SA.400.700.  Practical Research Methods for International Development.  4 Credits.  

Covers a range of practical tools for development-related information gathering, including for project planning, design and evaluation. Grounded in survey and interview skills, also reviews participatory approaches, rapid appraisal, action research and many other techniques. Gives special attention to methods suitable for low budgets, limited time and nonprofessional management staff. Makes extensive use of real-world cases. Includes a team-based practicum in Washington. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.722.  Pol Systems of the Developing World.  4 Credits.  
SA.400.724.  Venture Capital and Impact Investing in Emerging Markets.  4 Credits.  

Venture capital and impact investing in emerging markets are growing rapidly as they seek to fund innovative products and services globally. However, many developing markets are thinly capitalized and have unique constraints, which make venture and impact investing in emerging markets a particularly tricky endeavor. Nonetheless, there are real opportunities to find innovators in all corners of emerging markets, and generate srong returns in the process. This course focuses on the intersection of venture capital and impact investing, and its specific application in the service of consciously creating impact. Given many of the early success stories, this class will focus primarily on financial inclusion, as it helps to demonstrate the progression of one impact investment sector that has had both early stage commercial VC support and multiple exits. The course explores what is happening today with the fintech revolution, as the financial services sector begins to digitize and is increasingly delivered via mobile phones. This focus on financial inclusion will highlight the power of investing to drive value creation, economic growth, and social returns. Students will have the opportunity to explore how investors develop focus areas and theses, source and evaluate investments, manage and grow a portfolio, drive towards exits, and manage challenges that arise through this process. Prerequisites include: either Corporate Finance (SA.380.760) or Leeds Private Equity in Emerging Markets OR enrollment in the Corporate Valuation: A Primer to Wall Street Valuation Methodologies course offered by SAIS Career Services.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): SA.380.760[C] OR SA.380.778[C] OR SA.310.722[C]

SA.400.727.  The International Financial Institutions: Case Studies in the Search for Relevance.  4 Credits.  

Through the use of case studies and simulations, a new four credit version of this course examines selected policies and programs of the major multilateral international financial institutions: the IMF, the World Bank and three major regional development banks (RDBs) : Asian Development Bank (AsDB), African Development Bank (AfDB), and the InterAmerican Development Bank (IADB), as well as the two newest MDBs – the BRICS New Development Bank (NDB) and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB). Topics to be covered include: role of the IFIs in private sector led growth and development; financial and operational innovations at the MDBs; reforming global governance: assessing the IMF governance reform agenda; analysis of the operational plans for the BRICs NDB and AIIB; the role of the IFIs in addressing climate change including the Green Climate Fund; measuring development impact: evaluations at the MDBs. Students work in teams on operational case studies, participate in a Board meeting simulation, deliver one individual and one group oral presentation and write a major paper on a topic based on individual student interests. Students with career interests that include working at or in partnership with the World Bank or the RDBs after graduation will find this course especially helpful.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.745.  Global Health Policy.  4 Credits.  

The world’s countries—low, middle and high-income alike—face numerous health challenges, many shaped by processes connected to globalization. These include combating the COVID-19 and HIV/AIDS pandemics, addressing non-communicable diseases, expanding health coverage and ensuring effective global governance for health. This course will examine these and other issues with an emphasis on facilitating your understanding and critical analysis of central issues in global health policy, and examining the role you can play to address health conditions—particularly those that affect disadvantaged populations.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.746.  Health Systems and Policy in Developing Countries.  4 Credits.  

A good health system delivers quality services to all people, when and where they need them. Components of a strong health system include a robust financing mechanism; a well-trained and adequately paid workforce; reliable information on which to base decisions and policies; and well-maintained facilities and logistics to deliver quality medicines and technologies. However, many countries in the developing world have weak health systems, badly in need of strengthening and reform. This course offers a practical introduction to major issues, policies and practices related to health systems and health policy in a developing country context. The course combines two perspectives. First, students will apply principles related to health systems strengthening and reform to develop a framework to strengthen and rebuild health systems in fragile states. Second, students will learn about and apply key insights from economics to understand health behaviors and health care markets, and to inform the design of health policy in low and middle-income countries. Students are expected to be comfortable reading articles that evaluate health system interventions as well as applied economics papers and think through the logic and implications of economic theory (without complicated statistics or math). Substantive preparation and class participation are expected.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.748.  International Migration, Diasporas and Development.  4 Credits.  

While there are fierce debates on the impact of immigration on advanced industrial countries, the effects of emigration and diasporas on the source country are poorly understood. This seminar will seek to understand the economic, political and social consequences of international migration and diasporas on countries of origin. Is the phenomenon of greater import in the current (and future) context than it has historically been and if so, why? How do selection characteristics of international migrants and reasons for leaving – whether as students, workers or refugees – affect the country of origin? What are the human capital effects ranging from the “brain-drain” of limited human capital to “brain-gain” effects arising and social norms and thereby influence social and political change? When do diasporas engage in “long- distance” nationalism that support more polar political parties and groups from diasporic networks? What are the different forms of economic engagement of diasporas with their countries of origin, ranging from remittances to trade to FDI, and why do these vary? Do diasporas transmit "social" remittances which reshape individual preferences engaged in conflict and civil wars? And what are the effects of destination country policies on immigrant selection, assimilation and deportation on the above questions?<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.749.  Improving Service Delivery in Developing Countries.  4 Credits.  

Basic services such as drinking water, sanitation, solid waste management and public transport are essential to development, yet in many countries their provision remains extremely problematic. In this course we review the main challenges to effective and reliable service delivery, roles of key players and how these roles have been changing over time. We begin by discussing the role of the state in service provision, why some services are harder to provide, or some populations more difficult to serve. Next, we focus on four sectors—drinking water, sanitation, solid waste and public transport. Problems specific to each sector, policies and programs used to address these challenges, to what extent they have been successful and why, and what approaches may work in the future, will be discussed. Innovations in service delivery—clearer incentives for regular service provision, strengthening municipal financing, integrating the private sector and communities into service provision, will be highlighted. Students will study the costs associated with service delivery; service delivery planning; tools used for benchmarking utilities; and innovations in financing services.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.750.  Social Entrepreneurship: Driving Innovation in Development.  4 Credits.  

Social Entrepreneurship: Driving Innovation in Development is focused on understanding social entrepreneurship and the challenges of building sustainable, impactful businesses that address critical underserved needs in emerging global marketplaces.The course aims to create in each student an appreciation of the qualities, values and skills of social entrepreneurs and also entrepreneurial opportunities in critical sectors of human need in complex, resource-constrained markets that are plagued by fragmented infrastructure, inadequate institutions and other governance challenges. Students will learn first-hand how businesses serving the needs of the poor contribute to community development and “do well by doing good”. The capstone project in the course is a group presentation based on a partnership with an existing social enterprise, or a newly conceptualized social enterprise based on student ideas.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.752.  Comparative Public Management.  4 Credits.  

This course will explore how the public sector sets policy and delivers services, focusing on both the administrative realm, and the underlying political incentives. The approach will be comparative, and will range from analysis of public sector performance and its history in today’s high income countries, to the determinants of public sector performance in contemporary, institutionally weak, low-income settings. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.753.  Reimagining International Development for Children and Youth.  4 Credits.  

There are well over two billion children and youth in the world with half living in poverty. Threats to human security are already leading to social disruption in many parts of the world. Investing in education, healthcare, protection, and future economic opportunities for future generations is vital for building a safer, productive, and prosperous society. This course will enable students to have an overview on issues affecting young people’s lives at the intersection of poverty and globalization. The course will have a heavy focus on social innovations that have been developed and implemented to support the most vulnerable young people globally. It will also examine many dynamic policies that deal effectively with these issues.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.756.  Public-Private Partnerships: Investing in Emerging Economies.  4 Credits.  

The course has been designed to help students understand what public value can be created and what complex public policy problems can be addressed by employing the techniques and structures used in public-private partnerships (PPPs). Public-Private Partnerships are collaborative structures supported by public, private or even non-profit partners who agree to share risks, resources and decisions in building and implementing certain projects. PPPs address issues with financing, operational capacity, inadequate human capital. The parties to a solution may share powerful motivations to create public value by addressing a particular problem but may not agree on how it should be addressed, by whom, at what risk, and for what incentives.The course will discuss how the integration of economic and social PPPs can improve a country’s competitiveness. While economic PPPs are created to address strategic economic development goals, social PPPs focus more on assets that lack adequate revenue sources and require subsidies. An increasing number of countries are seeking a fusion of economic and social PPPs, especially with regard to water, education, and healthcare. The skills needed to effectively develop and integrate economic and social PPPs include negotiation, political management, innovation, and financial structuring. Case studies and readings will be used to illustrate the wide spectrum of situations and challenges associated with managing PPPs and the types of issues that will benefit from PPPs in international development. NOTE: Prerequisite may be taken concurrently.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): SA.380.760[C] OR SA.380.778[C] OR SA.310.722[C]

SA.400.759.  Financial Inclusion.  4 Credits.  

"There are 3 billion people around the world that are left out of the formal financial system. The financial excluded, many of whom are low-income, do not have access to the products they need to live stable lives and take advantage of opportunities. They may not have access to a secure savings account, credit to build their business or insurance in the case of a health emergency. The delivery of quality financial services (loans, savings, insurance, money transfers) at affordable costs to all segments of society is, accordingly, an important policy goal in closing the income gap and improving quality of life.Over the years, both this topic has shifted from “microcredit” to “microfinance” to now a broader focus on “financial inclusion.” We will discuss the origins and evolution of this industry, moving from covering key players (Clients, Operators, Investors and Policy-Makers) to core trends, and key questions, driving the future of financial inclusion (including Fintech, Financial Health and Data). We will hear from several guest lecturers who are experts within their fields and bring first-hand experience in a range of topics - from managing a scaled operation to offering digital products to assessing investments from a VC perspective.Course assignments are intended to teach practical skills and critical thinking about financial systems and the unbanked, designing products for the poor, managing financial services or “fintech” businesses, and major debates about impact, commercialization, and future trends. For any student interested in deepening their understanding of Financial Inclusion or with an interest in social enterprise, to which Microfinance was a precursor in many ways, this is the course for you. The course is complementary to SA.400.724.01 Impact Investing in Emerging Markets, offered in the Spring.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.762.  Gender Inequality and Development.  2 Credits.  

Taught by Jeni Klugman, Fellow Women and Public Policy Program Harvard Kennedy School and Managing Director, Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security, and former Director, Gender and Development, The World Bank, the objectives of this seminar are broadly two-fold: first, to gain a solid understanding of the patterns and constraints of gender inequality around the world up to the present day, and second, to review and debate what we know and don’t know about what policies and programs can work to close gender gaps, with a focus on developing countries. The course is set up around a series of major policy questions central to the gender equality agenda, and linked to international development debates around the 2030 Agenda. Following an overview session about global and regional patterns, each of the subsequent weeks will tackle a series of major policy topics in turn, concluding with an examination of major global proposals to tackle gender inequality. The course will go beyond gender inequality in the labor market to explore patterns of violence, constraints to political participation, among others. Students will be asked to work on a specific policy challenge in a developing country context, applying and developing the findings discussed in class and in the readings. The course is designed to facilitate student questioning, engagement and participation as reflected in the structure and course requirements. No specific textbook is prescribed. There will normally be 2-3 required readings each week -- a paper and/or book chapters -- and additional readings for greater depth.This is a 2 credit class to be paired with Reimagining International Development for Children and Youth.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.766.  China in Africa.  4 Credits.  

This course critically examining China's rapidly growing economic, political and social ties with African countries. What drives these ties? How do they reflect China's "Going Global" thrust? What impact is Chinese engagement having on development prospects in other countries? What is myth, and what is reality? How is this engagement changing? Comparisons with Chinese engagement in Asia and the Americas. All students will write an original research paper.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.767.  Inclusive and Sustainable Urban Development.  4 Credits.  

As centers of power, innovation, growth and dynamism, cities have long created identities for entire countries and even regions. They have attracted those who come in search of jobs, education and a chance at making good on a dream and been havens for those fleeing violence and persecution. But from Baltimore and Cape Town to Paris and Rio, the consequence of urban poverty, inequality, exclusion and vulnerability have come into sharp focus this year. It’s becoming evident that upward mobility is becoming a distant dream for many who remain trapped in intergenerational poverty in even the wealthiest cities. Weak and underfunded local governments which struggle to protect their citizens during disease epidemics and natural disasters must contend with additional climate change related vulnerabilities. But in the midst of all the chaos and turmoil, individuals hold on to signs of progress and change; making daily sacrifices so that their children will have a shot at a better future. In this class we examine how urbanization is unfolding in middle and low-income countries in South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America, looking specifically at the causes and consequences of vulnerability including patterns of migration, informality and access to services. We critically examine the incentives and capacity of local governments to provide services to the poor by studying municipal budgets and new pro-poor financing models. We look at case studies of innovative solutions offered by entrepreneurial individuals and civic groups to the challenges that they see in their own communities. In the final classes we study the issues of informality and unemployment in urban areas of sub-Saharan Africa; migration and industrialization in East and South Asia; and inequality and violence in the Americas.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.769.  Humanitarianism, Aid & Politics.  4 Credits.  

Over the past 20 years, the attention given to the humanitarian consequences of conflict has grown considerably, not least due to advances in media technology. These consequences are multiple and transnational: civilian casualties, insecurity and human rights abuses, population displacement and attendant health impacts, food insecurity, damage to traditional political and economic structures—what some have called “development in reverse”. The human toll of these conflicts--sometimes fueled by natural resources such as oil, water, land, diamonds, timber, or poppy-- has placed substantial public pressure on donor governments and aid agencies to respond with ever more rapid and effective assistance. The resulting relief programs in turn carry real political repercussions, locally and internationally.The course examines these political repercussions. It provides a foundation for understanding the context of conflict and humanitarian crises, laying out such components as the nature of conflict, forced migration, humanitarian law, how the international aid community functions, and the use of militaries in humanitarian interventions. It also follows current trends in humanitarian action, tracking the role and use of Western aid agencies, the changes arising from counter terrorism policies, and the dynamics of specific crises<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.771.  Migration and Security.  4 Credits.  

The Course will provide a brief overview of current challenges linked to both forced and voluntary migration and then proceed to examine and discuss how we can balance political, economic, legal and institutional issues linked to state as well as human security in the interest of a better national, regional and global management of migratory movements.

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.650.726[C]

SA.400.772.  Digital Development: Innovative Use of Technology in Emerging Markets.  4 Credits.  

The aim of this course is to provide students with a practical, relevant framework to apply participatory and principled approaches to deploying information and communications technologies (ICTs) and digital tools to meet international development goals and improve outcomes in low and middle income countries (LMICs). The course will equip students with the skills and knowledge they need to understand and contribute to the field of technology for development (T4D). Each session will include an introduction to relevant foundational knowledge that will provide an entry point whereby technologies such as mobile phones, sensors, drones and tablets can be designed and deployed to address problems in health, education, agriculture, governance and environmental sustainability. Cross-cutting themes such as information security, policy, gender, and M&E will also be explored. Students will have an understanding of the constraints and benefits of integrating technology into development programs through participatory, hands-on development of a project plan and budget.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.774.  Financial Crises, Emerging Markets and Policy Dilemmas.  4 Credits.  

This course addresses policy issues in emerging markets with a particular focus on financial crises and their implications. Over the last several years, we have witnessed a number of episodes of financial distress often leading to macroeconomic chaos, particularly in emerging markets. Financial fragility and market distress can come in many forms: Currency crises, banking crises, debt crises, or a mix of two or more of these crises. The purpose of this course is to provide students with frameworks and tools for analyzing the causes and consequences of financial fragilities and crises, as well as the policy responses they entail. To this end, the course will mix economic theory, country experiences, and actual policy responses to provide an in-depth understanding of the boom-bust cycles characteristic of emerging market economies. The course will also address the 2008 financial crisis, drawing on aspects that make this particular episode stand out from previous instances of turmoil. Emerging market policy responses to the 2008 crisis, as well as the effects on these countries of unconventional policy stimulus adopted by developed economies will also be discussed.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): ( SA.300.699[C] OR SA.300.700[C] OR SA.310.700[C] OR SA.999.699[C] OR SA.999.700[C] ) AND ( SA.300.708[C] OR SA.300.852[C] )

SA.400.776.  Managing and Delivering Development Assistance.  4 Credits.  

International development is big business; OECD estimates over 210 billion USD in concessional development financing was disbursed by members of the OECD Development Assistance Committee in 2013. This course will explore the effectiveness of various kinds of external interventions. This course’s particular focus is on the political economy of aid and ‘big development’ – development interventions as practiced by the World Bank, IMF, and major bilateral donors. This course takes a systems-level perspective, exploring the determinants of aid flows and the effectiveness of aid interventions. While doing so it aims to provide practical content for those interested in the management of development activities – in employment in the world of international aid. In the view of this course, there is much that can be learned about the management and effectiveness of aid from drawing on broader theory. Throughout this course applications to aid draw on broader theory regarding public management and bureaucratic politics, among other disciplines. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.777.  Rural Development: Issues for 21st Century Livelihoods.  4 Credits.  

Rural development suggests overall development of rural areas with a view to improve the quality of life of rural people. It is a comprehensive and multidimensional process, involving the reorganization and reorientation of both economic and social systems that encompasses the development of agriculture and allied activities; cottage industries; socio-economic infrastructure; community services and facilities; and human resources in rural areas. This course is designed to enable students to better understand world poverty and hunger in the context of rural settings, and of varying perspectives, issues and challenges of rural development approaches in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals. Major issues include the growing diversity of livelihood strategies; rural poverty in low potential areas; the imperative need for stronger social protection; conflict resolution and management; the crisis of communicable and non-communicable diseases; and institutional capacity and governance. Major challenges include globalization and trade; urbanization; the 'de-agrarianization' of rural landscapes; rural risks, vulnerability and conflict; climate change and variability the increasing diversity of rural environments; and the special problems of low potential areas - in particular, small-scale farming may be facing unprecedented and unmanageable pressures. These issues and challenges will be examined through different roles, responsibilities and accountabilities including public sector, private sector, local institutions, and civil society.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.778.  Labor Market Policies in Developing Countries: Rethinking Approaches in a Global Age.  4 Credits.  

This course will advance student learning on labor markets in developing countries and examine the range of policies that can be employed to improve employment outcomes and human capital development.

SA.400.780.  Global Food Systems and Policy.  4 Credits.  

This course is designed to help students examine food policy and the political landscape of food in high-, middle-, and low-income countries. Ensuring food security for the growing, global population is a grand challenge and one that has many contentious issues. Conflicts regarding land, technology, natural resources, subsidies, inequity, and trade are all being played out in the food policy arena. Some argue, that to effectively address food security, global food systems must be efficient, equitable, and sustainable. However, the political framing of how food systems are designed, function, and governed are determined by a complex set of networks of individuals and institutions with vested interests. This course will expand students’ knowledge of global food systems and the policies that impact global food security, human nutrition, and broader aspects of health, food safety, economics, and the environment. Students who take this course will analyze both domestic and international food policy processes along with the key players involved in global food governance.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.781.  Strategic and Humanitarian Dilemmas: Syria.  4 Credits.  

The course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to examine complex crises, using the example of Syria – this century’s worst humanitarian disaster. It provides students with an in-depth understanding of the dynamics driving the war and the policy dilemmas that have shaped the international response, along with tools for addressing similar dilemmas in other conflict and post-conflict environments in the Middle East and beyond. Topics of interest to IDEV students include (1) options for civilian protection, (2) the politicization of humanitarian assistance, (3) the regional and European refugee crises, and (4) the challenges of post-conflict reconstruction and development. Whereas government agencies and non-governmental organizations tend to view complex crises through their own distinct lenses, students will be encouraged to develop a holistic perspective, assess policy trade-offs, and formulate recommendations that bridge the divide between diplomats, the military, and development and humanitarian professionals.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.782.  Geoeconomic Strategy: Policy at the Nexus of Macroeconomics, Geopolitics and Financial Markets.  4 Credits.  

This course explores policy issues at the intersection of macroeconomics, geopolitics, and financial markets. Specifically, students will analyze three related trends: (1) leverage of economic influence and market instruments (“economic statecraft") by national actors to advance geopolitical goals; (2) conduct of foreign policy to support economic objectives; and (3) the potential re-shaping of the international order as a result of overusing the tools of economic statecraft. The course will begin by briefly reviewing the tools of economic statecraft and foreign policy, as well as conventional models of the global macroeconomy and international relations, before turning to the study of specific topics: sovereign debt crises and great power conflict, the efficacy and limits of economic sanctions, China’s brand of economic statecraft, global macroeconomic imbalances/currency wars, the geoeconomics of energy and trade policy, next-generation financial stability risk, and the primacy of the dollar within the global economic architecture. Students should come equipped with a conceptual understanding of macroeconomics, finance, and international affairs. Most importantly, they should be ready to participate actively in class discussion.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.783.  From Poverty to Plenty: Policymaking for Global Progress.  4 Credits.  

Students will gain a greater understanding of the changing nature of global economic production and output over the past half century as well as the relative importance of the factors behind those trends. They will examine the global data on shifts in norms, the decline in inter-state war and their relationship to broad social, environmental and economic change. (This may be data heavy but will not require econometrics). They will analyze priorities and risks highlighted in policy documents including US National Security Strategies over time in the context of global change. Individual students will focus coursework in on a particular (set of) policy implication(s) around a foreign policy tool/global policy issue (for example, USAID, EU trade policy, IMF/Basel reform, Pentagon strategy and budgeting or WHO pandemic preparedness). Students will create a set of proposals all targeted at the same specific senior national or international policymaker in development, trade, defense, migration or diplomacy designed to improve strategy, policy or practice in international relations to take account of the age of plenty. The emphasis of student engagement and assessment will be on short policy memo writing and presentation.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.784.  Rural Development, Gender and Social Inclusion.  4 Credits.  
SA.400.785.  Reimagining International Development for Children and Youth.  2 Credits.  

There are well over two billion children and youth in the world with half living in poverty. Threats to human security are already leading to social disruption in many parts of the world. Investing in education, healthcare, protection, and future economic opportunities for future generations is vital for building a safer, productive, and prosperous society. This course will enable students to have an overview on issues affecting young people’s lives at the intersection of poverty and globalization. The course will have a heavy focus on social innovations that have been developed and implemented to support the most vulnerable young people globally. It will also examine many dynamic policies that deal effectively with these issues. This is a 2 credit class to be paired with Gender Inequality and Development.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.400.753[C]

SA.400.791.  Basic Education in Low and Middle Income Countries: Policy and Practice.  2 Credits.  

This course aims to introduce students to contemporary discussions on designing and delivering basic education (primary and lower secondary level) services in low and middle income countries. The course pays special attention to lessons learned for improving access to and quality of education. The readings focus primarily on basic education with some discussion on early childhood education and care. We begin this 2-credit course with a general introduction about the ongoing debates at the global and national level about the successes and shortcomings of recent interventions for improving basic education in low and middle income countries. During the second section of the course, we will have the opportunity to learn about both demand and supply-side obstacles to providing basic education to all children. During the third and major section of the course, we will examine the evidence about the effectiveness of a wide range of efforts at improving access to and quality of basic education, including but not limited to class size, teacher training, cash transfer, and technological interventions.The course is run as a seminar so the students are expected to do the assigned readings prior to each session. At the end of the course, students will have familiarity with both the pertinent academic literature on basic education interventions in low and middle income countries, and the key reports published by international development organizations. Students will also have the opportunity to practice their policy analysis skills through the policy memo assignments.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.794.  Public-Private Partnerships: Creating Public Value in Economic and Social Infrastructure.  2 Credits.  

The course has been designed to help students understand what public value can be created and what complex public policy problems can be addressed by employing the techniques and structures used in public-private partnerships (PPPs). Public-Private Partnerships are collaborative structures supported by public, private and other partners who agree to share risks, resources and decisions in building and implementing certain projects. PPPs address issues with financing, operational capacity, and human capital requirements. The parties to a solution may share motivations to create public value by addressing a particular problem but may not agree on how it should be addressed, by whom, at what risk, and for what incentives. The course will discuss how economic and social PPPs can improve a country’s competitiveness. While economic PPPs are created to address strategic economic development goals, social PPPs focus more on assets that lack adequate revenue sources and require subsidies. The skills needed to effectively develop economic and social PPPs include negotiation, political management, innovation, and financial structuring. Case studies and readings will be used to illustrate the wide spectrum of situations and challenges associated with managing PPPs and the types of issues that will benefit from PPPs in international development. This is a 2 credit class to be paired with Development Finance.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): SA.380.760[C];Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.400.756[C]

SA.400.807.  Introduction to Public Health for Development Practitioners.  4 Credits.  

This course offers a practical introduction to major issues, policies and practices of public health, and examines the role of health in development. The course teaches critical public health skills such as epidemiology, burden of disease studies, rapid assessments and outbreak investigations, enabling students to understand the basic tools of public health and to analyze strengths and weaknesses in public health studies. Furthermore, this course examines major public health topics of concern to development, including HIV/AIDS, malaria, neglected tropical diseases, maternal and child health, water and sanitation, and emerging diseases. This training will enable development practitioners act on the ground and in development institutions to improve global health. This course is designed as both a stand-alone primer on public health for those working in development, and as a foundation course for more advanced study of global health issues.<a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/resources/administrative-offices/how-access-course-syllabi-and-evaluations" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.809.  Principles of Evaluation for Development Projects.  4 Credits.  

This course will help students develop critical skills in applying methodologies and strategies for the evaluation of international development projects. It will provide the conceptual and theoretical framework to help students navigate decisions about the most appropriate tools for assessing project achievements and evaluating their impact through formative, process, and summative approaches. Students will learn to identify sound evaluation questions, develop logic models to assess their utility for project monitoring and evaluation (M&E), and select performance and evaluation indicators and apply these in qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods designs. The course will provide insight into how methodological choices influence research design, data interpretation, and the strength of evaluation results. Students will learn to critique reported program results against standards of validity, reliability, efficiency, and effectiveness and will gain skills relevant for research uptake, instructing students how to present findings in appropriate formats for diverse audiences. Students will also be challenged to navigate ethical dilemmas of evaluation in the context of international development programming and reflect on appropriate alternative designs. The course will include brief lectures, in-class exercises, plenary discussions, and small group sessions. Case studies will be used to review and compare the M&E practices of major donors (multi-laterals, bi-laterals, and private foundations) and to critically assess examples of good and bad practice. The final project will showcase students’ skills in designing a rigorous and appropriate evaluation to answer a real world development question.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.818.  Development Strategies.  4 Credits.  

Study of development reveals a range of proposals for economics, political and social reform and an equally wide range of constraints. But the challenge confronting development practitioners is to find a tractable and promising way forward, given country-specific realities. Drawing on a variety of emerging approaches to development policymaking, this course examines how to identify priorities for reform that are feasible in particular country circumstances and that have the potential to build and sustain momentum for development. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.819.  Financial Sector Developments and Reform in Emerging Markets.  4 Credits.  

Explores developments and policy issues in the financial structures of selected emerging-market economies, including the functioning of the bond market, the equity market and the banking system; the role of central banks and official oversight; and issues of information, corporate governance, privatization, risk management and legal foundations. Prerequisites: Microeconomics or Accelerated Microeconomics and Macroeconomics or Accelerated Macroeconomics. (This is a cross-listed course offered by the International Development Program that also can fulfill a requirement for the Latin American Studies and International Economics programs.) <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): SA.300.701[C] OR SA.300.706[C] OR SA.999.701[C];SA.300.699[C] OR SA.300.700[C] OR SA.300.704[C] OR SA.999.699[C] OR SA.999.700[C]

SA.400.821.  International Development Proseminar.  4 Credits.  

Serves as a topical introduction to development that seeks to integrate its economic, political and social dimensions. This course must be taken by all students concentrating in International Development during their first semester at SAIS, either in Washington or Bologna. This section of the gateway course is open to all SAIS students, with priority given to International Development Program concentrators. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.400.901.  International Development Practicum.  4 Credits.  

The practicum is a course designed to provide students with the tools and opportunity to work with an external client on a development problem or opportunity. It allows students the opportunity to apply their research, analysis and practical skills to an issue that is of direct relevance to a client. The team of students works closely with the client to produce a high quality output in the form of a publishable report, policy or program that may be implemented by the client. In addition to allowing students to translate their knowledge into practice, the practicum experience also allows students to make valuable contacts with potential employers. <a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/content/international-development#specializations-and-practicum " target="_blank">Click here for more information regarding the application process for the IDEV Practicum</a><a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>