SA.840.705.  The Political Economy of Federalism in North America and Europe.  4 Credits.  

Citizens of countries in North America and Europe govern themselves with multiple, overlapping layers of governmental institutions that in practice compete for support, whether that support is expressed in the form of tolerance of taxation, compliance with regulation, or legitimacy. Constitutions in turn govern the formal relationships among competing institutions, but these rules of the game form only the parameters of public policy responsibility and authority. This course is designed to examine the structure and performance of intergovernmental policy competition in North America (where Canada, Mexico and the United States are all constitutional federations, and supranational institutions are few and relatively weak) and Europe (where several countries are federations to varying degrees, and the supranational institutions of the European Union are relatively sophisticated). The methodological approach used in the course will be comparative international political economy, drawing on historical and contemporary materials and emphasizing attention to primary source documents. (This is a cross-listed course offered by the Canadian Studies Program that also can fulfill a requirement for the Latin American Studies Program.)<a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/resources/administrative-offices/how-access-course-syllabi-and-evaluations" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.840.706.  Middle Power Diplomacy.  4 Credits.  

International relations scholarship pays close attention to the Great Powers, and concern over failed states. With the formation of the G20, there is a multilateral forum where Great Powers and the Rising Powers of Brazil, Russia, India, and China can shape the global agenda. Yet in every era and every stable international order there is an important role for Middle Powers – countries whose capacity to foster or disrupt order leads them to “punch above their weight” in international relations. Canada self-identifies as a Middle Power, but today the status of Middle Power is claimed by states in every region and on every continent.This course considers the dilemmas and strategies of Middle Power diplomacy, and how the United States, Great Powers and Small States interact with them. Over the course of the semester, we will consider what role Middle Powers play in the contemporary international system, and what to do about it. (This is a cross-listed course offered by the Canadian Studies Program that also can fulfill a requirement for the Latin American Studies Program.)<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.840.710.  North American Climate Policy in a Warming World.  4 Credits.  

Within the past decade, North America has commenced a path towards a global energy super-power, expanding known Canadian oil reserves to include the huge shale deposits that sparked the recent boom in the United States. At the same time, the continent has seen shifts towards clean power and renewable energy with the goal of reducing impacts of climate change. Climate policies span a large spectrum of measures that include reducing emissions, adaptation to new climates, and geoengineering the planet’s climate trajectory. This course will focus specifically on how policy in North America has – and sometimes has not – addressed the climate challenge. The driving forces and political palatability of decision-making related to climate will be discussed as well as the subsequent policies that are applied in North America. Classroom sessions will include active learning through classroom exercises, structured student debates, engaging discussion on course materials, and guest lectures. Students will learn to undertake research and participate in dialogue that evaluates and critically assesses climate policy in the countries in question, which will have broader comparative applicability in future work. <a href="https://jh.box.com/s/eatlmnt6fi35rg0rwf4cb4mrdcem8oza" target="_blank">Click here to see a video introduction for the course.</a> <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.840.712.  Dynamics of Commodity Economies.  4 Credits.  

Examines the pluses and minuses of small open economies that are commodity exporters, with the Canadian case study as the pivotal focus. Uses developing and other developed commodity exporters to contrast and compare. (This is a cross-listed course offered by the Canadian Studies Program that also can fulfill a requirement for the Latin American Studies Program.)<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.840.715.  Economics Of Immigration.  4 Credits.  

Examines the economic causes and consequences of international migration. The central focus is an economic analysis of the general patterns of population flows, their determinants and their impact. Analyzes these primarily within the context of the North American experience, although also considers other case studies. Includes consideration of the Canadian experience, in that Canada is both a significant receiving and sending country. Prerequisite: Microeconomics or Accelerated Microeconomics. (This is a cross-listed course offered by the Canadian Studies Program that also can fulfill a requirement for the International Economics Program and the Latin American Studies Program.) <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.840.714[C].

SA.840.718.  Policy Consulting Practicum.  4 Credits.  

This course gives students the chance to work as a team on a consulting project for a public sector client. An MOU serves as the consulting contract, and the client provides research questions, a point of contact, and access to government professionals and subject matter experts as well as contacts in the private sector to facilitate research. The client and policy topic changes every year, contact the instructor for details.<a href="http://bit.ly/2hZ0reR" target="_blank">Click here to see a video introduction for the course.</a><a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.840.734.  Navigating North America 2.0.  4 Credits.  

The United States Mexico Canada Agreement (USMCA) replaced NAFTA after 25 years. This course will engage with a detailed examination of the text and spirit of the USMCA and how it will affect political and economic relations among the three countries before considering the next steps necessary to create and govern a single continental market in North America.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.840.780.  Advanced Seminar: Arctic Imperatives.  2 Credits.  

The Arctic has reached an inflection point. Technology permits affordable resource extraction, and enables greater access to this remote region than was possible even a decade ago. As a result, several new dynamics have emerged in the international relations concerning the Arctic. Scientific study is revealing more about the Arctic ecosystem and its relation to global climate. Economic and Great Power competition is altering the calculus of Arctic and non-Arctic states, from North America to Europe and Eurasia – even China, Japan and the United Kingdom have asserted themselves in Arctic debates. As the Arctic becomes less remote, psychologically and geopolitically, past indifference is being replaced with new interests and imperatives. Yet the institutional arrangements governing the Arctic, from intrastate structures to give the region’s residents, especially aboriginal peoples, effective participation in decision making to nascent institutions such as the Arctic Council, are struggling to adapt to these changes. Exogenous shifts, such as to global energy prices, can marginalize or essentialize the Arctic quite suddenly with unsettling repercussions for residents and the international system alike. This two-credit advanced seminar will unpack the inherent complexities of the Arctic region and explore how governments are addressing its potential domestically, cooperatively and in in competition or conflict.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.840.781.  Advanced Seminar: Canada – Managing Intervulnerability.  2 Credits.  

In 1984, the growing integration of the United States and Canada economically and socially was creating net benefits for both countries, but also increasing intervulnerability for both with critical policy consequences. What once could be considered a domestic issue would come to have cross border consequences and policies that were effective, but would be undermined by leakage and spillover effects. Canadians, one tenth the U.S. population and an economy reliant upon the U.S. economy, negotiate a political, economic and cultural equilibrium that has sustained Canada’s independence in domestic and foreign affairs, and fostered a bilingual, multicultural and markedly more socially egalitarian society. This two-credit advanced seminar will unpack the complexities of Canada and explore its potential as a harbinger of globalization’s challenges and opportunities, the possibilities and limits on Canada’s experience as a model for other countries coping with interdependence, and consider what Canada today reveals about the state and future trajectory of a U.S.-led world order.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>