SA.790.714.  In Search of Security: South Asia Today.  4 Credits.  

This course examines key security challenges in contemporary South Asia and their implications for the United States. The course begins with an overview of the subcontinent's history and its partition with focus the development of American policy toward South Asia. Then we examine the politics of India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, and their interactions in war and peace. The continuing challenges of terrorism and nuclear proliferation will be explored as well.<a href="https://jh.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=23a452cd-70be-4430-a865-a872013e8cc4" target="_blank">Click here to see a video introduction for the course.</a><a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.790.716.  Politics, Religion and Violence in South Asia.  4 Credits.  

Whether manifested by the vexed Babri Masjid issue in India, the rise of Islamist parties in Pakistan and Bangladesh or the influence of Buddhist monks on the civil war in Sri Lanka, religion dominates many political debates throughout South Asia. This course analyzes the impact of religion (especially Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism and Sikhism) on policy—and the impact of politics on the transformations of the faiths themselves. Views sectarian conflict (whether based on religion or caste) through the lenses of anthropology and political science.<a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/courses/south_asia_studies.html#SA790716" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.790.718.  Pakistan: In the Eye of a Geo-Strategic Storm.  4 Credits.  

This is a course that seeks to study the security and strategic challenges Pakistan both faces and presents to the world. Pakistan's historic struggle for democratization, political stability, and national security , along with its unending search for identity and national purpose, have been added challenges following 9/11. They affect as well as reflect regional and international factors that have created a "perfect geo-strategic storm" for Pakistan. The country finds itself at the nexus of the ambitions of a rising India and a revolutionary Iran, a conflicted Afghanistan, and undiminished militancy both at home and within neighboring Afghanistan. This takes place with the simultaneous development of the lengthening strategic shadows of China and the United States, and the security concerns of the global community. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.790.722.  Infrastructure and Development in South Asia.  4 Credits.  

Infrastructure is a critical element in economic development, but it is much more. Studying how a state provides for infrastructure can tell us a lot about state/center relations, which interest group matter and how do they exert political influence and above all how does the state address complex policy issues. Because these issues address sensitive political questions, this is a political economy course that will focus heavily on how and why decisions are reached on infrastructure issues. The course will focus on India analyzing its governance structure, interest groups and framework for policy problem solving. The largest and by far the wealthiest South Asian state, is committed to spending at least one trillion dollars on infrastructure over the next five years, making infrastructure the biggest sector for the country’s economy. There is no prerequisite for this class, though taking the course on Comparative Political and Economic Development of South Asia, taught each year in the first semester, would be helpful. Course registration requires departmental approval because there is an accompanying one-week study trip on the same topic in mid-January. Register for the course as you normally would, and the South Asia department will follow up with you regarding an application and other relevant issues. If you have any questions please contact southasia@jhu.edu<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.790.724.  Political Economy of India.  4 Credits.  

This course will introduce students to the political economy of development in the world’s largest democracy -- India. The themes discussed during the course will be those that are both important to India and to a general study of political and economic development in a federal democracy more broadly. These general themes include: Indian federalism, and states as a laboratory of developmental experiments; identity politics and development; the role of government; and criminality, corruption and dynastic politics.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.790.725.  Energy and Environment in South Asia.  4 Credits.  

This course presents a comprehensive overview of energy and environmental policy in South Asia. The course covers a wide range of environmental and energy problems, broadly defined, from population growth and energy poverty to groundwater and urban air pollution. The course looks at the social, economic, and political drivers of energy and environmental problems. It examines contemporary policies and the institutions that have produced them, the role of the South Asian region in international energy markets, and global environmental politics. All students conduct original research to develop innovative, practical solutions to the region's pressing problems.<a href="http://bit.ly/2w9X0Ji" target="_blank">Click here to see a video introduction for the course.</a><a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.790.726.  The Pakistan Conundrum: Crisis and Connectivity.  4 Credits.  

This course takes a multifaceted look at one of the world’s most populous states and its evolving economic and strategic relationships with great powers, the Middle East, and the wider Asia-Pacific. The first major theme of the course is the way in which Pakistan has been shaped by — and, at times, has induced — crises throughout its history. From its wars with India, to its turbulent relationship with the United States, to its own internal uprisings, Pakistan has rarely been at peace with itself or its neighbors. The second theme of the course explores Pakistan’s role as a fulcrum between the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific, with particular emphasis on its relationship with China and the multi-billion dollar energy, infrastructure, and connectivity investments being planned under the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor; Pakistan’s complex ties to the Gulf states; and its evolving relationships with Russia and Iran. This course includes a practical focus on policy writing.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.790.727.  India's Challenges and the Future of a Sixth of Humanity.  4 Credits.  

Since its independence, India has been the world’s largest democracy and second largest country, but an extremely poor country as well. However, in a few years India will emerge as the world’s largest country with a sixth of the world’s population and in a decade it is poised to emerge as the third largest economy riding on the back of nearly four decades of strong economic growth. But India faces many challenges. While some are endemic, others are growing. Many of these – political, economic and institutional – are internal and are shaped by India’s multiple social cleavages. Others are more external, stemming from the geopolitics of its neighborhood or the long-term challenges of climate change. The seminar will examine the principal challenges facing India: political and institutional; economic growth; poverty and inequality; demographic; urbanization; natural resources and climate change; and geopolitical.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.790.728.  Security Challenges & Military Modernization in South Asia.  4 Credits.  

South Asia is home to two of the world’s largest militaries, the world’s leading arms importer, several major ethnic, religious, and nationalist insurgencies, an array of sophisticated terrorist groups, and two nuclear-armed powers that engage in frequent border skirmishes. This course takes a systematic and in-depth look at how states manage security challenges in this complex region. Topics include analysis of foreign policy decision-making processes and civil-military dynamics; the rise (and export) of Islamic extremism; comparative perspectives on counterinsurgency campaigns undertaken by India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka; India’s efforts at military modernization and preparations for China-related contingencies; and the ways in which evolving strategic capabilities and doctrines might affect the risk of nuclear escalation. This course includes a practical focus on policy writing.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.790.729.  Economic Development and Policy in India.  4 Credits.  

The main aim of this course is to familiarize students with India’s economy. We will discuss some of the principal themes in the India’s economic development, its integration in the world economy, the political economy of reforms and growth, as well as India’s institutional development. By the end of the course, students should be able think critically about Indian economic developments and related policy issues.We will begin by assessing India’s economic evolution in her post-independence years, placing particular emphasis on the market oriented reforms undertaken in recent decades. Topics in both microeconomics (domestic de-regulation, trade reform, sectoral shifts from agriculture to industry and services, education and health) and macroeconomics (deficits, debt and crises, the exchange rate, inflation and monetary policy) will be covered. In addition, we will discuss the structure of Indian economic and political institutions and their impact on economic performance. We will focus on both conceptual issues in economics and their application in the Indian setting; this course is intended for students interested in the Indian economy as well as those interested, more broadly, in the economic issues that arise in developing countries with diversified economies and a complex political economy.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.790.724[C]

SA.790.820.  Comparative Political & Economic Development in South Asia.  4 Credits.  

Introduces the political development of South Asian states (including Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka). The subcontinent has a growing relevance in international politics, and domestic developments play a significant role in determining the external policies of the various regional states. The course draws on South Asian examples to elaborate on themes relevant to the general study of political change in other developing countries: democracy, governance and civil society, state institutions, the press, federalism, political parties, religion in political development, identities and new nationalisms, social movements, the politics of gender issues and the politics of economic reform.<a href="https://jh.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=da8bf644-8111-414a-9d1f-a872013e8cf4" target="_blank">Click here to see a video introduction for the course.</a><a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>