors such as socioeconomic status, ethnicity, stress, stigma, social support, coping, and politico-cultural influences through an array of contemporary issues, including: obesity, HIV/AIDS, women's health, bioterrorism, environmental public health, mental health and others. Presents innovative social and behavioral perspectives, tools and approaches.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.615.  Research Design in the Social and Behavioral Sciences.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.616.  Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health.  4 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.617.  Foundations of University Teaching and Learning.  3 Credits.  

This eight-week course will prepare participants to be effective teachers who: 1. Are knowledgeable about how learning takes place 2. Can develop and use appropriate active learning strategies in their classrooms 3. Can propose ways to make classrooms more inclusive and equitable

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.618.  Using Software in Qualitative Research and Analysis.  1 Credit.  

Introduces students to qualitative data analysis software (QDAS) programs. Discusses the functions and limitations of qualitative data analysis software. Explores how QDAS can be used throughout a qualitative research project. Explains how to use QDAS for multi-media analysis, including images, video, and audio. Demonstrates how to use QDAS to organize data, produce reports, make comparisons, detect patterns, and facilitate analysis. Demonstrates how to use QDAS in team-based research projects for data coding and analysis. Prepares students to use QDAS to develop deeper insights into their data through visualization and mapping.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.620.  Program Planning for Health Behavior Change.  3 Credits.  

Provides an overview of the breadth of programs and diversity of settings in the field of health education in health promotion, and an opportunity to develop skills in program planning. Explains the importance of health behavior as a contributor to current public health problems and the role of health education and health promotion programs in addressing them, drawing examples from the literature on community-based health education, patient education, school health, and work-site health promotion. Also discusses issues of ethical standards and quality assurance in health education and health promotion.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.625.  Injury and Violence Prevention: Behavior Change Strategies.  2 Credits.  

Expands students’ understanding of, and skills in planning, implementing, and evaluating injury and violence prevention programs. Both unintentional and intentional injuries have been the focus of a considerable body of behavioral science research and behavior change interventions. Students read and discuss selected examples of this work and enhance their skills in applying behavioral science principles and best practices to an injury or violence area of interest to them. Topics include historical overview of behavior change and the injury prevention field, as well as examples of behavior change theories, strategies, and methods that have been applied to selected injury and violence problems.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.626.  ALCOHOL, SOCIETY AND HEALTH.  3 Credits.  

Examines alcohol use and alcohol policy as social, behavioral and political phenomena. Reviews the history of alcohol policy in the United States, as well as U.S. and international epidemiological evidence regarding health harms and possible health benefits of alcohol use. Uses recent neurological research and social science research to inform the question of why people drink. Explores the evidence of effectiveness of various interventions, ranging from individual to structural, for preventing (in the case of underage and other high-risk populations) and reducing harmful use of alcohol.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.630.  Implementation and Sustainability of Community-Based Health Programs.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.631.  Introduction to Community-Based Participatory Research: Principles and Methods.  3 Credits.  

Introduces students to the fundamental principles of, rationale for, and key considerations in conducting community-based participatory research (CBPR). Offers knowledge of and skills in CBPR that emphasize the importance of community inclusion and partnership as a viable approach to constructing and increasing the acceptance of interventions and improving the health and well-being of populations. Also uses case-based learning as an approach for real world application of CBPR concepts.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.635.  Applications of innovative Methods in Health Equity Research.  2 Credits.  

Introduces students to innovative methods, practical tools, and skills required to conduct rigorous health equity research and to translate evidence-based strategies into practice and policy. Covers topics ranging from stakeholder engagement and behavioral intervention development to research methods in healthcare services and social epidemiology. Includes lectures, interactive discussions, case-based examples, and opportunities to obtain feedback on research ideas from experienced investigators.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.638.  Scientific Writing in Health Sciences: Developing A Manuscript for Publication I.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces and guides students in the writing of scientific manuscripts for publication in an area related to public health, particularly social and behavioral sciences. The goal of the course is to facilitate more effective writing of research articles using practical examples and peer feedback. Topics include: principles of good writing; tips for writing more efficiently; journal selection; co-author selection, and the anatomy of a manuscript. Students begin the course with a research question (purpose of study) and a summary of quantitative or qualitative (or mixed methods) data they would like to present in a scientific manuscript. This typically takes the form of summary tables. All analyses must be completed prior to the start of the course. Students end the course with at least two sections (e.g., methods and results) of a completed manuscript.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.639.  Scientific Writing in Health Sciences: Developing A Manuscript for Publication II.  3 Credits.  

This course guides students in the writing of scientific manuscripts for publication in an area related to social and behavioral sciences. The goal of the course is to facilitate more effective writing of research articles using practical examples and peer feedback. Topics include: completion of the manuscript; drafting a cover letter; the process of peer review; revising a manuscript; and proofs and ultimate publication. Students end the course with a completed manuscript for ready for submission to a journal for publication.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.640.  Global Tobacco Control.  3 Credits.  

Provides an introduction to global tobacco control. Presents the health and economic burden of tobacco use worldwide and highlights practical approaches to tobacco prevention, control, surveillance, and evaluation. Examines transnational tobacco control issues, including the following: the interpretation and packaging of epidemiologic evidence for policy makers, the determinants of tobacco addiction, the economics of global tobacco control, tobacco industry strategies, legal foundations for regulation, and basic surveillance and evaluation methods using lectures, case-studies, and discussion.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.641.  Implementation and Evaluation for Tobacco Control.  3 Credits.  

Studies global tobacco control methods in depth. Focuses on designing, implementing, and evaluating tobacco control interventions based on the need of a specific region or country. Highlights the use of multi-level solutions linking policy, communication, prevention, education, regulation, advocacy, and community organizing to address the interdisciplinary problem of tobacco use. Examines the aspects of tobacco use and tobacco control through lectures, case studies, presentations, and discussion.Upon successfully completing this course, students should be able to: • Perform a situational assessment of the tobacco control environment in a particular country including the health and economic burden of tobacco use in the country; • List criteria that can be used to determine the tobacco control priorities of a country, and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different criteria for setting tobacco control priorities; • Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various strategies to reduce tobacco use; •Select and define appropriate indicators for evaluating progress in implementing a tobacco control intervention; •Utilize acquired methods to plan, implement, evaluate, and lead a tobacco control interventions based on the need of a specific region or country; •Utilize acquired methods to formulate grant applications.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.642.  TOBACCO CONTROL LEADERSHIP.  2 Credits.  

Through lectures and discussion students develop an understanding of the role of the tobacco control leader, and the essential knowledge and skills this role requires. Provides a framework for understanding the process of working effectively with and leading others. Emphasizes the role of the leader in leading change and developing a vision for the future of tobacco control.Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to: • Explain the nature of organizational leadership;• Describe the requirements of effective public health and tobacco control leadership;• Apply principles and theories of leadership to current tobacco control issues and challenges;• Develop a personal philosophy and approach to the practice of leadership.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.643.  Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Tobacco Control.  3 Credits.  

Introduces students to applied research techniques used in tobacco control including direct observational studies, interviewing and focus groups, and analysis of tobacco industry documents. Guides students on the use of qualitative data collection techniques and provides examples of usage of these techniques. Introduces students to the use of the on-line databases and repositories of tobacco industry documents. Classroom sessions include lectures, discussions, and group work.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.644.  QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR TOBACCO CONTROL.  4 Credits.  

Introduces students to the quantitative methods most often used in tobacco control and tobacco-related research. Includes topics such as methods to study the determinants of tobacco use and cessation patterns, surveillance of tobacco-related indicators, interpreting burden of disease, and evaluating the impact of tobacco control interventions. Provides an opportunity to apply these new skills in interpreting and presenting quantitative data.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.645.  Applying the Social Ecological Model in Tobacco Control and Climate Change.  3 Credits.  

Compares the fields of tobacco control and climate change by describing the lessons learned from tobacco control—one of the most successful public health movements. Provides an overview of tobacco control research and advocacy approaches that form a comprehensive public health strategy and considers the use of the social ecological model to address the threats posed by climate change. Explores how both issues involve economic, social, environmental, and behavioral forces that require multi-level approaches from multiple sectors. Offers insight into industry and private sector interference that obfuscates scientific evidence, confuses the public, and stalls effective regulatory policy for both fields of study. Encourages critical comparative skills throughout to discuss how to improve public health approaches.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.650.  Introduction to Persuasive Communications: Theories and Practice.  4 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.651.  Health Literacy: Challenges and Strategies for Effective Communication.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.652.  Interpersonal Influence in Medical Care.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.653.  Contemporary Issues in Health Communication.  1 Credit.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.654.  Health Communication Programs I: Planning and Strategic Design.  4 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.655.  Health Communication Programs II: Implementation and Evaluation.  4 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.656.  Entertainment Education for Behavior Change and Development.  4 Credits.  

Examines and teaches ways in which education can be subtly but effectively worked into both new and time-honored genres of entertainment in order to foster positive behavior change and life improvement in both developing countries and local environments. Develops students’ ability to understand the ingredients of successful entertainment: emotions, empathy, efficacy and empowerment, and how these can be employed to enhance social and personal health and life skills. Examines methodology and develops skills needed to create a successful Entertainment-Education (E-E) project in entertainment (story, drama, etc.) formats with effective behavior change messages.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.657.  Communication Strategies For Sexual Risk Reduction.  3 Credits.  

Focuses on strengthening students’ understanding of sexual risk-taking and provides a solid foundation in communication strategies for sexual risk-reduction from an international perspective. The literature and examples emphasize HIV and STI risk reduction. Adopts a seminar format and consists of readings, discussions, presentations, video viewing, case studies, and critiques of literature on sexual risk-taking and protective behaviors. Includes hands-on analyses and interpretation of empirical data on sexual risk-taking and development of a communication strategy.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.658.  Health Communication Planning and Management for Behavior Change.  3 Credits.  

Provides an overview of concepts and theories in communication with a focus on health behavior change. Explains the importance of health behavior as a contributor to current public health problems and the role of behavior change communication; describes methods of communications needs assessment. Also provides the approaches, conceptual tools in planning and management of communication processes in hospitals and out-reach programs in health services, and to develop skills for effective communication with clients and other stakeholders.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.660.  Latino Health: Measures and Predictors.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.663.  Media Advocacy and Public Health: Theory and Practice.  3 Credits.  

Broadens students’ understanding of health communication to include the strategic use of the news media to support community organizing to change public health policy. Builds on theoretical and empirical work in mass communications, and uses case examples in a number of health policy areas to show how the strategies and tools of media advocacy may be applied to specific public health policy campaigns. Ample opportunities are provided for students to “practice” media advocacy, in the form of writing letters to the editor and opinion pieces, role-playing interviews, and so on. Introduces students to research literature about news media forms and practices; to framing techniques to influence news content and gain access to news channels; and to the relationship between media advocacy and other forms of health communication

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.664.  Knowledge Management for Effective Global Health Programs.  3 Credits.  

Managing and maximizing knowledge and continuous learning in global health programs is a development imperative. Global health programs operate with scarce resources, high stakes, and urgent needs for coordination among partners and donors. Knowledge management (KM) provides solutions to these challenges. Through a combination of lectures, case studies, presentations, and discussions, this course: • Introduces participants to knowledge management (KM), organizational learning (OL) and adaptive management principles, processes, and tools, and their applicability to the design and implementation of global health efforts. • Demonstrates, through real-life examples, how KM and OL can be applied to strengthen public health systems and maximize available knowledge to reach public health objectives. • Emphasizes the importance of culture and leadership as drivers for program success.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.668.  Policy Interventions for Health Behavior Change.  3 Credits.  

Examines the major theoretical frameworks (e.g., policy streams, advocacy coalition framework, punctuated equilibrium theory, ambiguity-conflict model) relevant to the development, enactment, implementation and evaluation of policy interventions that support health behavior change. Explores the roles of ideas, interests, institutions and key actors in the policy process. Discusses how the environment can be influenced to improve the chances of implementing effective interventions to improve the public’s health. Includes case studies from the areas of tobacco control, alcohol, HIV/AIDS, obesity/physical activity, and other health topics to critically explore the strengths and limitations of policy change theories as they relate to current hot topics in the area of health, behavior and society.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.671.  Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods.  3 Credits.  

Introduces students to qualitative research methods applied to the investigation of public health issues. Explores the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative research, factors that influence the utility of a qualitative approach, and ethical considerations in qualitative research. Focuses on the qualitative interview and provides an overview of the practical skills and tools required for conducting qualitative interviews and analyzing qualitative data.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.672.  Introduction to Campaigning & Organizing for Public Health.  3 Credits.  

Introduces students to a key area of knowledge in public health practice: the principles and methods of community organizing and campaigning for policy and structural change. Focuses on how to mobilize the right people at the right time, with the right demands, to change public policies to promote health. Complements other courses in the school that look at advocating within policy processes or by using the mass media by placing these strategies in the context of the practical daily work and thinking of people who plan and carry out policy change campaigns at grassroots and grasstop levels.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.673.  Introduction to Qualitative Data Analysis for Public Health.  2 Credits.  

Introduces students to the analysis of interview and focus group data collected as part of qualitative public health research. Explores distinct analytic approaches and traditions, and compares the strengths and weaknesses of different analytic paradigms for different research questions. Introduces computer software for coding and managing data using freely available online demonstration of various software packages. Presents both theoretical and practical dimensions of qualitative data analysis. Emphasizes hands-on learning activities within the classroom to practice and apply concepts learned through readings, lectures, and discussion. Develops skills to conceptualize an analytic plan for qualitative data for future research.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.675.  Critical Analysis of Popular Diets and Dietary Supplements.  3 Credits.  

Focuses on the dietary supplements and diets purporting to promote health, induce weight loss, or treat specific health concerns are widely used by Americans, which are often minimally regulated. Students apply the tools of nutritional science to a critical analysis of popular diets and supplements. Students explore the following: nutrient analysis, dissecting several example diets and supplements in class discussions, preparing a comprehensive written analysis of a specific diet or supplement of their choosing, and presenting their findings orally.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.676.  Clinical Health Behavior Change Experience in Weight Management.  2 Credits.  

Focuses on the practical application of principles from communication, behavioral, social science, and psychological theories in a clinical setting. Enables students to work directly with patients of the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center (JHWMC) to promote behavior change in the areas of diet and fitness. Integrates theoretical concepts with practical clinical applications, and presents students the opportunity to work in a team setting with healthcare practitioners.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.677.  Theory and Practice in Campaigning and Organizing for Public Health I.  4 Credits.  

Provides a practical introduction to campaigning and organizing for public health. Combines experiential learning (through participation in an actual campaign) with traditional learning (online lectures, in-class discussions and readings). Uses case studies to review the history of organizing for public health. Introduces campaign planning and management, discusses the role of research and coalition-building, and explores different types of organizing. Part of a two-term sequence that prepares students to participate in and critically assess public health campaigns to change the policies and structures that set the contexts in which people make their decisions about health.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.678.  Theory and Practice in Campaigning and Organizing for Public Health II.  4 Credits.  

Provides a practical introduction to campaigning and organizing for public health. Combines experiential learning (through participation in an actual campaign) with traditional learning (online lectures, in-class discussions and readings). Uses case studies to review the history of organizing for public health. Introduces campaign planning and management, discusses the role of research and coalition-building, and explores different types of organizing. Part of a two-term sequence that prepares students to participate in and critically assess public health campaigns to change the policies and structures that set the contexts in which people make their decisions about health.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.679.  Global Communication and Social Change.  3 Credits.  

Critically examines the intersection of theories of economic development, social change, and communication as applied to public health. Introduces the complex and dynamic role of global communication in the social determinants of health. Interrogates “development” discourses as applied to health communication in middle- and low-resource areas countries. Presents evaluations of communication interventions in low- and middle-resource nation-states. Investigates health communication endeavors abroad as well as in low-resource settings in the U.S.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.680.  Social Ecological Approaches to Health Regimen Adherence in Chronic Conditions.  3 Credits.  

Addresses social approaches to promoting sustained adherence to health regimens among persons living with chronic conditions. Addresses prescribed use of medications, lifestyle changes, and retention in healthcare over time among persons living with HIV/AIDS, hypertension, and other chronic conditions. Enables students to: (1) assess adherence to health regimens, (2) identify correlates of adherence at the individual, interpersonal, and social network levels, and (3) assess major approaches and components of medical adherence interventions, and their linkage to theories of behavior change. Explores social factors impacting vulnerable populations’ medical adherence and health disparities, drawing examples from both domestic and international contexts.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.681.  Gay, Bisexual and Other Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) and HIV: Theoretical Perspectives on the Us Epidemic.  3 Credits.  

Introduces students to key epidemiological, conceptual and historical constructs critical to understanding and responding to the HIV epidemic among gay, bisexual and other MSM in the United States. Explores the role of social and ecological factors and theoretical constructs (e.g., race and ethnicity, intersectionality and minority stress, gender and masculinity, policy and structural changes, and other social determinants) on individual and population-level experience of the HIV epidemic. Provides an in-depth understanding of the challenges to prevention and care in these constituencies through lectures, readings, small group work, and a panel discussion with community stakeholders. Provides students with an ability to develop new lines of theory, research and practice to more effectively apply a socio-ecologic framework to the HIV epidemic and better respond to HIV as a public health issue.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.682.  Integrating Children's Mental Health and Primary Care: A Social and Behavioral Science Perspective.  3 Credits.  

Examines integration of mental health and primary care as both a solution to chronic shortfalls in the provision of children's mental health services and an example of the processes involved in making change in complex systems. Frames the change process as taking place at three social-ecologic levels: how care is designed to bring about health behavior change at the client/patient/consumer level; how interventions are implemented to influence staff/clinician behavior at the organizational level; and incentives and barriers at the inter-organizational and health systems level. Uses this three-level framework to analyze a range of integration models (the medical home, collaborative and stepped care, task shifting, screening and brief intervention, and co-location of services). Uses examples largely from both ongoing programs in Maryland, Massachusetts, and Ohio with which the instructors are involved, as well as international programs.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.683.  Global Perspectives on LGBT Health.  3 Credits.  

Utilizes the socio-ecological framework to deconstruct social contexts and political power systems that contribute to LGBT health disparities across the globe. Assists in developing an appreciation for various forms of sexual and gender identities, including how cultural and religious traditions shape such identities in various regions and countries. Encourages students to recognize systemic factors that influence psychological and social development related to gender and sexuality. Introduces unique dynamics surrounding sexual orientation in family, immigration, and international human rights law.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.684.  Effective Risk Communication to Overcome Health Disparities During a Pandemic.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.686.  Advanced Quantitative Methods in The Social and Behavioral Sciences: A Practical Introduction.  4 Credits.  

Presents advanced analytic methods relevant to the social ecological model and other theoretical frameworks common in the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasizes multilevel analyses, longitudinal analyses, and propensity score methods. Introduces factor analysis, analysis of experimental studies, structural equation modeling, and complex surveys. Explores the suitability of these methods to address different research questions and study designs. Provides discussions of underlying concepts and assumptions and presents key issues in their application. Illustrates methods through critical review of published articles and by working through examples in Stata. Presents resources for continued advanced study, including methods courses offered through the school.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.690.  Ethnographic Fieldwork.  3 Credits.  

Introduces students to ethnography as a method of qualitative research (fieldwork) and a product of this research (written accounts and monographs). Introduces skills and data collection methods fundamental to ethnographic fieldwork, particularly immersion, participant observation, writing field notes, and listening. Discusses what constitutes “the field” in ethnographic fieldwork, the holistic perspective, and “thick description.” Explores key theoretical and methodological issues in contemporary ethnographic fieldwork such as ethics, positionality, reflexivity, and power. Emphasizes the role of ethnographic research in public health. Prepares students to critically assess ethnographic writing. Combines lecture, discussion, and practical skill development.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.710.  Concepts in Qualitative Research for Social and Behavioral Sciences.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.711.  Doctoral Seminar in Mixed Methods for Public Health Research.  3 Credits.  

Introduces doctoral students to emerging discussions and applications of mixed methods research in public health. Explores mixed methods as a third research paradigm that involves the utilization of both quantitative and qualitative methods within a single inquiry to enhance the researcher's abililty to understand the problem at hand. Fosters synthesis of and engaged reflection on qualitative and quantitative research training. Specific topics include: history and language of mixed methods research; relevant paradigms and epistemological debates; mixed methods design and research questions; and analysis and dissemination considerations.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.712.  Theory and Practice in Qualitative Data Analysis and Interpretation for The Social and Behavioral Sciences.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.721.  Translating Research into Public Health Programs and Policy.  3 Credits.  

Examines how behavioral research (especially intervention research) is used, and not used, by policy makers and program administrators to determine what public health services are delivered. Defines the major types of decisions made in determining services to deliver in public health programs and major decision analytic methods used to aid these selections. Types of decisions include (1) how much to invest in service for one disease area relative to another, (2) determining if an intervention is affordable for large-scale delivery, and (3) choosing how much to invest in each of several different types of services within one disease area. Methods include decision tree analysis, cost analysis, and cost-utility analysis.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.722.  Translating Research into Public Health Programs II.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.733.  Communication Network Analysis in Public Health Programs.  4 Credits.  

Introduces the theory and method of network analysis, its application to public health, emphasizing the dissemination of public health information and the transmission of disease, and the influence of networks on health-related behavior.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.752.  Children, Media, and Health.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.755.  Health Communication Programs.  4 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.800.  MPH Capstone Health, Behavior and Society.  2 Credits.  

The MPH Capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that simulates a professional practice experience.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.810.  Field Placement Health Behavior and Society.  1 - 22 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.820.  Thesis Research in Health Behavior and Society.  1 - 22 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.830.  Postdoctoral Research in Health Behavior and Society.  1 - 22 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.840.  Special Studies and Research in Health Behavior and Society.  1 - 22 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.850.  MHS Research Practicum in Health Behavior and Society.  1 - 16 Credits.  

Introduces MHS Social Factors students to hands-on social science research for public health. Provides an opportunity to work extensively with a doctorally trained research mentor. Prepares students to participate in social science research initiatives. Builds students' research knowledge and skills.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.860.  Graduate Seminar in Social and Behavioral Sciences.  2 Credits.  

Explores and debates theoretical concepts and orientations in the social and behavioral sciences and their application to public health research and practice through readings, discussion, and writing assignments.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.861.  Graduate Seminar in Community-Based Research.  1 Credit.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.863.  Doctoral Seminar in Social and Behavioral Research and Practice.  1 Credit.  

Explores and critiques social and behavioral sciences research and practice, emphasizing key constructs and methods of department faculty through presentations, readings, and group discussions.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.864.  Critical Issues in Health Disparities.  1 Credit.  

Provides an opportunity for students, postdoctoral trainees, and faculty to present scientific papers from the current and/or classic health disparities literature. Emphasizes presentation skills and the ability to critically evaluate scientific papers. Requires participants to read and discuss the assigned material.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.865.  MSPH Seminar in Health Education and Health Promotion.  1 Credit.  

Introduces a variety of topics important to the profession of health education and health promotion, including both historical and current issues. Presents role definitions and competencies, health education certification, professional organizations representing the field, and other health education and promotion resources. Prepares students for the field placement requirement in the second year of the program.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.866.  Careers in Health Education and Health Promotion.  1 Credit.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.867.  MSPH Field Placement Preparation.  1 Credit.  

Prepares students to fully understand the MSPH field placement requirements, processes, and opportunities, so that they may make the most of this professional preparation opportunity.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.868.  Program Planning for Health Behavior Change Practicum.  2 Credits.  

Explores program planning application through project-based experiential learning. Includes work in small groups to apply the PRECEDE-PROCEED needs assessment planning framework in a real world setting with a community-based organization or local government agency. Focuses on the basic methods of working with communities and community organizations, types of needs assessment tools, and the skills needed to develop these tools, through four seminar sessions and weekly sessions with community based organization representatives.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.870.  HBS Research and Proposal Writing Process for Doctoral Students I.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.871.  HBS Research and Proposal Writing Process for Doctoral Students II.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.881.  MHS Seminar in Social Factors in Health I.  1 Credit.  

Introduces students to social science concepts in public health and to ongoing social factors research at JHSPH. Also introduces students to key concepts and tools necessary to successfully complete the MHS in Social Factors in Health degree program.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.882.  MHS Seminar in Social Factors in Health II.  1 Credit.  

Provides additional skills in social science concepts for public health research. Introduces research methods for social factors research. Identifies current social factors research of interest to students.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.883.  MHS in Social Factors in Health Seminar III.  1 Credit.  

Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to: 1) Identify a range of social scientific research approaches adopted by public health agencies. 2) Identify a range of public health agencies where social science research is conducted.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.884.  MHS Seminar in Social Factors in Health IV.  1 Credit.  

Advances students' understanding of the relationship between social factors and health outcomes and experiences. Exposes students to research pertinent to social factors in health. Provides MHS students with opportunities to explore applications of public health research skills in a variety of research and practice settings.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.410.895.  MPH Practicum: Health Behavior and Society.  1 - 4 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.610.  Practical Genetic Counseling.  2 Credits.  

415.610 addresses the chromosomal basis of heredity, chromosomes and genes, tools of human molecular genetics, single gene inheritance, variation, polymorphism and mutation, genes in populations and genes in families. 415.611 presents the role of genetic counseling in health care and emphasizes the essential components of prenatal, pediatric, and adult genetics services. Indications for referral and genetics education and counseling components are illustrated using care examples. Clinical skills and tools are taught including family, medical and development history taking and pedigree construction. Additional case management skills such as the choice of laboratory and test interpretation, and issues in billing and reimbursment of genetic counseling services are addressed. 415.612 -613 expand on the previous two courses to examine the Hemoglobinapathics and Thalassemias as models of molecular pathology, the molecular/biochemical basis of genetic disease, genetics of cancer, gene mapping

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.611.  Introduction to Human Genetics I.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.612.  Introduction to Human Genetics II.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.613.  Introduction to Medical Genetics I.  2 Credits.  

Provides a foundation in medical genetics. Focuses on teaching genetic disorders using a systems approach. Presents an overview of the disease process and differential diagnosis of related genetic disorders. Includes the following topics: birth defects/embryology, prenatal diagnosis, pulmonary disorders, muscle diseases, hemoglobinopathies, ocular diseases, kidney disorders, craniosynostoses, skin disorders, deafness, because knowledge of the genetic contribution to disorders within these categories is critical to the work of genetic counselors and medical geneticists. Prepares students for the board certification exam given by the American Board of Genetic Counseling upon completion of the ScM in genetic counseling.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.614.  Introduction to Medical Genetics II.  2 Credits.  

Builds upon the material in 415.613, and emphasizes other organ systems. Includes a patient panel where individuals discuss the impact of a genetic disorder on their lives and the lives of their family. Includes the following topics: neurogenetics, cardiac defects, cancer genetics, orofacial clefting, genitourinary disorders, skeletal dysplasias, connective tissue disorders because knowledge of the genetic contribution to disorders within these categories is critical to the work of genetic counselors and medical geneticists. Prepares students for the board certification exam given by the American Board of Genetic Counseling upon completion of the ScM in genetic counseling.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.619.  New Genetic Technologies and Public Policy.  3 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.620.  Introduction to Genetic Counseling I.  2 Credits.  

Compares definitions of genetic counseling (GC) with objectives and service outcomes. Explores counselor values as they relate to roles and responsibilities toward clients. Introduces ethical and policy issues specific to GC in conjunction with a research agenda. Discusses and practices basic tools, including interviewing, history gathering, and case assessment, and nondirective counseling approaches.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.621.  Introduction to Genetic Counseling II.  2 Credits.  

Compares definitions of genetic counseling (GC) with objectives and service outcomes. Explores counselor values as they relate to roles and responsibilities toward clients. Introduces ethical and policy issues specific to GC in conjunction with a research agenda. Discusses and practices basic tools, including interviewing, history gathering, and case assessment, and nondirective counseling approaches.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.624.  Ethical, Legal and Social Implications in Genetics and Genomics Over Time.  3 Credits.  

Examines the ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) of human genetics and genomics through the lens of significant and field-defining periods and events in the history of the field. Examines the ELSI raised by those events, and how the events have shaped and defined the current state of the science and emerging scientific, ethical, policy and public health issues.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.630.  Therapeutic Genetic Counseling I.  2 Credits.  

Equips graduate students enrolled in the JHU/NHGRI Genetic Counseling Program with an applied psychological paradigm for genetic counseling. Defines and illustrates goals and the process of genetic counseling. Teaches students skills to assess clients' cognitive and affective responses to the genetic contribution to disease and risk. Defines components of a therapeutic relationship. Allows opportunities to practice establishing and acting on a therapeutic relationship.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.631.  Therapeutic Genetic Counseling II.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.640.  Health Judgment and Decision Making.  2 Credits.  

Provides a foundation in cognitive, emotional, and motivational processes underlying judgment and decision making in a variety of health contexts. Focuses on antecedents and consequences of adaptive and maladaptive health judgments and decisions, with particular attention to risk perception and communication, application of decisional heuristics, and personal beliefs underlying health decisions. Considers how people make decisions, how they respond to health information, and how they mentally represent illness, as well as how health teams make decisions. Prepares students to apply basic research on health judgment and decision-making to effective genetic counseling and other applied settings.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.650.  Facilitating Family Adaptation to Loss and Disability I.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.651.  Facilitating Family Adaptation to Loss and Disability II.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.675.  Cancer Genetics: Managing the Risks Through Testing and Counseling.  2 Credits.  

Equips graduate students enrolled in the JHU/NHGRI genetic counseling program with principles of genetic components to common diseases, using cancer as the example for this course. Introduces key concepts throughout the course through case-based learning.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.701.  Genetic Counseling Lab I.  2 Credits.  

Explores interactive genetic counseling interventions as they apply to specific clinical settings and client needs. Presents key issues in client education for various medical specialties, and identifies research needs related to genetic counseling. Examines counseling issues through the use of role-plays.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.702.  Genetic Counseling Lab II.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.710.  Medical Genetics and Genomic Medicine: from Diagnosis to Treatment I.  2 Credits.  

Examines advances in the diagnosis of genetic disorders and treatments that result from genomic medicine. Focuses on examples from multiple malformation syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, deletion/duplication syndromes, and Ras-opathies.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.711.  Medical Genetics and Genomic Medicine: from Diagnosis to Treatment II.  2 Credits.  

Examines advances in the diagnois of genetic disorders and treatments that result with a focus on neurocutaneous syndromes, muscular dystrophies, connective tissue disorders and ciliopathies. Both terms aim to prepare students for the board certification exam given by the American Board of Genetic Counseling upon completion of the ScM in genetic counseling.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.820.  Thesis Research: Genetic Counseling.  1 - 22 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.840.  SS/R: Genetic Counseling.  1 - 22 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.851.  Supervised Clinical Rotations: Genetic Counseling.  2 - 4 Credits.  

Clinical placements in adult, pediatric, and prenatal genetic centers in the Baltimore-Washington area provide opportunity to learn about genetic conditions by their impact on individuals and their families, and about roles of the genetic counselor. Individual rotations are scheduled to achieve a wide range of clinical experiences.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.861.  Genetic Counseling Seminar: Topics in the Field.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.866.  Current Topics in Molecular Genetics I.  1 Credit.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.867.  Current Topics in Molecular Genetics II.  1 Credit.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.870.  Genetic Counseling Clinical Supervision.  1 Credit.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.880.  Genetic Counseling Program Thesis Proposal Development I.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.881.  Genetic Counseling Program Thesis Proposal Development II.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.415.882.  Genetic Counseling Program Thesis Proposal Development III.  2 Credits.  

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.