SA.760.702.  Introduction to the Japanese Economy.  4 Credits.  

Provides an overview of the modern Japanese economy. Starts with a brief look at the economic history of Japan, then covers other topics, including the relationship among savings, investment and trade, industrial structure and industrial policy. Concludes with a consideration of the role and outlook of the Japanese economy in the world. Some outside reading in macroeconomic theory may be required for students who are new to the study of economics.<a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/resources/administrative-offices/how-access-course-syllabi-and-evaluations" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.760.705.  The US, Japan and China in Global Affairs.  4 Credits.  

The United States, China, and Japan have the three largest economies in the world, and account among them for nearly half of global energy consumption, international trade, and CO2 emissions. The course explores their complicated triangular economic and security relations, while considering broader implications for world affairs. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.760.706.  Infrastructure and Transpacific Cooperation.  4 Credits.  

This course will explore in detail the major infrastructural challenges facing major industrial nations, particularly Japan and the United States over the coming two decades, as well as the ways in which these countries can cooperate in addressing those challenges. The key challenges addressed will include high-speed rail transportation; smart grids for electric-power transmission; cyber-secure telecommunications infrastructure; aviation and air transport; and the refurbishing of urban civil infrastructure, including roads and bridges.Attention will be given in the course both to identifying best practice in the target countries, as well as modalities for exchanging information on such practices; and to financing state of the art infrastructure. Comparison between Western paradigms and China’s Belt and Road Initiative will be undertaken. A variety of financial alternatives for infrastructure finance will be considered, including corporate funding; government supported funding, including subsidies and development bank finance; as well as innovative mixed public-private partnerships, including build, operate, and transfer prospects.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.760.707.  Public Diplomacy and U.S.-Japan Cooperation.  4 Credits.  

Public diplomacy is one of the most poorly understood instruments of foreign policy. This course aims to fill that knowledge gap by examining this important “soft-power” tool as a concept and how it is being put into practice, focusing on Japan, its successes and challenges. The course covers such informational outreach and cultural exchange programs as “Cool Japan,” such cultural exports as manga, anime and traditional arts, the use of the media and the Internet, people-to-people diplomacy, language programs, and educational exchanges. In evaluating the efficacy of such programs, particularly in the U.S.-Japan context, the course examines recent government campaigns to enhance Japan’s image and identity abroad. References also will be made to the public diplomacy programs of the United States, China, and South Korea.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.760.708.  SINO-Japanese Relations.  4 Credits.  
SA.760.709.  The U.S., Japan, and Great Power Competition in Southeast Asia.  4 Credits.  

The class will view Japanese, American, and Chinese behavior in Southeast Asia through the lenses of history, great power competition, and grand strategy to consider whether a stable regional order can emerge in a region of growing strategic importance.

SA.760.741.  Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy.  4 Credits.  

An introduction to modern Japanese politics and public policy, considering prospects for major changes in security and economic policy of global importance. After a general introduction to Japanese political development since 1868, undertakes more detailed analysis of current political structure and processes as well as of domestic and foreign policy issues. Emphasizes understanding how domestic and international politics influence the functioning of the Japanese economy, especially in the current historic period of political economic change.<a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/resources/administrative-offices/how-access-course-syllabi-and-evaluations" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.760.745.  Japan's Demographically-Driven Health Care Crisis.  4 Credits.  

This course, unique to Johns Hopkins, examines in detail through lectures, discussions, and workshop reports, the growing crisis in Japan’s otherwise world-class healthcare system and social services programs, driven by a rapidly aging population with fewer babies being born, as well as an inadequacy of facilities and human resources to deal with the demographic changes. After a historical introduction to Japan’s healthcare policy and system, along with changes in the society over time, instructor and students will engage in workshop-like dialogues on specific issues such as current public policies and countermeasures, how Japan compares to other countries like the United States, the impact of the demographic crisis on Japan’s cradle-to-grave universal healthcare system and social services, Japan’s growing mental-health crisis, including dementia, and where Japan stands in advanced medical research and treatment.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.760.749.  US-Japan Relations in Global Context.  4 Credits.  

Examines the evolution of the U.S.-Japan strategic relationship in a changing global and regional geopolitical environment. Gives special attention to the U.S.-Japan alliance and relations with China and the Korean Peninsula. Involves substantial direct dialogue with policymakers, analysts and business leaders, both American and Japanese. The class includes extensive travel study, and students are expected to write a policy-oriented research paper on economic, political, technological or security issues in U.S.-Japan relations, the best of which are published by the Edwin O. Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies in both the English and Japanese languages. Students should have basic knowledge of Japanese diplomacy before taking this course. Taking Japanese Pol & Pub Policy SA.760.741 OR Intro to Japanese Economy SA.760.702 is highly recommended.IMPORTANT: There is limited space available for the associated field trip. All students may register for this class. Those who wish to attend the field trip must submit your cover letter to reischauer@jhu.edu for consideration.<a href="https://jh.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=ab6802aa-6152-4f1b-8f4c-a8720140090b" target="_blank">Click here to see a video introduction for the course.</a><a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.760.750.  The Japanese and Korean Political Economies in Comparative Perspective.  4 Credits.  

This course examines the organization and functioning of Asia's two largest and most advanced capitalist political economies. The course begins with a survey of underlying similarities and differences in structure and performance, including political-party competition, industrial-group structure, regionalism, business-government networks, industrial policy, labor relations, and economic performance. Considers historical and international reasons for prevailing profiles, and prospects for future national evolution, response to globalization, and bilateral interdependence.<a href="https://jh.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=8017998c-6378-412e-bdb4-a872013ef037" target="_blank">Click here to see a video introduction for the course.</a><a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.760.751.  History of Japans Emergence as a World Power: From Isolation to Global Integration.  4 Credits.  

Explores the historical development of modern Japan from its origins in the late 19th century to the collapse of the bubble economy in the early 1990s. Emphasizes the cultural, intellectual, economic, political and social factors that shaped Japan’s response to the West and its rise as a world power in the late 19th and 20th centuries.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>