SA.660.699.  Military Basics.  

Military Basics is a non-credit 2-day required introductory course for all first-year Strategic Studies concentrators. It will provide students the basic knowledge required to understand the fundamentals of military organizations and cultures, the DOD budget and who serves, the military chain of command, and a survey of military uniforms and equipment from each service. Students with current or previous military background are only required to take the first day of the course; all other are required to attend both days.

SA.660.701.  American Defense Policy.  4 Credits.  

This seminar course will focus on three questions: What is American defense policy? How is it formulated and implemented? What are the enduring and variable aspects of American defense policy? In order to address these questions the course will explore the: 1) Links between American foreign policy and defense policy; 2) Key actors in American defense policy, including: the NSC, the military, Congress, the intelligence community, and independent commissions; 3) Contemporary issues in American defense policy, including: the role of contractors on the battlefield; civilian control of the military; and crafting defense policy under demanding economic and international circumstances. Student should complete the course with a better understanding of the challenges involved in formulating and implementing an effective defense policy and be able to confidently participate in discussions on such matters with defense policy makers. The course deliverables will reflect those that an analyst would provide a senior decision maker in the Department of Defense. They will include 3 short papers and a timed decision briefing.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.704.  Operations Analysis.  2 Credits.  

This half-term course will introduce students to the fundamentals of military operations analysis, their historical importance and their practical application. The overall goal of the course is to enable students to apply relatively straightforward analytic techniques to estimate the relative combat power of opposing military forces. Emphasis will be on modeling air and naval forces, but ground combat modeling will also be discussed. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.706.  Basics of the U.S. Defense Budget.  2 Credits.  

This course provides a practical understanding of defense budget terminology, the budgeting process, and methods of budgetary analysis. It explores long-term trends and near-term challenges in the defense budget, including changes in military personnel costs, operation and maintenance funding, major acquisition programs, and war-related funding. The course also covers the process and politics by which the budget request is created within the executive branch and subsequently modified and enacted by Congress. By the end of the course, students will be able to: 1) locate budget data in Office of the Management of the Budget and Department of Defense publications and understand the caveats associated with different sources of data; 2) conduct basic budget analysis, such as adjusting for inflation and calculating compound annual growth rates; 3) understand what is included in each of the major titles of the budget (RDT&E, procurement, O&M, MILCON, MILPERS, etc.); and 4) understand the iterative relationship between defense strategy and defense budgets. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.707.  Operations Analysis OR Naval Power.  2 Credits.  
SA.660.708.  Grand Strategy and Liberal Disorder.  4 Credits.  

This seminar will investigate the question of a relationship between the palpable travails of Western liberal order and the intensified antagonism between Russia and the West. It will focus on Europe, and proceed from the assumption that the Cold War of 1946-1989 offers a useful analytical framework, even if the analogy needs to be approached with a prudent scepticism. If there is a new Cold War, it is very different from the first. [...] After initially focussing on Western grand strategy in the Cold war, the seminar will cover the various contemporary dimensions of European and transatlantic insecurity.

SA.660.709.  Economic Sanctions and Statecraft.  4 Credits.  

The global community is increasingly drawing on economic tools to confront the whole panoply of security and policy threats, from terrorism, narcotics trafficking, corruption, and cybercrime to nuclear proliferation and human rights violations. Indeed, financial and economic sanctions have formed the primary U.S. government response to some of this past decade’s largest geopolitical threats, whether Iran or North Korea’s nuclear programs or Russia’s incursions into eastern Ukraine and election meddling. Other countries – most notably China and Russia – have also sharpened their use of economic tools of statecraft, although more often through foreign investment/aid and trade restrictions than through formal sanctions. This course will provide a grounding in the theory and practice of economic sanctions and statecraft as it is employed today – namely, how governments and the United Nations wield financial and economic tools to shape geopolitics and influence the behavior of state and non-state actors. We will examine the emergence of “smart” or targeted sanctions, as well as the oft-misunderstood “secondary sanctions.” We will pay particular attention to the design of sanctions programs and the practical elements that are necessary for a sanctions program to succeed. Beyond sanctions, we will assess how trade, assistance, and investment are being used by governments around the world to advance geopolitical, as opposed to economic, goals. Finally, we will take up the trend lines and potential unintended effects of the growing reliance on economic statecraft – how targeted countries are shoring up their defenses and striking back and how policymakers can prepare themselves for the challenges to come. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.710.  Illicit Finance.  4 Credits.  

This course will examine the methodologies used by criminals and terrorists to raise and move money, the tools that governments use to track and stop them, and the latest developments in the field. Students will look at how illicit finance campaigns are being fought in the areas of terrorism, organized crime, human rights violations, and cyber-crime. The course will cover both the systemic/structural and targeted/tactical levels of the fight. At the systemic level, governments are working to lift the tide for all boats, and enhance global anti-money laundering and combating terrorist financing (AML/CFT) standards and implementation. In the targeted arena, law enforcement, intelligence, and private sector compliance officers are tracking and targeting financial flows as a means to unravel plots, uncover conspirators, and disrupt networks. At the same time, illicit actors have become more sophisticated and more resourceful in hiding and moving money. Students will learn not just what is being done but how to critically assess tools and policy efforts in the field.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.711.  Military Adaptation Under Fire.  4 Credits.  

This course examines the role of adaptation in war. Since it is virtually impossible to predict the exact nature of future conflicts, the military that is best able to adapt to unforeseen circumstances will have strong advantages on the battlefield and a better chance of achieving the strategic objectives of the war. This course starts by developing a framework for understanding adaptation, based on the interplay of doctrine, technology, and leadership. We then examine several modern conflicts, comparing pre-war concepts and training with what happened when the war started and examining the sources of both success and failure. The course concludes by looking forward, examining current debates about what the next big U.S. war will look like, and assessing the extent to which the U.S. military will be able to adapt to an uncertain future security environment.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.712.  The Human Face of Battle.  4 Credits.  

This course examines the experience of war from the viewpoint of the frontline soldier, sailor, airman or Marine. The course will seek to understand what makes young men and women both fight and protect their comrades in the face of grave risks to personal survival, and look at how policy decisions made safely in national capitals translate into deadly combat tasks for young men and women in combat under fire. We will use works of fiction and nonfiction in literature and film to reflect on the enduring nature of war throughout modern history. Understanding what our societies ask of soldiers in battle is essential for future policymakers to make responsible decisions on how and when to use military force.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.713.  Civil-Military Relations.  4 Credits.  

<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.714.  Information Security 1.  4 Credits.  

Cybersecurity is one of the 21st century’s top security concerns. Modern societies rely on the internet, connected devices, and computer-controlled systems, including infrastructure with life—critical applications. The class provides a solid foundation for tomorrow’s leaders to come to terms with one of the most challenging new areas of national security. INFOSEC I and II are offered as a two-term class (INFOSEC I a prerequisite for INFOSEC II). It covers cybersecurity from farm to table starting with the big-picture cyberwar debate; moves to “101” sessions on The Internet, Cryptography, Network Forensics, Industrial Control Systems, Mobile Security, and Open Source Intelligence; and then applies these new tools to higher-level discussions (Attribution, Commercial Espionage, Bulk Collection, Crypto Anarchy, Cyber Crime, Disinformation, Deterrence, and Legal Aspects). Moving from technical to political levels of analysis, this focus is a no-nonsense approach to the politics of cybersecurity and focuses on a triad of technical detail, history, and conceptual clarity. Optional technical labs are organized by students. Students translate between technical and political spheres, and will move into the digital forensics and threat intelligence fields after completing this class. Coursework requirements are term-specific. It is possible for students to take only the fall term (INFOSEC I). Preference will be given to students who commit to both INFOSEC I & II. Note: no technical background is required. Willingness to learn fast and invest time to understand some technical foundations of cybersecurity. Bring a laptop into class (you must be able to install software; any OS is fine).<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.660.738[C]

SA.660.715.  Information Security 2.  4 Credits.  

Cybersecurity is one of the 21st century’s top security concerns. Modern societies rely on the internet, connected devices, and computer-controlled systems, including infrastructure with life—critical applications. The class provides a solid foundation for tomorrow’s leaders to come to terms with one of the most challenging new areas of national security. INFOSEC I and II are offered as a two-term class (INFOSEC I a prerequisite for INFOSEC II). It covers cybersecurity from farm to table starting with the big-picture cyberwar debate; moves to “101” sessions on The Internet, Cryptography, Network Forensics, Industrial Control Systems, Mobile Security, and Open Source Intelligence; and then applies these new tools to higher-level discussions (Attribution, Commercial Espionage, Bulk Collection, Crypto Anarchy, Cyber Crime, Disinformation, Deterrence, and Legal Aspects). Moving from technical to political levels of analysis, this focus is a no-nonsense approach to the politics of cybersecurity and focuses on a triad of technical detail, history, and conceptual clarity. Optional technical labs are organized by students. Students translate between technical and political spheres, and will move into the digital forensics and threat intelligence fields after completing this class. Coursework requirements are term-specific. It is possible for students to take only the fall term (INFOSEC I). Preference will be given to students who commit to both INFOSEC I & II. Note: no technical background is required. Willingness to learn fast and invest time to understand some technical foundations of cybersecurity. Bring a laptop into class (you must be able to install software; any OS is fine).<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): SA.660.714[C]

SA.660.717.  The Private Sector and Cybersecurity.  4 Credits.  

How should the U.S. government respond when companies get hacked? What responsibility do Twitter and Facebook have in preventing fake news? While some facets of cybersecurity follow the broader principles of international relations, the predominance of the private sector makes it substantially different from most issues we study as national security practitioners. This course will take a "David and Goliath" approach to this subject. First, we'll examine the attack surface of how private companies—the "Davids"—are attacked, their responsibility to defend themselves, and how that complicates foreign policy responses. Next we’ll look at the "Goliaths": tech as an industry and the competitive pressures that drive towards scale. We’ll examine how this concentration affects the government’s ability to achieve its objectives and how it must use tech companies as intermediaries. Although not designed for a technical audience, students will develop a sufficient understanding of the technical components of the internet to understand how attacks are mounted.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.718.  Disinformation.  4 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.660.738[C]

SA.660.719.  The Essentials of Statecraft, Strategy, and U.S. National Security.  4 Credits.  

How do policymakers understand threats to U.S. national security? What instruments of statecraft are available to address these threats? How are these instruments used effectively as part of a broader national security strategy? What challenges are likely to headline national security in the 21st century? Current and future foreign policy practitioners grapple with these issues on a regular basis. In exploring these enduring questions, this graduate-level course engages with three broad themes: 1) the philosophical and practical roots of U.S. national security; 2) the art of strategic thinking; and 3) the challenge and promise of integrating tools of statecraft to realize national security. A novel combination of seminars, simulations, exercises, site visits, and film will guide students as they explore these equally timeless and pressing themes. Additionally, students will consider how their academic training prepares them for careers in national security.The overarching goals of this intensive, four-week program are twofold. First, it aims to empower talented undergraduates with the skills necessary to become sophisticated consumers and analysts of national security scholarship and policy. Second, it strives to prepare students for bending their academic training toward informing effective, sustainable U.S. national security policy. Suitable for high-preforming undergraduates from any discipline, the SAIS Summer Academy is an opportunity to engage some of the most consequential issues facing the United States alongside leading faculty and practitioners in the heart of Washington, DC.

SA.660.720.  State-Sponsored Cyber Threat Actors.  4 Credits.  

State-sponsored cyber operations are a staple of 21st century geopolitics. News reports of digital intrusions, espionage, and sabotage are abundant but the ability to evaluate their contents eludes laypeople and political decision-makers alike. This course aims to communicate a conceptual framework for understanding the cyber espionage and sabotage operations of state-sponsored threat actors. Students will critically analyze contemporary reporting on active espionage campaigns with an eye towards understanding the rationale for assigning attacker intentions, configuration, and intentions. In the process, students will come to understand the life-cycle of these operations, their necessary investment, and outcomes.Technical competence is encouraged but not required. Students of INFOSEC I & II will have an advantage with requisite concepts. Students interested in acquiring greater technical competency will be provided with additional materials.

SA.660.721.  Fundamentals of Military Operations.  4 Credits.  

This class will provide students with a working knowledge of how modern U.S. military operations are planned and executed. It will cover the land, sea, air, cyber, and space domains, as well as how they are all integrated into joint operations. Students will gain the tools needed to critique and assess the viability of a diverse range of military options that are provided to civilian policy officials, and will develop a working knowledge of key operational tools and concepts. It will also provide a deeper understanding of the culture, core values, and basic operating concepts of each military service, and will involve a wide range of practical exercises. This course is designed for primarily for students without military experience who will encounter the planning and conduct of military operations in their careers. Students with previous military experience are also encouraged to take this course, since they will greatly expand their knowledge of military operations outside the scope of their parent service. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.730.  Diplomatic Disasters.  4 Credits.  

“Only fools learn from their mistakes: I prefer to learn from the mistakes of others,” Bismarck is reputed to have said. This course looks at mistakes made by intelligent politicians and statesmen in the midst of war and revolutions. It takes a broad view of diplomacy as statecraft, and not merely the technique of representation and negotiation, and it explores why and how competent diplomats can get it badly wrong.<a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/courses/strategic_studies.html#SS660730" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.731.  The Wars of Afghanistan.  4 Credits.  

The current war in Afghanistan is but the latest for a land that has seen nearly constant warfare throughout its history. This course will examine in depth four conflicts fought in Afghanistan (and Pakistan): Alexander the Great's conquests, the British attempts to subdue the Pashtuns, the Soviet battle with the mujahidin, and the fight against the Taliban and al-Qa'ida since 9/11. Themes that we will explore include invasion and conquest (how does one know that territory is "conquered"?); resistance and insurgency in the Afghanistan context; tribalism and ethnicity (concentrating on the Pashtuns); and counterinsurgencies in theory and practice in Afghanistan.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.732.  Insurgency and Irregular Warfare.  4 Credits.  

Provides a theoretical and empirical grounding in irregular warfare, including the actions of insurgent groups and states such as Russia, Iran, China, the United States, and United Kingdom. The course examines primary source documents on insurgency and irregular warfare, important theoretical texts, and historical and contemporary case studies in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.735.  Military Space Systems and the Space Domain.  2 Credits.  

The course introduces students to military space systems and the use of the space domain as a component of military power. It provides an overview of the space environment, including different types of orbits and their uses, space launch, and key differences between the space domain and other domains of warfare. It covers the major types of military space systems used by the U.S. and other countries: precision navigation and timing; communications; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR); missile warning; space situational awareness; and counterspace capabilities. The course examinea the operational capabilities each type of space system enables, the threats posed to these systems, and the merits of commercial and terrestrial alternatives to military space systems. This is a two-credit course.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.740.  Strategy And Policy.  4 Credits.  

Provides an overview of strategic studies, which deals with the preparation and use of military power to serve the ends of politics. Discusses the development of warfare from the mid-19th century through the present and addresses major theoretical concepts, including those found in Carl von Clausewitz’s On War. Required of all students in Strategic Studies. In the fall semester, enrollment only open to 1st year Strategic Studies concentrators and MIPP affiliates. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.742.  American Grand Strategy: 1945 to the Present.  4 Credits.  

What is Grand Strategy? How do governments harness all elements of national power to accomplish a state’s political objectives? This course examines the problems associated with the articulation and execution of grand strategy through an examination of the legacy from the founding of the U.S. through the inter-war years, with a focus on the American experience since the end of World War II. Beginning with the strategy of coalition warfare during World War II, students will consider how U.S. leaders from Roosevelt to Obama have come to grips with questions of prioritizing national objectives, leveraging comparative American advantages vis-à-vis adversaries, articulating goals, and executing plans against a backdrop of competitive democratic politics. Students will also examine the periodic strategic adjustments that Presidents and their advisors have had to undertake. Drawing on both primary strategy documents and a rich secondary literature, the course will range from NSC 68 to President Obama’s West Point Address. In the end, students will assess the whether grand strategy remains an option in a period of partisan gridlock, political polarization and purported national decline.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.744.  The Nature and Character of Cyber Conflict.  4 Credits.  

Cybersecurity is one of the 21st century’s top security concerns. This course will provide a framework to understand cybersecurity history, trends, concepts, and policies. We will explore the intersection of threat intelligence, digital forensics, incident response, strategic studies, intelligence studies, and international relations. Students will learn how to evaluate technical intelligence reports; how to assess the political and commercial significance of various threats; how to design and deliver cybersecurity policy; and how to translate between technical and political debates.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.745.  Technology and War.  4 Credits.  

This course aims to develop students’ ability to analyze military technology, including the ability to identify and comprehend technical facts, to discern patterns in the evolution of technology, to understand how component technologies become parts of larger systems, to explore how military organizations vary in their exploitation of the same basic technologies, and to appreciate the nature of technological interaction among competing organizations. The course also aims to teach students how to present technical matters to a lay audience clearly and concisely, orally and in writing, and to develop group work skills. No technical background is required.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.748.  Thucydides On War.  4 Credits.  
SA.660.751.  Strategic St Res Seminar.  4 Credits.  

This course deals with the application of historical method, and historical learning more broadly, to the making of policy, with particular reference to security and strategic issues. It aims to develop students’ research skills, and thereby make them effective consumers as well as producers of applied research in the field of strategic studies. At the same time, it examines the way in which historical modes of thought can inform, or distort, strategic decision-making.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.753.  Air Power and Strategy.  2 Credits.  

This half-term course introduces the concepts and technology of air power, how they have been developed, used, and become a part of a country’s strategy. The course includes air power’s use in all military services, primarily of the U.S. military, linking as well the differing perspectives of air power by each service. The course will step though the major elements of air power: command of the air; air to ground operations (including strategic bombing, air interdiction and close air support); and the supporting structures of intelligence/surveillance/reconnaissance, air refueling, and air lift. The course will examine each of these elements through their uses in wars and crises as well as evaluating their future employment. Each student will prepare, present, and write on a selected recent or current air operation (Iraq, Libya, Afghanistan, Syria). This is a half-semester, two-credit course.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.756.  Net Assessment.  4 Credits.  

Net assessment is a novel approach to long-term, strategic, national security analysis developed by Andrew Marshall. The course explores how to analyze and integrate historical and emerging competitive dynamics, institutional and social behavior, innovation studies and technology trends in order to bring fresh, diagnostic insight to senior-level decision-makers. Uses case studies from World War II, the Cold War and the Revolution in Military Affairs. Graded material consists of executive-level, interactive issue papers and a final briefing. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.761.  East Asian Security.  4 Credits.  

In this course, contemporary security challenges and policy responses in East Asia are analyzed from a variety of different theoretical perspectives. The basic assumption is that only such a multi-facetted approach can help us understand and integrate the broad spectrum of security concerns and the intricate interactions between them, ranging from human security through traditional national security to regional and global security issues, in this highly complex region (defined here as China and its maritime environment in North and South East Asia). And only such a comprehensive understanding of security in East Asia can provide us with useful tools to evaluate national, regional and multilateral policy responses. (STRAT)

SA.660.765.  The First Nuclear Era: Strategy, Force Structure, Nuclear Crises: 1945-1998.  4 Credits.  

Beginning with the Manhattan Project, this course will explore the ways nuclear weapons transformed the world we inhabit today, the effects of nuclear weapons on the conduct of international politics, and how people dealt with the issue of the shifting strategic balance, especially the loss of the American nuclear monopoly. The main learning goal of the course is to give students a historical, strategic, and theoretical background to allow them to understand and assess the key debates and policies regarding nuclear weapons that the United States will likely face in the coming decades. We will do so through an examination of the development of nuclear strategy from World War II to end of the 20th century, the characteristics of nuclear weapons, and fundamental issues stemming from the possession of nuclear weapons. We will conclude by exploring what effect nuclear weapons might have on international politics and US foreign policy in the coming decades and the relevance of the classics of nuclear strategic thinking to the recent nuclear doctrine.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.776.  Introduction to Defense Analysis.  4 Credits.  

Why bother with quantitative analysis? Because analysis drives many policy debates. The course explores the connection between quantitative analysis and policy formulation in areas such as strategy development, wartime operations, force structure design, budget tradeoffs and weapon system acquisition. Covers many different types of analysis, not only the classic kinds of cost-effectiveness and combat models but also manpower, investment and cost. Although geared toward students going into national security positions, the methods and approaches apply broadly. Aims to make students intelligent consumers of analytic products, not quantitative analysts. No advanced mathematics required.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.777.  The Art of Strategic Decision.  4 Credits.  

The sequel to the Strategy and Policy course, this course explores both concepts (e.g., the origins of war, the nature of strategic thought) and cases (drawn from 20th and 21st century military history) in greater depth. Covers conventional and irregular warfare. Readings include theory and historical material, some of the latter resting on independent student research. Combines lecture and discussion, and assignments center on memoranda and a group project. Prerequisite: Strategy and Policy. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): SA.660.740[C]

SA.660.779.  American Intelligence: Role Practice and Impact.  4 Credits.  

Offers an introduction and overview of the discipline of intelligence. Structured around three themes: the policy context in which U.S. intelligence services perform their missions, the professional techniques of intelligence collection and analysis and the enduring issues, such as counterintelligence, that have characterized the field for centuries. Features a combination of lectures, discussions, field trips and practical exercises designed to give students experience in intelligence writing and briefing. No prerequisites, but Strategy and Policy is recommended. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.780.  Thucydides & Machiavelli.  4 Credits.  

The problem is the imperial democracy or republic, the cases are Athens and Rome, the texts are Thucydides’s History of the Peloponnesian War, Polybius’s Histories, Tacitus’s Agricola, Montesquieu’s The Grandeur of the Romans and Their Decline and Machiavelli’s Discourses on Livy. Emphasizing close reading and historical analysis, the course examines whether and to what extent these classic works retain their value as analyses of strategic behavior. (This is a cross-listed course offered by the Strategic Studies Program that also can fulfill a requirement for the Global Theory and History Program.) <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.660.748[C]

SA.660.789.  The War with Al-Qa'ida and ISIS.  4 Credits.  

Examines the “global war on terrorism,” looking at the roots of the conflict, the reasons for 9/11 and the current course of the war. Introduces students to the evolution of extremist Islam, jihadist ideology and groups such as al Qaeda and ISIS, while not neglecting the influence of U.S. policy in the Islamic world. Also examines in detail the strategies and tactics that both the jihadis and the United States have adopted to fight the war. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.790.  Shakespeare on War and Politics.  4 Credits.  

This, therefore, is the praise of Shakespeare, that his drama is the mirror of life.” Samuel Johnson’s judgment applies particularly well to war and politics. This course will explore how Shakespeare depicts the acquisition of power, its exercise, and its voluntary or forcible relinquishment. Through a close reading of whole plays and selected scenes and speeches it will examine coups, politically motivated assassination, the theater of violence, insurrection, the launching of war, civil-military relations, and ghosts, among other topics. Combines lecture and discussion with close reading of texts, analytic memos, and a research paper.Limited to twenty, no prerequisites.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.816.  Seminar in Crisis Simulation.  4 Credits.  

Explores the background and discipline associated with simulated crisis events. This hands-on course focuses on developing detailed crisis scenarios and decision-making frameworks, then applying them to complex policy questions involving various national and international actors. Students design and control a campus-wide SAIS simulation in early March. Some 75–80 non-seminar students from all concentrations typically participate. Course meets across fall and spring semesters, though credit for one semester is earned. Limited to 10 students.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.890.  Anthropology for Strategists.  4 Credits.  

What relevance does anthropology have for the formulation and execution of national security strategy? This course acquaints students who have a background in strategic studies with anthropological concepts and modes of thinking. Helps students map a social system, identify how power is apportioned within a society, interpret the system of communicative symbols that transmit meaning within a culture, appreciate how and why adversaries fight, identify how cultural forms express and transmit meaning and evaluate social change. Uses a series of case studies to examine how culture affects warfare and the effect of warfare on culture. Limited to 20 students.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.660.903.  STP III.  4 Credits.  
SA.660.904.  STP IV.  4 Credits.