PH.600.601.  Seminars in Public Health.  2 Credits.  

Introduces the basic principles of the practice of public health at the local, regional, national, and international levels. Uncovers relevant public health topics through a combination of presentations by experts, discussions, and lectures. Focuses on the core competencies required for the effective assessment and improvement of the health and well-being of communities. Explores the public health approach to describing the health of a population, including the importance of understanding the social and cultural context surrounding every community. Covers a broad spectrum of population-based, prevention-oriented issues relevant to public health in the private and public sectors of both domestic and international communities, including global health promotion, disease prevention, health care delivery systems, environmental issues, and the spectrum of factors influencing the health status of populations and communities.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.600.602.  Seminars in Public Health: Advanced Topics.  2 Credits.  

Expands upon the 1st term of Seminars in Public Health to focus on how to effect public health change. Uses a combination of expert presentations and engaging discussions to explore topics including identification of key stakeholders, acknowledging competing governance priorities, and gathering support for population-level interventions. Explores the dissemination of public health messages, understanding key aspects of speaking to a range of stakeholder audiences and utilizing available communication tools. Focuses on examples of successful advocacy for change, and key lessons learned. Encourages students to utilize the public health approach discussed over the two terms to refine their future career goals.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.600.611.  Professional Development Workshops: Effective online Searching.  2 Credits.  

Introduces and explores online sources for finding high-quality, full-text research articles. Also prepares students to use advanced search techniques efficiently within these sources and to manage references using tools such as RefWorks, EndNote, Zotero and Mendeley. Finally, students learn about tools available to use to stay current on topics related to the public health field.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.600.612.  Professional Development: Writing for Results.  2 Credits.  

Professional Development: Writing for Results: Introduces a systematic approach to writing— from planning and organization to revision and completion. Emphasizes the importance of defining the message and understanding the audience and purpose. Examines the basic elements of good writing. Focuses on clarity, concision and style. Explores the use of rhetoric and storytelling to maximize a piece of writing's impact. Emphasizes best practices in various forms of writing, including emails, memos, reports, proposals and op-eds.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.600.701.  Introduction to Epidemiology.  4 Credits.  

Introduces principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation of diseases. Illustrates methods by which studies of the distribution and transmission of diseases in populations (including disease outbreaks and epidemics) can contribute to an understanding of etiologic factors and modes of transmission. Covers various study designs, including randomized trials, case-control and cohort studies, as well as risk estimation and causal inference. Discusses applications of epidemiology to solving public health problems, such as identifying sources and strategies for control of disease outbreaks, applying research findings to policy and practice, and program evaluation. Explores quantitative and analytic methods including life tables, disease surveillance, measures of morbidity and mortality, and measures of diagnostic test accuracy.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.600.702.  Intermediate Epidemiology.  4 Credits.  

Expands knowledge beyond introductory level epidemiologic concepts and methods material using examples from the published literature. Emphasizes interpretation and the ability to critically evaluate issues related to populations/study design, measurement, population comparisons and inference, including modern cohort study designs; advanced nested designs; novel techniques for exposure assessment; interpretation and utility of measures of impact; sources of bias and methods for their prevention; descriptive and analytical goals for observational study inference; the counterfactual model for defining exchangeability, cause, and confounding; and synthesis of inferences from observational studies as compared with randomized clinical trials.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.600.709.  Statistical Concepts in Public Health 1.  3 Credits.  

Provides students with a broad overview of Biostatistical methods and concepts used in the public health sciences. Emphasizes the interpretation and conceptual foundations of statistical estimation and inference. Covers summary measures, measures of association, confidence intervals, p-values, and statistical power.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.600.710.  Statistical Concepts in Public Health 2.  3 Credits.  

Provides a broad overview of biostatistical methods and concepts used in the public health sciences, emphasizing interpretation and concepts rather than calculations or mathematical details. Develops ability to read the scientific literature to critically evaluate study designs and methods of data analysis. Introduces basic concepts of statistical inference, including hypothesis testing, p-values, and confidence intervals. Topics include comparisons of means and proportions; the normal distribution; regression and correlation; confounding; concepts of study design, including randomization, sample size, and power considerations; logistic regression; and an overview of some methods in survival analysis. Draws examples of the use and abuse of statistical methods from the current biomedical literature.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.600.711.  Public Health Statistics I.  4 Credits.  

Provides students with a broad overview of Biostatistical methods and concepts used in the public health sciences. Emphasizes the interpretation and conceptual foundations of statistical estimation and inference. Covers summary measures, measures of association, confidence intervals, p-values, and statistical power. The software package R will be incorporated into the course learning experiences, and students will be able to use R for a portion of each of the four class homework assignments.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.600.712.  Public Health Statistics II.  4 Credits.  

Employs a conceptual framework to highlight the similarities and differences between linear, logistic and Cox Proportional Hazards methods, in terms of usage and the interpretations of results from such models. Provides details for these regression approaches in the “simple” scenario, involving relating an outcome to single predictor. Following this overview of simple regression, explores the use of multiple regression models to compare and contrast confounding and effect modification, produce adjusted and stratum-specific estimates, and allow for better prediction of an outcome via the use of multiple predictors. Offers a brief introduction to linear spline models and propensity score methods for adjustment. T

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.601.731.  Spatial Analysis for Public Health.  4 Credits.  

Introduces the field of spatial analysis for public health. Examines concepts through the use of ArcGIS Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping software as a tool for integrating, manipulating, and displaying public health related spatial data. Covers GIS topics including mapping, geocoding, and manipulations related to data structures and topology. Introduces the spatial science paradigm: Spatial Data, GIS, and Spatial Statistics and uses selected case studies to demonstrate concepts along the paradigm. Focuses on using GIS to generate and refine hypotheses about public health related spatial data in preparation for follow up analyses.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.601.732.  Spatial Data Technologies for Mapping.  4 Credits.  

Examines technologies for collecting, obtaining and creating spatial data. Considers technologies including GPS, tablets, tracking devices, cell phones, mHealth, Google Earth, remote sensing applications, and the Internet. Integrates spatial data from the aforementioned technologies into ArcGIS for spatial analysis. Introduces other GIS related software applications such as QGIS, ERDAS, and R. Explores relevant properties of spatial data such as metadata, confidentiality/disclosure and spatial data accuracy. Covers additional topics and concepts that reinforce the spatial science paradigm: Spatial Data, GIS, and Spatial Statistics.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.601.733.  Applied Spatial Statistics.  4 Credits.  

Introduces statistical techniques used to model, analyze, and interpret public health related spatial data. Casts analysis of spatially dependent data into a general framework based on regression methodology. Covers the geostatistical techniques of kriging and variogram analysis, point process methods for spatial event and case control data, and area-level analysis. Focuses on statistical modeling and topics relating to clustering and cluster detection of health related events. Provides an introduction to the public domain statistical software R, to be used for analysis. Reinforces skills and concepts related to the spatial science paradigm: Spatial Data, GIS, and Spatial Statistics.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.601.734.  Spatial Applications.  4 Credits.  

Focuses on further developing and integrating components of the spatial science paradigm: Spatial Data, GIS and Spatial Statistics. Provides an opportunity for students to gain a working knowledge of resources for conducting spatial analysis (e.g., literature, software, and data). Expands students’ abilities to design and conduct spatial analysis by providing data for reproduction, and in some cases, extension of analyses from existing studies.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.601.805.  Spatial Analysis Journal Club.  2 Credits.  

This course will involve reading and critically evaluating the application and interpretation of spatial statistical methodology in published public health literature. Focus will be on understanding how the epidemiological/public health objectives translate into spatial statistical analyses. Literature reviews will also include outlines detailing spatial statistical methods and analyses that can be applied as an extended and/or alternative analysis.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.601.880.  Spatial Analysis integrative Activity.  4 Credits.  

This course will involve the research, analysis and writing of a complete and independent spatial analysis project. Intermediate outlines, hypotheses and objectives produced in previous classes will be finalized. No new material will be covered. The finalized project will follow journal article format including an abstract, and introduction/background, methods, results and conclusion sections. The final project will represent an integrated and synthesized assessment of the spatial science paradigm (Spatial Data, GIS, Spatial Statistics) applied to a relevant public health problem.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.601.931.  Spatial Analysis Lab 1.  2 Credits.  

Expands on GIS concepts and skills previously learned with more hands-on practice with epidemiological applications. Focuses on translating an epidemiological problem or getting into a set of spatial objectives that align with our spatial science paradigm. Surveys and summarizes the literature on spatial applications in public health. Prepares students to design a protocol to help identify a public health problem and accompanying data for their MAS Integrative Activity.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.601.932.  Spatial Analysis Lab 2.  2 Credits.  

Applies spatial concepts and skills towards identifying a public health project that can be the focus of the MAS Integrative Activity. Prepares students to translate projects into a set of spatial objectives that align with the spatial science paradigm. Details out the mechanisms and processes needed for collecting, creating and/or obtaining necessary supporting data for the chosen project.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.631.  Essentials of Population Health Management.  3 Credits.  

Population health refers to outcomes for a group of individuals. Acquaints students with key concepts related to maintaining the health and wellness of populations. Examines the importance of determinants of health, including medical care, public health, genetics, personal behaviors and lifestyle, and a broad range of social, environmental, and economic factors. Explores this broad view of the determinants of population health and its impact on organizations that may not think of themselves as being in the business of health, such as housing organizations, employers, schools, and others who make decisions and create environments that can help or hinder good health. Population health management (PHM) has emerged as an important strategy for healthcare providers and payers. This course examines the challenges and opportunities to improving health within and across populations, as well as models of value-driven accountable care.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.651.  Principles and Applications of Advanced Payment Models in Population Health Management.  3 Credits.  

Presents an overview of major issues related to the design, function, management, regulation, and evaluation of health insurance and managed care plans and implications for population health management. Provides a firm foundation in basic concepts pertaining to private and public sector health insurance/benefit plans. Key topics include population care delivery and payment innovations and management techniques, provider payment models, risk-sharing and other incentives for organizational integration, quality and accountability, cost-containment. Innovative payment models and initiatives supporting health care providers and health care organizations in testing alternative care delivery and payment models are reviewed in the context of three core strategies for improving the US health system: improving the way health care providers are paid, improving the way care is delivered, and increasing the availability of information to guide decision-making.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.671.  Collective Impact: Developing and Leading Community Partnerships to Improve Population Health.  3 Credits.  

Identifies the elements necessary to create a culture of collaboration. Following deliberate, evidence-based methods, evaluates components of cultural transformation. Examines strategies related to building infrastructure for collaboration, including application of the Collective Impact Framework.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.681.  Applications in Accountable Care: Assessing Quality and Effectiveness of Population Health initiatives.  3 Credits.  

This course examines approaches by health plans, employers, and providers to evaluate population health management initiatives, define and measure quality from a population perspective, and assess the impact of Delivery System Reform and multi-payer alignment on outcomes examine new approaches to outcome and cost measurement. By focusing on the role of value measurement as part of a strategic agenda to transform quality and costs, participants will learn how to enable systematic improvement in the care delivery process.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.691.  Managing Health Across the Continuum: Contemporary Models and Applications of Care Coordination and Management.  3 Credits.  

Understanding gained from the evolution of care management models has prompted the need for a more comprehensive approach to managing the health of populations. The continuum of care refers to the concept of managing individuals with various levels and intensity of health services from prevention to chronic disease management and end of life care. In order to manage health across the "community" continuum, health management strategies need to align with data collected from Community Health Needs Assessments and other sources to target identified health risks across the continuum. This course incorporates concepts from various models (e.g. Triple Aim) and provides a framework to transform care delivery. It examines the concepts and strategies of care management, analyzes strategies aimed at primary and secondary prevention, and evaluates models and efforts to expand care management accountability into the community.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.701.  Applied Concepts and Foundations of High Performance for Population Health.  3 Credits.  

This course will provide students with an understanding of the core features, characteristics, values, culture and systems that lead to high performance for population health. It will introduce students to evidence based approaches such as the Baldrige framework that allow organizations to address performance gaps and develop robust processes and a culture of continuous improvement and excellence to improve the health of populations. The course will utilize a case study approach to share best practices within population health that lead to sustained high performance.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.711.  Health Behavior: Improving Health Through Health Education/Promotion.  3 Credits.  

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the field of health education/health promotion and an opportunity to develop skills in needs assessment and program planning. We will review the importance of health behavior as a contributor to current public health problems, as well as the role of health education and health promotion in addressing these problems. Students will learn how to use planning frameworks (PRECEDE/PROCEED and Social Marketing) for conducting needs assessments and designing health promotion programs. Theories of health behavior change will be introduced and their applications to health behavior change interventions described. Examples of health education and health promotion programs from health care and community settings will be presented.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.721.  Organizing for Public Health: A Systems Approach.  2 Credits.  

Systems thinking, (ST), is a holistic approach to analyzing how components of complex systems interact and adapt. Through systems thinking we can understand how societies organize themselves to achieve collective health goals and how different actors contribute to policy outcomes. Provides students with an understanding of how to apply ST in public health. Trains students on the fundamentals of ST theory and offers an opportunity to apply key methods and approaches to health policy and health questions. Prepares students to ask relevant research questions and apply a ST lens to describe, understand, and anticipate complex behavior. Examines how systems models can be critically appraised and communicated with others so public health policy makers can exercise a greater degree of wisdom and insight.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.731.  Population and Consumer Health Informatics.  3 Credits.  

Introduces students to concepts, methods, and issues related to the application of health information technology (HIT) to population health. Emphasizes the population health potential of comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs), personal health records (PHRs), mobile health and telemedicine devices; and, consumer focused internet-based tools. Covers the uses of HIT to define and identify populations and sub-populations of interest, and describe the health status and needs of populations. Emphasizes the use of HIT within both local, regional and federal public health agencies and population-based private health care organizations such as integrated delivery systems and health insurance plans. Lessons are mainly U.S. oriented but are also applicable to other high and middle income countries.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.741.  Behavioral Economics and Risk: Value-Based Payment Methods and incentives.  4 Credits.  

Provides students with tools from mainstream and behavioral economics that can be used for managing population health. Demonstrates the value – and limitations – of these approaches for influencing the decision-making of providers and the health behaviors of individuals, with particular attention to value-based payment methods and incentives. Examines the influence of payment design on provider and patient behaviors and applies concepts of behavioral economics to evaluate and propose essential elements of effective payment models and incentives designed to improve health and reduce costs. Draws on articles from the popular press and professional journals that illustrate how these approaches have been applied in experimental and real situations.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.751.  The Built Environment: Influences and Challenges to Improving Population Health.  3 Credits.  

Focuses on describing the relations between the urban and suburban built environments in the U.S., with emphasis on land use and transportation infrastructure, access to healthy food, access to green space and recreational opportunities, and exposures to air pollution and noise that accompany these community designs all of which have been shown to have an impact on community health. Explores the use of Health Impact Assessments for assessing the programs and policies that do not traditionally evaluate public health outcomes.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.761.  Value-Based Concepts of Socially-Responsible Leadership.  3 Credits.  

Focuses on the essential principles of personal and interpersonal leadership that can be used in and across organizational settings to enhance performance, align and empower relevant stakeholders, and assure multisector organizational engagement. Provides students with opportunities to learn and apply leadership skills in a manner that encourages them to challenge their own beliefs and assumptions about what constitutes leadership. Offers a comprehensive review of contemporary issues and perspectives on leadership including multidisciplinary and systems-oriented approaches as well as classic leadership theory and evolving contemporary beliefs.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.602.880.  Population Health Management integrative Activity.  4 Credits.  

This course will involve the research, analysis, and writing of a complete and independent population health management strategy. This activity requires students to draw upon the relevant evidence-based concepts of population health and population health management provided through the curriculum. No new material will be covered. The finalized project will be in the format of a consulting report to senior leadership and contain an executive summary in addition to, introduction, background, assessment and analysis, findings, and recommendation sections. The final project paper will represent an integrated and synthesized assessment of population health management paradigm of Know-Engage-Manage as applied to a defined community.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.603.651.  Case Studies in Quality and Patient Safety.  2 Credits.  

• Provides an understanding of the approaches undertaken by US and international health care organizations (HCOs) to institute quality and patient safety initiatives in patient care • Explores the extent, relevance and impact of the HCO's structure and strategy on quality and patient safety functions, • Introduces the Baldrige Performance Excellence framework to assess the quality and patient safety functions, • Describes the quality and safety domains using case studies of different HCOs in the US and international settings, • Emphasizes how the internal HCO culture and external HCO environment serve as facilitators or barriers for implementing quality and patient safety initiatives, and • Highlights key HCO roles senior- and middle-level management play both at the institutional and departmental levels to enable effective practical implementation of quality and patient safety initiatives, including resource allocation.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.603.701.  Introduction to Quality of Care for Practitioners.  4 Credits.  

Introduces quality issues, including quality assessment and assurance performed by clinicians, health systems, professional societies, and government and other third party organizations who pay for care. Provides a basis to evaluate the effectiveness of quality assessment and assurance activities. Describes different approaches to quality improvement and evaluation.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.603.702.  Quality Improvement Tools.  3 Credits.  

Describes, demonstrates and trains in the use of key tools used at leading institutions to improve quality of care and patient safety. These will include the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP), Plan Do Study Act (PDSA), Translating Research into Practice (TRiP), Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS), Lean Six Sigma, Management Discussion & Analysis (MD&A), Safer Matrix, briefings, debriefings and TeamSTEPPS©. Presents a framework and strategies for the successful implementation of quality improvement interventions, including specific approaches, methods, structures and resources to promote uptake of the components of an intervention. Learners will gain first hand experience through role playing, individual and group exercises and simulations with each of the techniques.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.603.711.  Science of Patient Safety.  4 Credits.  

Provides an introduction to the science of safety and how it relates to problems with patient safety in health care. Explores the extent, nature and impact of safety problems. Introduces definitions for key concepts including error, adverse event, and harm. Provides a framework for understanding factors that cause, mitigate, and prevent errors and patient harm. Emphasizes the role of both individuals and systems in improving patient safety. Explains the importance of achieving a culture of safety, and the concept of high reliability in health care organizations. Points to roles that involve the practical application of this knowledge.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.603.721.  Leadership for Change and Patient Safety and Quality Improvement.  3 Credits.  

Describes, demonstrates and builds competence in leadership to support organizational quality and safety, and support transformational change. Explores organizational theory and frameworks for leadership and management. Explains the importance of vision, mission, and strategies for organizations. Describes organizational culture and articulates the role of exploring values and creating a shared vision in developing a culture of patient safety. Explains the roles of top managers, technical leaders and unit managers in safety improvement. Demonstrates the use of analytics in leading and management safety and quality improvement. Describes practices to engage leaders and staff to improve patient safety. Introduces topics including conflict management, negotiation, transparency, managing transitions, and innovation in health care.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.603.731.  Measurement and Evaluation in Quality and Safety.  4 Credits.  

Provides an overview of principles of good measurement and introduces applied evaluation methods for real world patient safety and quality improvement efforts that seek to implement evidence-based healthcare. Familiarizes students with important factors that influence success or failure in improvement efforts. Discusses implementation concepts and social and cultural phenomena and how to measure them. Prepares students to conduct initial data gathering, analysis and reporting in the Measurement Lab course.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.603.751.  Infection Prevention in Healthcare Settings.  2 Credits.  

Introduces hospital epidemiology, infection prevention and antimicrobial stewardship as core components of quality care, including standards and indicators, appropriate strategies and indicators to measure hospital-acquired infection in the U.S. and internationally, key methods for preventing the transmission of infection in healthcare facilities and components and benefits of antimicrobial stewardship programs. Provides a basis to plan effective hospital epidemiology, infection prevention and antimicrobial stewardship activities.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.603.880.  Patient Safety and Healthcare Quality integrative Activity.  4 Credits.  

This course will involve the research, analysis and writing of a complete and independent quality and patient safety improvement project. Concepts around the science of quality of medical care, patient safety and measurement will be heavily utilized. No new material will be covered. The finalized project will follow journal article format including an abstract, introduction/background, Literature review, methods, results and conclusion sections. The final project paper will represent an integrated and synthesized assessment of the quality and patient safety paradigm (Q&PS problem—Evidence—Intervention---assessment) applied to a relevant setting within the healthcare delivery process.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.603.931.  Measurement Lab in Quality & Safety.  2 Credits.  

Familiarizes students with different data sources and measurement methods to assess health care quality and patient safety. Data sources include both secondary data, including from administrative claims, medical records, and malpractice claims, and primary data including from cohorts, surveys, direct observation and clinical monitoring. Introduces different methods to measure structure, process and outcome, including both quantitative and qualitative data. Describes methods to analyze these data including techniques related to risk adjustment.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.601.  Public Health Humanitarian Emergencies.  4 Credits.  

Introduces different types of humanitarian emergencies, humanitarian architecture and provides an overview of sectoral focus areas of humanitarian response. Informs students of the environment in which these emergencies occur and how public health responses in various types of emergencies and contexts differ. The course explores mechanisms of preparedness, management of response to acute and prolonged humanitarian emergencies as well as long-term recovery.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.603.  Ethics in Global Health Practice.  2 Credits.  

Equips students to identify and analyze critical ethical issues in global health practice. It provides a forum for discussion of and deliberation about these issues, enabling students to explore a range of possible solutions. Students will practice using central concepts and frameworks of public health ethics to consider systematically the responsibilities of public health professionals in real-world global health cases.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.604.  Global Epidemiology Policies and Programs.  3 Credits.  

Presents the history, social and political context, organization, technical content, funding and evaluation of current, major, global initiatives for disease control. Emphasizes programs focused on health problems of the developing world and includes, initiatives for vaccines and immunization, non-communicable diseases, safe motherhood and reproductive health, malaria, Neglected Tropical Diseases, HIV, emerging infectious diseases, TB, tobacco control, nutritional interventions and injury control. Also examines the process of policy formulation and resource allocation to international health and disease control.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.621.  Design and Planning of Primary Health Care Projects.  4 Credits.  

Provides students an opportunity to learn the components for developing a proposal for primary health care program. This includes elements of costing human resources, financial management, training and supervision, and other basic components of primary health care management. Students practice developing the typical components of a project proposal.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.641.  Disaster Preparedness.  2 Credits.  

Introduces public health emergency preparedness concepts and procedures that are relevant for natural disasters, technological disasters, terrorism, and emerging threats such as infectious disease outbreaks and pandemics. Describes the roles of various agencies and organizations engaged in emergency preparedness and response and global health security. Describes the interactions across these agencies and organizations that help to ensure public health and safety. Provides an overview of methods to address different types of public health emergencies, including both planning and response perspectives with a focus on recent domestic and international public health emergencies and their consequences.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.651.  Introduction of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene in Emergencies.  2 Credits.  

Introduces water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) concepts, technical knowledge and practice in emergencies, including natural disasters and humanitarian emergencies. Addresses the importance of intersectoral collaboration among all sectors with an emphasis on WASH, health and nutrition. Focuses on community and behavioral aspects using examples from recent disasters. Describes the roles and coordination frameworks of all actors including Government, United Nations, international and national non-governmental organizations, and donors. Illustrates monitoring and evaluation various WASH methodologies and practices.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.701.  Assessment Approaches in Humanitarian Settings.  3 Credits.  

The goal of the course is to give students an overview of selected field-based methods used in humanitarian emergencies to measure basic health indicators and demographic characteristics of affected populations. Upon completion, students will be able to describe the assessment process in the various phases of humanitarian emergencies. Students will also be able to describe a variety of methods, both qualitative and quantitative, used in field-based assessments of humanitarian emergencies. These include: qualitative assessments, quantitative surveys. population estimation, and site planning.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.715.  Health Needs and Service Provision in Humanitarian Emergencies.  3 Credits.  

Addresses the health needs and the provision of health care to populations affected by disasters. Discusses such areas as who provides humanitarian assistance and how it is paid for. Explores strategies for assessing health needs. Considers a variety of topics including the use of information, water and sanitation, reproductive health, food and nutrition, and the provision of health services.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.721.  Securing Food Assistance and Nutrition in Humanitarian Emergencies.  2 Credits.  

Introduces food security, including the components of food security, causes for the deterioration of food security in humanitarian emergencies and nutritional deficiencies in humanitarian settings. Provides an overview of food and nutrition standards, nutrition surveys and response programming, including organizations involved in nutrition and food assistance and common programmatic interventions used in response to food crises. Addresses food assistance strategies, including in-kind assistance, cash transfers and livelihoods programming, as well as preventative and curative nutrition programs.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.731.  Management and Leadership in Humanitarian Health.  2 Credits.  

Examines an array of management and leadership models. Applies management and leadership theories and models to multiple humanitarian contexts. Assesses students' management and leadership styles and how they may affect humanitarian work. Discusses organizational structures and design as well as culture, and how they can affect humanitarian response.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.741.  Human Rights in Humanitarian Emergencies.  2 Credits.  

The goal of the course is to give students an introduction to human rights as an analytical framework, a tool, and a source of ethical guidance in humanitarian emergencies. The focus is on how human rights violations may cause, and shape the context of, humanitarian emergencies and how an examination of human rights frameworks and rights-based programs can guide researchers and practitioners to make ethical decisions in their work.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.751.  Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Low-Resource Humanitarian Emergencies.  2 Credits.  

Explores key issues in the development and evaluation of mental health and psychosocial support interventions with populations affected by humanitarian crises, such as natural disasters and armed conflicts. Discusses such questions as: ‘how do populations in diverse socio-cultural settings define mental health in the context of humanitarian crises?’; ‘How can we build on existing resources and practices that promote mental health in humanitarian crises?’; ‘What is known from epidemiological and intervention studies about common mental health problems and effective interventions in humanitarian settings?’. Challenges participants to reflect on translating science to practice, and vice versa. Course methods entail a mix of multimedia presentations and case discussions, focusing on real-world experiences.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.771.  Social & Cultural Basis for Community and Primary Health Programs.  3 Credits.  

Introduces students to the social and cultural aspects of global health programming at community, organizational, and policy levels. Utilizes social and behavioral theories to understand change processes and health program implementation with a particular focus on low- and middle-income countries, and underserved populations. Identifies the factors that promote and inhibit community involvement in PHC program development and implementation. Provides a foundation for planning appropriate Primary Health Care (PHC) programs.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.604.880.  Humanitarian Health integrative Activity.  4 Credits.  

The course will require students to synthesize knowledge and skills in humanitarian health on a project topic that demonstrates mastery program competencies. Students will complete a project on a selected aspect of humanitarian health, using one of a variety of formats including: 1) literature review; 2) program/operational plan; 3) program evaluation; 4) policy analysis; 5) research proposal; or 6) research report using data from a de-identified public data set. The results will be presented in the form of a final paper and an oral presentation.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.605.621.  Tobacco Prevention and Control.  3 Credits.  

Introduces tobacco control strategies, policies, and practices to provide an understanding of what is being done to address this public health problem. Provides a historical context in which to understand the consequences of smoking and tobacco use. Provides a framework to understand how tobacco control has evolved and includes practical approaches for tobacco prevention, control, cessation, advocacy, surveillance, and evaluation being implemented in the U.S. and in other countries. Discusses the transnational tobacco companies and their role in undermining actions to control tobacco use. Examines international tobacco control issues and the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) using lectures, case studies, and discussion.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.605.651.  Strategic Communication Planning.  4 Credits.  

Focuses on the step-by-step design, implementation, evaluation, and critique of communication programs designed to change behavior relevant to tobacco control Allows students to create actual health communication campaigns guided by P-Process worksheets. The course will explore the concept of stages applied to tobacco control – strategic defensive, stalemate, strategic offensive and consolidation. At the individual level, the course will sharpen approaches to specific audience segments such as non-smoker unlikely to smoke, non-smoker likely to smoke, occasional smoker and established smoker.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.605.671.  Tobacco Regulatory Science.  4 Credits.  

This course will provide students with an overview of tobacco product regulation, including cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, shisha, and emerging nicotine delivery systems, such as e-cigarettes. Students will gain a working knowledge of tobacco regulatory frameworks, including the Framework Convention of Tobacco Control (Articles 9 and 10), and national policies, including the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. Students will learn about past regulatory successes, including fire-safe cigarettes, flavor and menthol bans, and emerging strategies to limit nicotine content. Students will learn to search industry patents to understand how product innovation is protected and presented. Finally, they will study the tobacco industry’s tactics to counter tobacco regulation by critically assessing of media stories.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.605.701.  Leadership in Tobacco Control.  2 Credits.  

Through lectures, discussion, and exercises, students develop an understanding of the role of the tobacco control leader in policy development and implementation and the essential knowledge and skills this role requires. The course provides a framework for understanding the process of working effectively with and leading others and emphasizes the role of the leader in leading change and developing a vision for the future of tobacco control.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.605.735.  Quantitative Methods for Tobacco Control.  4 Credits.  

Quantitative Methods for Tobacco Control teaches students about the quantitative methods that are most often used in tobacco control and tobacco-related research. Topics to be covered will include study designs and methods commonly used in tobacco control research, including methods to assess the burden of tobacco-related disease and evaluate prevention and cessation interventions. Students have the opportunity to apply these new skills in interpreting and presenting quantitative data.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.605.745.  Qualitative Methods for Tobacco Control.  3 Credits.  

• Reviews the methods and rationale for incorporating qualitative approaches into tobacco control research. • Explores the main principles of qualitative research and consider how these principles shape the questions to which qualitative methods can best be applied in tobacco control research. • Introduces applied research techniques used in tobacco control, including observational studies, focus group discussion, in-depth interviews, and documents analysis. • Describes techniques to analyze qualitative data collection and disseminate findings.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.605.751.  Implementation: Making Change Happen in Tobacco Control.  3 Credits.  

Provides an introduction to implementation science in the context of tobacco control. Identifies the challenges associated with tobacco control policy/program implementation and highlights how implementation science can address them. Discusses commonly used implementation frameworks and emphasizes implementation determinants, strategies, and outcomes that may help guide implementation efforts. Examines key implementation topics in the context of tobacco control including industry interference, enforcement and compliance.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.606.601.  Fundamentals in Global Health Practice.  4 Credits.  

Global health requires practitioners to be well versed in understanding health systems, the controlling disease, and improving the health of mothers and children, and vulnerable populations. This course provides an introduction to these issues. Students will have an opportunity to apply these skills by analyzing the health situation in select low and middle-income countries.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.606.840.  Seminars in Health Management Information Systems for Low- and Middle-income Countries.  1 Credit.  

Covers basic components of health information management systems (HMIS) in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs) including vital registration, routine service data, health surveys and surveillance systems. Offers an overview of the use of HMIS data for decision making in LMICs. Describes processes for collecting data through HMIS in LMICs and considers challenges to the quality of HMIS in LMICs with an eye toward strengthening these systems.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.607.701.  Health and Safety Preparation for Global Health Assignments.  1 Credit.  

Whether you've traveled before or not, living and working internationally can be challenging. Learn how best to prepare and make the most of your time. Explores health and wellness concerns for travelers. Examines key prevention, safety, and travel medicine principles and services to contextualize risks and maintain wellness. Reviews applicable interventions, appropriate vaccines, and personal protection methods to prepare students to respond to expected and unexpected situations. Assists students with personal preparations for travel through country-specific assignments. Challenges students to examine travel health and safety priorities through case studies and discussions.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.607.704.  Essential Medicines, Commodities and Supplies Needed for Community Level Primary Health Care Interventions.  2 Credits.  

Primary health care programs in low and middle-income countries require essential health commodities be made available at the community level. Logistic systems need to be developed to ensure that commodities are adequately estimated and delivered. In addition, systems for safely maintaining and monitoring stocks are needed at the community level.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.607.711.  Applying Evaluation to More Effectively Reach Communities Through Primary Health Care.  3 Credits.  

Presents fundamental concepts and approaches for evaluating primary health care programs in low- and middle- income countries. Prepares students to analyze real-world programs so that they can make basic decisions resulting in evaluation designs that can be practically applied. Discusses actual experiences of working with implementers to design evaluations that balance methodological rigor with restraints of time and budget. Includes fundamental concepts such as choosing indicators, objectives and appropriate study designs; working with implementers who may not be evaluation experts; and understanding context.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.607.721.  Urban Primary Health Care in Low and Middle-income Countries.  3 Credits.  

Presents emergent public health issues related to the rapid growth of urban population in low- and middle-income countries. Explores the inadequacy of conventional health services for meeting the needs of the urban poor. Presents selected cases studies as examples of primary health care approaches that effectively addressed the public health consequences of rapid urbanization.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.607.724.  Applying Household Surveys to Primary Health Care Programs.  3 Credits.  

Introduces participants to fundamental skills needed to design and manage implementation of household surveys. Presents real world experiences of using the Knowledge, Practice, and Coverage (KPC) tool for household surveys in middle and low-resource settings. Includes constructing a questionnaire from standard KPC modules, indicator selection, sampling plan development, use of parallel sampling, household selection, management and oversight plan, and ethical considerations. Introduces participants to adjustments that can be made so that the survey can be implemented within time and budget constraints.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.607.735.  Planning Training and Learning Programs for Community Health Workers.  4 Credits.  

Discusses the skills required for planning, designing, and evaluating training and learning programs for CHWs. Explores how training and learning needs are determined by CHWs, their communities, and national contexts. Provides students with an opportunity to design a training guide based upon an assessment of CHW’s learning needs. Demonstrates how to outline a formative, summative, and follow-up evaluation plan for CHW training and learning needs.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.607.751.  Building Community Capacity for Primary Health Care in Low and Middle-Income Countries.  3 Credits.  

This course, coming near the end of the MAS in Community Based PHC, reinforces an understanding of the origins and recent advances in community-oriented PHC through case studies from low- and middle-income countries. Focuses on problem-solving skills in practical situations by connecting case experiences with the contexts where students are working or will work in the future. Examines strategies and frameworks to assess and enhance community-based approaches to building community capacity. Explores current events and emerging opportunities and challenges for community based PHC.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.607.880.  Integrative Activity in Community-Based Primary Health Care.  4 Credits.  

This course will enable the learner to apply skills obtained through the coursework in the MAS in Community-Based Primary Health Care to design or update a community based PHC program in a real life community. Learners will select a community where they have lived or worked and obtain data and reports to analyze the social, cultural, epidemiological and demographic profile of the community and use this information to design strategies that involvement community members in improving their health. Learners will draw on previous course materials and independent desk review to produce a program strategy/plan document that includes human and material resource development and an evaluation component.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.608.705.  Emerging Trends in Pharmaceutical Systems Strengthening.  3 Credits.  

Explores pharmaceuticals management and universal health coverage effective, feasible frameworks and possible metrics to measure capacity and accountability. Considers the big picture in pharmaceutical systems: pharma regulatory harmonization and convergence; country, global, and donor financing policies; and sustainability strategies. Presents and contrasts different countries regulatory systems for medicines. Introduces the importance of pharmaceutical harmonization convergence/reliance. Addresses selected challenges within the pharmaceutical services delivery framework among under-served and within LMIC populations.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.608.712.  Frameworks and Tools for Health Systems in Global Settings.  3 Credits.  

Explores health systems in global settings, with a focus on low and middle income (LMIC) contexts, and examines approaches to improving the performance of health systems. Focuses on frameworks, tools, skills, and strategies to understand, influence, and evaluate health systems in LMICs. Identifies key institutions, functions, and performance issues for national and local health systems. By using frameworks and tools, students gain experience in systematically analyzing health systems and methods to plan, implement, and evaluate changes in health systems in a variety of settings, including countries in various levels of demographic, epidemiologic and economic transitions. Covers key controversies in health systems, including issues in monitoring health systems performance, the role of the public sector, dealing with unregulated private health markets, linking priority health programs and health systems, raising accountability in the health system, etc.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.608.725.  Quality Management Concepts and Tools for Healthcare in Low and Middle income Countries.  4 Credits.  

Presents the concepts, principles, and tools of total quality management methods for health systems in low and middle income economies. Emphasizes integrated health systems management; fostering a genuine team approach in the face of an hierarchical tradition; central importance of community governance; interventions designed based on evidence and standards of practice and in an equitable fashion; introducing a measurement-based approach to problem solving, emphasizing analysis of service delivery process and outcome; and integrating implementation science as an integral component of the management system.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.608.771.  Non-Governmental Organizations and the Administration of Global Health Programs.  3 Credits.  

Students will describe the practical challenges and philosophical dilemmas faced by NGOs operating in low- and middle-income countries, and basic concepts in the administration of global health programs. Simulation exercises will allow students to experience and analyze real-world scenarios faced by NGO managers and leaders. The first half of the course will focus on the role of NGOs in the health sector, situating a manager’s responsibilities in the broader context of the development and humanitarian environment. The second half will focus on the internal workings of an NGO and the day-to-day challenges of managing strategy, finances, human resources, and accountability.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.

PH.608.880.  Integrative Activity in Global Health Planning and Management.  4 Credits.  

This course will enable the learner to apply skills obtained through the coursework in the MAS in Global Health Planning and management to identify and address an organizational problem or need in a real life organization that focuses on underserved people in aa global health setting. Learners will select an organization where they have worked and obtain data and reports to analyze the environmental, structural, human, technical and policy characteristics of the organization and use this information to design strategies for improving organizational functioning. Learners will draw on previous course materials and independent desk review to produce a program strategy/plan document that includes human and material resource strengthening and an evaluation component.

Course location and modality is found on the JHSPH website.