SA.750.228.  Contemporary Chinese Politics.  4 Credits.  

Analyzes the domestic politics of the People’s Republic of China, with particular emphasis on the reform era. This introductory course covers political history, policy process and institutional issues, leadership and the challenge of socioeconomic modernization. Focuses on recurrent and substantive policy issues in Chinese politics.<a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/resources/administrative-offices/how-access-course-syllabi-and-evaluations" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.602.  China and International Law.  4 Credits.  

Over the past thirty years, China has gone from being one of the most isolated countries in the world to a major player in international affairs. Yet despite its growing power and influence, it maintains an ambivalent attitude towards international law and the liberal international order. This class will explore that ambivalence, and will in particular examine how China might adapt to the existing world order and the ways in which China will look to influence its evolution. The class will cover China’s approach to international peace and security, China’s membership in the WTO, Beijing’s engagement with the international human rights regime, and the South China Sea dispute, among other topics.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.701.  History and Political Conflict in Modern China.  4 Credits.  

Analyzes the complex relationship between history and politics in modern China. Examines how contending understandings of China’s history shaped policy decisions made by Chinese leaders and how those leaders in turn attempted to forge a history to serve their interests. Explores traditional concepts of political legitimacy, the Western intrusion and the evolution of Chinese nationalism, the Nationalist interregnum, the Communist Party’s rise to power, Mao Zedong’s rule and Deng Xiaoping's reform and opening policy.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.706.  China and International Organizations: Perspectives on China and Global Governance.  4 Credits.  

China's growing global influence is increasingly experienced in international collective responses to global challenges. This research seminar enables students to develop through reading, discussion and original research an understanding of China’s changing role in international organizations and evolving mechanisms of global governance.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.717.  U.S.-China Relations.  4 Credits.  

Examines U.S. policy toward China and specific U.S.-Chinese political, economic, cultural and security relations, with emphasis on the post-1949 period. Gives special attention to the foreign policy processes in each nation, recurrent policy issues and their implications for each nation’s behavior, and relations with third parties.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.728.  Grass Roots China.  4 Credits.  

Examines the dramatic social changes brought about by China’s rapid economic growth and explores the implications of rapid urbanization due to massive rural-to-urban migration, the decline of state-owned enterprises, the growth of a consumer society, the spread of corruption and the continuing search for new values. Addresses the possible evolution of civil society, focusing on the rise of religious belief, the increasing number of NGOs and the introduction of competitive elections at the village level.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.729.  The Turbulent Triangle: Taiwan, China and the United States.  4 Credits.  

Examines Taiwan’s economic and political development, with comparisons to other Asian societies. Investigates Taiwan’s unique international status and its complex sense of identity. Studies the development of cross-strait relations as well as PRC and U.S. policies toward Taiwan. Assesses the prospects for cooperation or confrontation in cross-strait relations.<a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/resources/administrative-offices/how-access-course-syllabi-and-evaluations" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.733.  China's Policies for Resources and the Environment.  4 Credits.  

Severe environmental degradation threatens China's future economic development and affects other societies globally. Through the study of key natural resource sectors, this course examines the ways in which the Chinese state has managed these sectors, emphasizing the interaction between the central government and localities. Also considers the roles played by such non-state actors as NGOs, ethnic groups and individual citizens and addresses the domestic and international political implications of the environmental challenges China faces. (This is a cross-listed course offered by the China Studies Program that also can fulfill a requirement for the International Policy Program).<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.735.  China's National Security Perspectives.  4 Credits.  

Along with China's emergence as a great power, Communist Party leaders in Beijing face a wide range of traditional and non-traditional security challenges. This course examines Chinese perspectives on, and responses to, contemporary national security issues such as North Korea's nuclear program, proliferation more generally, Taiwan and cross-Strait relations, energy security and sea lane protection, space and cyberspace security, and U.S. "rebalancing" to the Asia-Pacific region. Also considered will be security-related budget issues, as well as the responses of others to its rise in such areas as export control policy.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.739.  The Chinese People's Liberation Army and China's Search for Military Power and Security, 1949-Present.  4 Credits.  

This course is designed to provide an overview of the development of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) from the establishment of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) in 1949 to the present, and to enable students to analyze Chinese military capabilities, evaluate the ongoing modernization of the PLA, and assess the implications for regional and global security. The course will build a framework for analyzing Chinese military and security developments by focusing on a number of theoretical and practical issues, including issues such as the problems of assessing foreign military transformation in peacetime; the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to assessing the capabilities of the PLA (such as by tracking progress in PLA capabilities over time, comparing contemporary PLA capabilities with those of the U.S. military, and evaluating the PLA’s ability to perform its missions); key events in the history of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), primarily since the establishment of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) in 1949; modernization of China’s military hardware including conventional ground, air, and naval forces, nuclear and conventional missile forces, and space and counter-space capabilities;and the implications of China’s expanding national security interests for the future missions and capabilities of the Chinese military.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.660.734[C]

SA.750.740.  China's Political Economy in Transition.  4 Credits.  

This course examines the political and institutional foundations sustaining contemporary China’s economic growth and reforms, as well as the consequences of its transition. The course focuses on several paradoxical aspects. How does China push for market-oriented reforms without democratizing the authoritarian political system? Is the state still in control in today’s economy? How does China reconcile the communist party ideology with its fast-growing private sector, and with elements of capitalism? How does the state balance the centralization and decentralization of economic policy making and implementation? What are the interest groups and strategies behind China’s selective embrace of globalization, and how did foreign investment and trade influence domestic politics and policies? What are the challenges for sustaining the “China model?” These important questions will be examined through a combination of conceptual frameworks, case studies, and policy analysis. The course aims to develop students’ abilities to understand and critically analyze the evolving policies, government-business relations, and state-society relations in Chinese political economy. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.741.  China's Development and Increasing Global Engagement.  4 Credits.  

The purpose of this course would be to examine China's opening to and engagement with the rest of the world starting in the early 1980s, and to explore likely future developments. China's opening, which was initiated by landmark reforms introduced in 1979, has gone through two stages and is now in a third. The course would start with the initial stage lasting over a decade during which China sought foreign direct investment and overseas contacts to initiate and support the modernization of its industrial economy. The success of this first round, led in the early 1990s, to intensifying industrialization and increasing reliance on trade and FDI to promote growth and structural change. This part of the course would analyze trade and exchange rate policies, measures taken to incentivize foreign investment, and parallel efforts to enhance the competitiveness of state owned enterprises. It would also discuss how China's engagement with international institutions including the WTO, contributed to the reform process. The third stage of China's opening began gathering momentum around the time of the financial crisis - 2007-2009. It remains work in progress and the course would review how it is unfolding. This stage involves a more proactive engagement with the Asian region and beyond, with China playing a larger role on the world stage via foreign investment, development assistance, internationalization of the RMB, ambitious infrastructure building projects (Silk Roads) to link China with other economies, the creation of financial institutions and signing of treaties to tighten China's linkages with others, and the overseas projection of its military power. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.742.  China's Economy: Reforms, Performance, and Challenges.  4 Credits.  

By some measures, China now has the world’s largest economy. By any measure, China has contributed more to global economic growth over the past decade than any other country. Yet recent and ongoing developments have led to considerable pessimism regarding China’s ability to transition to a high income economy. How can we explain China’s rapid growth over the past four decades? Is this recent pessimism justified, and, if so, what must China do to avoid getting stuck in a middle income trap? Focusing on these questions, this course aims to help students develop a deeper understanding of the Chinese economy.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.743.  China's Evolving Financial System.  4 Credits.  

This course focuses on the post 1980 deepening and diversification of China’s financial system, the establishing of regulatory institutions and the integration with global finance. Topics covered include the spread of shadow banking, capital account opening, internationalization of the RMB, and cross-border lending for developmental and market integration purposes by China’s development banks and through multilateral institutions. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.744.  China's Growing Global Economic Influence.  4 Credits.  

China has come to play an increasingly influential role in global trade, finance, and economic governance. This course will analyze China’s global economic influence through an analysis of issue areas (supply chains, regional integration, currency internationalization), global initiatives (OBOR, AIIB), and regional impacts. In addition to describing China’s role in the global economy, the course will also focus on the domestic economic pressures that have influenced China’s global behavior and the costs/benefits to China’s domestic economy from its increasing global exposure.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.745.  Social Origins of Authoritarianism and Democracy in Greater China.  4 Credits.  

This course follows the spirits of Barrington Moore’s Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy to compare the development of civil society, contentious politics, and elite conflicts in mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong/Macau since the end of WWII, with an emphasis on the social base, trajectories, and successes/failures of democratization attempts. The course will also cover the growing literature on the question of authoritarian resilience in mainland China, as well as its implications to the wider geopolitical dynamics of the Indo-Pacific.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.746.  China as an Emerging Superpower.  4 Credits.  
SA.750.747.  China and the Earth's Final Frontiers: Politics, Strategy and Environment.  4 Credits.  

This course explores the political, security, and environmental dimensions of China’s impact on the earth’s "final frontiers"—Antarctica, the atmosphere, the high seas, and outer space. How do these special planetary spaces known as “global commons”— outside the sovereign control of any state and therefore in principle accessible to all—factor into China’s vision for its political and economic rise on the world stage? How is China’s influence affecting the global regimes established to govern these global commons? What is China’s relationship to the changing environmental conditions in these vast but vulnerable areas? How do China’s interactions compare to those of other emerging powers, and what does China’s global influence mean for the future of these remaining planetary frontiers?<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.750.748.  Social and Political History of Modern China.  4 Credits.  

This class traces the footsteps of China’s struggle to transform itself from a multi-ethnic empire to a modern nation state. Many challenges that China is facing today, such as demographic pressure, social dislocation under rapid marketization, incorporation and governance of large non-Han areas, government finance with a huge centralizing bureaucracy, and encounters with capitalist powers from the West, originated in the seventeenth and eighteenth century. This class will examine the social and political processes in the late nineteenth through the twentieth century in this longer historical context. Topics covered will include legacies of the Qing empire, Sinocentric tributary system and Western imperialism, nationalist and communist revolutions, China in World Wars, socialist development under Mao, “socialist market economy” since Deng, competing reconstructions of Confucianism, and contentious historiographies about China’s past.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>