SA.610.700.  International Political Economy of Emerging Markets.  4 Credits.  

This course examines the relationship between politics and international economics in developing countries, with a focus on the emerging market economies. Throughout the course, we critically evaluate different political science theories of foreign economic policymaking in emerging markets. The course begins with an overview of theories of international political economy. The second section of the course focuses on developing countries’ embrace of economic globalization over the past thirty years. We examine different political reasons for why emerging market and developing countries have liberalized foreign trade, removed barriers to foreign investment, and reduced the state’s role in the domestic economy since the 1980s. The final section of the course of the course explores how globalization has impacted emerging market economies, and considers how governments in these countries have dealt with the new challenges that have emerged in this era of economic globalization. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.610.701.  Political Economy of Inequality.  4 Credits.  

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SA.610.702.  Political Economy in the Shadow of Conflict.  4 Credits.  

This is a research seminar organized around key ongoing debates in international relations, such as the role of institutions, audience costs, leaders, bargaining, reputation, interdependence, and ideas. The course will emphasize critical engagement of the empirical evidence presented in favor of theoretical arguments, encouraging students to devise rigorous new ways to test their observable implications. Can bargaining theory help us understand the outbreak, as well as the termination of, international conflict? Has growing economic integration among states changed the nature of military conflict? Are certain economic interest groups more prone to support military expansion than others? Do democratic institutions enable states to better signal their resolve to adversaries? By the end of the course, students will be able to recognize, engage, and develop their own taste for theoretical arguments, as well as present the most compelling empirical evidence for or against them.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): SA.100.761[C] OR SA.100.998[C]

SA.610.703.  Watching Wall Street from Washington: Financial Market Analysis for the Public Sector.  4 Credits.  

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SA.610.704.  International and Comparative Political Economy of Developing Countries.  4 Credits.  

This course welcomes any student pursuing a degree at SAIS. The main aim of the course is the study of the main international and domestic factors behind the economic and political development and under-development of the countries in the world that are not identified or categorized as ‘advanced’ or ‘mature’ capitalist economies.While the focus of the course is on countries that are not considered rich or developed (most countries in the regions of Latin America, Asia, Africa, the Middle East), we will refer to and use material throughout the course that also covers the rich countries and emerging market ones inasmuch as: 1) they were once underdeveloped or have developed recently, and this experience sheds light on those that have not managed to develop or ‘catch up’; and 2) their own growth and development has been in many cases a cause why others have remained undeveloped (i.e. colonialism, imperialism, dependency).The main analytical tools for the study of the international component come from concepts, theories, case studies, and data from the sub-field of International Political Economy (IPE). In turn, the main tools for the study of the domestic component of developing countries come from the sub-field of Comparative Political Economy (CPE).Hence, the course identifies key overlapping international and domestic factors that have led some countries to be poorer, less developed and more vulnerable than the advanced or mature capitalist ones.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.610.705.  Politics of North American Economic Integration.  4 Credits.  

As the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) after 25 years demonstrated, economic linkages in North America continue to be contested politically at the national and subnational level. The proposed update, the United States Mexico Canada Agreement, would recommit to deepening continental economic integration while retaining the NAFTA model’s governance structure: sovereign governments negotiate regulatory and border security cooperation on an ongoing basis and conduct investment, intellectual property, and monetary policy independently. Students in this course will explore the governance of economic flows among the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The course will evaluate how important sectors have adapted supply chains and market strategies in response to regional economic integration and how economic partners outside North America—like China, the European Union, and Japan—operate in the North American market.

SA.610.717.  Politics of International Economy.  4 Credits.  

How does globalization affect state power? The course examines how market outcomes shape both politics and economics. Develops a dynamic understanding of international political economy and assesses its impact in rich/poor gap models, inequality questions, the convergences of productivity, and problems of trade liberalization and neomercantilism. Applications include state breakup, the oil dilemma and currency crises. Uses this dynamic approach to identify key regional problems in North America, Europe and Asia and to offer policy solutions.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.610.732.  International Political Economy.  4 Credits.  

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.600.732.

SA.610.735.  Risk in International Politics and Economics.  4 Credits.  

The purpose of this course is to help students work through the challenge of understanding risk in international political and economic relations. That challenge is both methodological and substantive. Students will have to tackle ‘how’ we understand and ‘what’ we understand at the same time. Along the way, they will have to consider those things we cannot understand or anticipate with any meaningful degree of precision. They will have to deal with the ‘uncertainty’ that lies beyond the boundaries of ‘risk’. The subject matter is open-ended. Virtually every aspect of politics or economics can be cast in terms of risk and uncertainty, no matter whether we look to the future or reflect upon the past. Therefore, the course builds on a thematically structured, case study approach. Each week introduces a new principle that is useful in understanding risk; each week provides cases that illustrate the usefulness of that new principle. Moreover, as our understanding of risk becomes more sophisticated, the cases become more complex. The ultimate goal is to be able to analyze matters of risk and uncertainty as they manifest around decisions taken by leaders in government or business in the real world.

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.600.735.

SA.610.736.  Advanced Topics in International Political Economy.  4 Credits.  

This advanced course aims to fully integrate your knowledge of international economics with international relations, and bridge the gap between the two disciplines. The course aims to immerse students into the latest and cutting-edge approaches to the study of international political economy (IPE). The main goal is to apply those various theories to important historical and contemporary empirical issues in IPE. The first part of the course examines the main theoretical concepts in and methodological approaches to political economy, emphasizing the dynamic interplay between the domestic and international economy on the one hand, and domestic and international politics on the other. We will study both the classic IPE literature as well as more recent theoretical developments, including the comparative and domestic approaches that have become increasingly prominent in the academic literature. The second and third parts of the course address the politics of international trade and international monetary relations respectively, while the final part of the course delves into the origins, causes, aftermath, and consequences of the most recent international economic and financial crises. Prerequisites: International Trade Theory, International Monetary Theory, and Statistics.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): SA.340.709[C] OR SA.999.702[C] OR SA.999.709[C] OR SA.310.770[C];( SA.300.707[C] OR SA.300.851[C] OR SA.310.707[C] ) AND ( SA.300.708[C] OR SA.300.852[C] OR SA.310.724[C] )

SA.610.740.  Political and Economic Challenges in Energy and the Environment.  4 Credits.  

This course is an introduction to the burgeoning literature in international political economy (IPE) that addresses energy and the environment. It provides students with an opportunity to address substantive challenges, such as those presented by national oil and gas companies, state-owned utilities, allocation of petrodollars, fossil fuel subsidies, environmental adaptation, renewable technology innovation, barriers to energy efficiency, and energy poverty, using social scientific tools of IPE to produce original research and policy prescriptions. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.610.752.  Major Ideas in Modern Political Economy.  4 Credits.  

Discussion class that provides a historical survey of major writers who have shaped economic and political thought from the late 18th century to the present. Close reading of classic texts from Rousseau, Smith, Ricardo, Coleridge, List, Marx, Lenin, J.S. Mill. Keynes, Schumpeter and Hayek. Addresses cultural context and general world views. Requires frequent short papers. Useful for relating economics and politics and putting economic doctrines in general historical and philosophical context.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.600.752[C]

SA.610.770.  Comparative Political Economy.  4 Credits.  

This course is intended to bridge the gap between economics and politics as taught at SAIS. First examines some of the main “currents” in the literature and familiarizes the student with different variants of political economy. Presents an overview of the classical liberal, Marxian/Polanyian and Keynesian understandings of the economy, each of which serves as both a primer to political economy and as an introduction to the main contemporary approaches. Then engages with what many scholars argue is the major approach in comparative political economy: rational choice theory. By contrast, the next section looks beyond the rationalist tradition to the nowadays somewhat neglected historical tradition. Building on the historical tradition, next examines institutionalist approaches, explaining institutional change and stability over time through path dependence and earlier arrangements. Concludes with more social constructivist understandings of political economy, emphasizing the powerful role of economic ideas in the evolution of economic policymaking over time.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.600.770[C]

SA.710.808.  European Research Seminar.  4 Credits.  

Through a rotation of topics and case studies, this course explores the unique and useful perspectives on domestic politics and foreign policy in Europe. Learning objectives are fulfilled by providing analytical tools, empirical content, and research skills to enrich students’ knowledge of European politics and society in general.