PH.700.600.  Basics of Bioethics.  2 Credits.  

Offers an introduction to fundamental issues and approaches in bioethics, provides an overview of the history of the field, and highlights the events that led to the birth and growth of bioethics. Introduces theoretical approaches to bioethics, public health policy, research ethics, ethics of genetics and science, and clinical ethics. Provides students with opportunities to gain from the experience of some of the most respected scholars in the field of bioethics.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.601.  Foundations of Bioethics.  3 Credits.  

Offers an introduction to central approaches and issues in bioethics. Includes a discussion of the history of the field and the issues that led to its birth and growth internationally. Introduces philosophical, empirical and non-empirical approaches to bioethics and core ethical issues in clinical care, public health, science and research. Provides a foundation for future study in bioethics.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.602.  Hot Topics in Bioethics.  3 Credits.  

Offers a continuation of the exploration of ethical theory and its use in bioethics begun in "Introduction to Ethical Theory". Utilizes the conceptual and methodological tools from "Ethical Theory" in analyzing topics and cases currently being discussed in bioethics. Although topics will change from year to year, common themes include: discussion of legal changes concerning end of life; the ethics of new reproductive technologies; ethical challenges concerning genome-editing technologies; and global ethical challenges such as climate change and resource allocation.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.603.  Introduction to Ethical Theory.  3 Credits.  

Explores the relationship between philosophical ethical theory and the practical world of bioethics. In particular, examines the classical accounts of moral obligation and virtue in the context of a variety of contemporary bioethical problems. Further presents the distinction between individual bioethics and collective bioethics, with the goal of determining how the theoretical grounding for these fields differ. The motivating questions are both methodological and substantive: First, how does theory contribute to bioethical investigations? And second, does reflection on ethical theory tell us what to do concerning particular, bioethical problems?

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.604.  Methods in Bioethics.  3 Credits.  

This course introduces some of the main methods used in bioethics research, scholarship and practice, including philosophical, legal, historical, religious, qualitative, and quantitative research methods. The strengths and weaknesses of each method in addressing bioethical questions or problems will be described. Each method will be illustrated with contemporary topical examples. In addition, one cross-cutting example of an issue addressed by all methods will be discussed.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.605.  Critical Reasoning for Bioethics.  2 Credits.  

Introduces critical thinking skills that are widely used in bioethics research and practice. Introduces argument mapping techniques and gives students practice extracting arguments from texts and mapping those arguments. Introduces students to common strengths and weaknesses of arguments and gives students practice in evaluating arguments.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.606.  Critical Reasoning for Bioethics II.  2 Credits.  

This course builds on Critical Thinking in Bioethics Scholarship 1. It builds on student training in argument mapping, identifying common strengths and weaknesses of arguments and evaluating arguments, formulating good arguments and expressing them in text, and writing critical essays.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.621.  Ethics in Clinical Practice: Fundamentals, Problems and Approaches.  3 Credits.  

Offers students a) a theoretical and practical foundation for identifying and analyzing ethical issues arising in clinical medicine and b) a survey of important current issues and problems in clinical ethics with c) a focus on case analysis and application of principles to problems. Includes interactive content and case-based materials.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.622.  Bioethics, Human Rights, and Global Health.  3 Credits.  

Explores the theoretical justifications of human rights and their relationship to the contemporary human rights movement based in positive law and how human rights are operationalized. Reviews theories of human rights, evolution of human rights as law, and common ground and tensions between bioethics and legal approaches to human rights. Illustrates how bioethics and human rights concepts apply to key public health issues of our time, particularly as they relate to problems of inequality and inequity. Discuss issues including access to essential medicines, women’s health, disease surveillance and response to pandemics, and health claims of immigrants, refugees and prisoners.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.623.  ETHICS AND DECISION-MAKING IN CLINICAL PRACTICE.  3 Credits.  

Acquaints students with the ethical dimensions of healthcare decision-making by individuals, including shared decision-making in patient-provider encounters; decision-making in the context of incomplete information, patient disadvantage, distress or conflict; the understanding and approach of providers and systems to the ethical dimensions of decision-making; and relevant social and economic constraints on such decision-making. Explores topics in multiple settings, populations and health conditions, with the goal of making learners aware of the ethical implications of healthcare decisions, both in everyday practice and from a policy perspective.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.625.  Bioethics and the Law.  3 Credits.  

Examines central legal cases that address issues in bioethics. Topics covered include reproductive rights, end of life decision-making, informed consent, ownership of human cells, and others. Explores challenges that emerging biotechnologies (e.g., neuroimaging) pose for existing legal doctrine. Discusses evolving regulatory frameworks for oversight of human subjects research. Considers the relationship between legal reasoning and ethical reasoning, with some of the legal literature supplemented by readings from the bioethics literature.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.630.  Global Food Ethics.  3 Credits.  

Introduces and explores the ethical issues of the global food system. Provides students with the opportunity to think critically about a variety of conflicting views as to what it means to produce, process, distribute, market and consume food ethically in a globalized world. Borrows tools from practical ethics, political philosophy, and theories of justice to shed light on these issues that determine our common future and the way we personally and socially relate to the food we eat.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.632.  Ethics, Policy, and Emerging Biomedical Technologies.  3 Credits.  

Examines the ethics and policy issues raised by emerging biomedical technologies, including stem cell science, genetics/genomics, neuroscience, and synthetic biology. Integrates primers on the relevant science with discussion of the ethics and policy issues raised by the design, conduct and integration of the science into research, clinical care and commerce.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.640.  NUTRITION ETHICS AND POLICY: UNDERSTANDING THE ETHICAL ISSUES OF NUTRITION SCIENCE, POLITICS AND PRACTICE.  3 Credits.  

Introduces and explores the ethical issues of the nutritional sciences field in science, policy and practice. Provides students with the opportunity to think critically about a variety of conflicting evidence and scientific views of what is considered a “good” diet, where are the social inequities in accessing a nutritious diet, and what are the implications of policies in achieving nutrition security. Borrows tools from practical ethics, political philosophy, and theories of justice to highlight key ethical issues and challenges that impede or incentivize progress in the field of nutrition.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.641.  Germs, Genes, Patients, and Populations.  3 Credits.  

This course explores past, present, and future ethical, legal, social and policy issues at the intersection of infectious disease and genomics. Because of the inherently social nature of contagion, infectious disease challenges individualistic assumptions in bioethical models with public health dilemmas requiring attention to the relationships and interactions between hosts, vectors, pathogens, and environments. The course focuses on the potential ethical, legal, and social implications of emerging genomic science and technology for infectious disease control, including cutting-edge scientific topics like personalized vaccines, gene editing, and HIV phylogenetics. The course also addresses enduring bioethical concerns about social responsibility, stigma, and the challenge of balancing individual interests and protections against risks of harms to others and to public health.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.642.  Vulnerability in Childhood -- from Ethics to Advocacy.  3 Credits.  

Introduces students to the concept of vulnerability from an interdisciplinary lens of ethics, philosophy, medicine, and public health. Discusses how special protections for vulnerable populations can impact research and clinical care at the individual and population level. Presents examples of vulnerable populations of children (eg. children with medical complexity, children in foster care, children at the border, children impacted by the opioid epidemic, transgender youth) in order to illustrate relevant ethical challenges faced by vulnerable populations. Introduces students to written media (eg. op-ed, letter to the editor) as a tool to advocate for vulnerable children.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.643.  Understanding Addiction: Philosophy, Science, Ethics.  3 Credits.  

Addiction is a devastating condition that touches many of our lives. Yet our capacity to adequately respond is all too often hampered by failures to understand its complexity and heterogeneity. This course uses an inter-disciplinary approach to better understand the nature of drug use, addiction, and addicted decision-making, by integrating perspectives from philosophy, the social, psychological, and brain sciences, clinical practice, and the voices of people who struggle with addiction themselves. Topics to be explored include: the pros and cons of disease and choice models; animal models of addiction; social and psychological factors; cultural attitudes towards drugs; rationality and irrationality; craving; self-identity; responsibility, blame and stigma. Students will have the opportunity to develop analytic reasoning skills, enabling critical reflection and ethical engagement with these complex issues.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.644.  Justice Theory and Health.  3 Credits.  

Many of us are attracted to public health because of a desire to make the world not only a better place, but also a more just one. But what does that mean- explore that question from the standpoint of human rights and justice theory. Topics include the distinctive role of justice and structural justice in moral thought, theoretical foundations for human rights, the relationship between human rights and justice, and the related concepts of fairness, power and disadvantage.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.645.  Fogarty Bioethics Fellows Seminar.  1 Credit.  

Provides a small, interactive setting for discussion of research ethics, ethics committees, and ethics concepts among the trainees and between trainees and affiliated faculty. Sessions are divided among the following activities: reviewing and critiquing journal articles related to research ethics; trainees’ individual presentations on practicum research progress; guest speakers related to research ethics cases and/or concepts; and development and presentation of original case studies by each trainee. Topics include standard of care, justice, inducements, research ethics committees, informed consent, and gender roles in research decisions.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.663.  Global Food Ethics and Policy.  2 Credits.  

Examines global food systems and the policies that impact global food security, and broader aspects of sustainable development including public health, the environment and economies. Presents and critiques different food system policies that determine the availability, affordability, and nutritional quality of the food supply and influence the amount and combination of foods that people are willing and able to consume. Encourages use of critical thinking skills and debate to understand how policy and science interact with regard to food systems. Presents data, case studies and real-time challenges related to global food systems with an emphasis on the development of practical skills to analyze systems approaches.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.665.  Introduction to Ethics of U.S. and International Human Subject Research.  2 Credits.  

Provides an introduction to the ethics of human subject research and allows participants to apply what they learn to case examples from the U.S. and international settings. Presents ethical principles and a framework for analysis. Reviews key U.S. and international regulations that guide the ethical conduct of research. Through lectures and moderated discussions, addresses a variety of issues including: informed consent for research participation; ethical aspects of study design; just selection of research subjects and duties of justice when working in resource poor settings; and the role and function of institutional review boards/ethics review committees. Uses case discussions to explore research in both domestic and international settings.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.701.  SEX, DRUGS, AND BIOETHICS.  2 Credits.  

Explores sex and drugs as key themes in the debates over the moral purpose of medicine. Examines ethical issues arising from uses of medical technologies in non-healing, contested, and illicit contexts. Includes topics such as sexual surgery, sex selection, human enhancement, sports doping, and recreational drug use. Encourages critical analysis and discussion of what medicine is for.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.702.  THE ETHICS OF MAKING BABIES.  2 Credits.  

Examines one of the most morally significant decisions people face: whether or not to create a new person. Explores our pronatal outlook—a positive moral outlook on the activity of making babies. Considers why it is uncomfortable, and perhaps even threatening, to suggest that procreation is an activity that is subject to a whole variety of moral requirements. Engages students in asking and beginning to answer the question, is it permissible to create a new child.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.801.  Bioethics Program Thesis Seminar.  3 Credits.  

Provides students with the basic research and organizational skills needed for successful completion of the MBE thesis. Addresses skills needed to conduct a literature review, choose an appropriate topic, and construct a rigorous argument.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.820.  Bioethics Program Thesis Research.  1 - 6 Credits.  

Provides an opportunity for students to actively conduct research in bioethics.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.840.  Bioethics Program Independent Study.  2 Credits.  

Provides students with a one-on-one independent study experience in which they independently review papers from the current literature and meet weekly with a departmental faculty member to discuss them. Offers opportunities for complementary activities which may include participating in related course discussions, seminars, conferences, etc. Culminates with the completion of a written document, typically a substantial paper.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.700.895.  Bioethics Program Practicum.  3 Credits.  

The MBE Practicum is a mentored, bioethics experience, which involves either field work with a practicing bioethicist, or applying one's bioethical training to a real-world environment.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.