SA.755.704.  Current Asian Security Issues.  4 Credits.  

In this course students will gain an appreciation for the breadth and depth of security problems facing Asia-Pacific states and peoples, and develop skills in analyzing and explaining traditional and non-traditional concepts of security. The course will examine internal, transnational and regional security issues, and investigate potential areas of conflict in South, Southeast and East Asia. A key objective of the course is to develop an understanding of how different Asian states construe the meaning of “security,” why states and non-state actors behave the way they do in the security realm, and how they anticipate – correctly or otherwise -- the consequences of their actions. The course also provides an opportunity to build professional writing skills.<a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/resources/administrative-offices/how-access-course-syllabi-and-evaluations" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.710.  Asian Energy Security.  4 Credits.  

This course surveys the distinctive character of Asian energy security requirements – how they are changing over time, what political-economic forces are driving their transformations, and what those requirements imply for broader economic and political-military relationships between Asia and the world. It gives special attention to Asia’s energy dependence on the Middle East and the extent to which Russia and alternative sources, including nuclear power, provide a feasible and acceptable alternative. Cross-national comparisons among the energy security policies of China, India, Japan, Korea, and Western paradigms are used to explore distinctive features of Asian approaches to energy security. (This is a cross-listed course offered by the Asian Studies Program that also can fulfill a requirement for the Japan Studies and Energy, Resources & Environment programs.) <a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/resources/administrative-offices/how-access-course-syllabi-and-evaluations" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.712.  Covert Action & Foreign Policy in Asia.  4 Credits.  

Examines covert action as an instrument of national security policy in Asia by analyzing case studies of foreign intervention in Asian countries from the Cold War to the “global war on terrorism.” Reviews the principles, means and techniques of covert action and explores the considerations involved in decisions to employ this instrument. Cases include Afghanistan, China, India, Indonesia, Iran, Laos, the Philippines and Vietnam. Provides experience in preparation of a presidential finding and construction of an operational plan. (This is a cross-listed course offered by the Asian Studies Program that also can fulfill a requirement for the Strategic Studies Program.) Limited to 20 students.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.719.  Central Asia: The Pivot of All Eurasia.  4 Credits.  

Explores the geography, resources, societies, political systems and economies of the newly independent states of Central Asia, including Afghanistan. Devotes special attention to the role of Islam, security issues, the Russian diaspora, generational change and the climate for foreign investment. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.880.772[C]

SA.755.720.  Asia in International Finance.  4 Credits.  

Examines the evolution of the financial systems of Japan and China from 1980 to the present, including structure, regulation, and functioning of these markets in domestic, regional and international contexts. National context includes an in depth review of the structure and operation of the financial markets of Japan and China, including: the key participants, the governmental and regulatory institutions that supervise them, various financial crises in each country with a focus on causes and solutions, reforms over time with a particular focus on liberalization of the financial system and related issues such as corporate governance and legal and accounting issues, the fiscal/monetary processes and policies in each country that affect the financial system, and the historical, political and social factors that affect institutions and policy. Regional context includes the Asian Financial Crisis, the structural causes, the roles of Japan and China, the IMF response and the various proposals to create regional solutions to future crises; roles of regional financial institutions (ADB, AIIB); China’s Belt and Road Initiative and the degree/desirability of financial integration in Asia. The international perspective focuses on the geopolitical/geo-economic implications of the structure and regulation of financial markets. Current events/topics in finance relevant to the course are covered and students are encouraged to propose such topics for discussion. Taught by a SAIS alumnus with 30 years of investment banking and private equity experience in Asia and the US. Students wishing to take the class but lacking the prerequisites should email Professor Talarico at gtalari1@jhu.edu for permission to enroll.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): Students may not register for this class if they have already received credit for SA.760.742[C];SA.300.701[C] OR SA.300.706[C] OR SA.310.701[C] OR SA.300.708[C] OR SA.300.852[C] OR SA.310.719[C] OR SA.380.722[C] OR SA.380.760[C]

SA.755.722.  Political Economy and Development Strategies in East Asia.  4 Credits.  

This course examines and compares development strategies in East Asia. The course begins with a section investigating the individual cases of China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and Singapore, with emphasis given to government-business relations, institutions, and policies that influence their development strategies. The second section engages students in a cross-regional perspective by comparing these cases, with special attention to why certain development strategies work in some political and economic contexts but not others. The third section examines how globalization influences development strategies and the distinctive roles of these East Asian economies in global production. It also discusses the roles of international organizations and networks of trade and investment. The course aims to facilitate understanding of the development policies in East Asia both in terms of specific contexts and in a comparative perspective.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.724.  Maritime Asia.  4 Credits.  

This is a new course designed to study Asia from a different perspective. Typically, scholars look at the internal and external dynamics of Asian politics, economy and security from land, with the state as the center of inquiry. This course, developed with the advice and assistance of RADM (Ret.) Michael McDevitt, Senior Fellow at the Center for Naval Analysis, examines Asia from the vantage point of the surrounding seas. The role of the state is important, but maritime geography is the center of inquiry in this course. The rapid growth of seaborne international trade, discovery of undersea mineral resources and increasing value of depleted fish stocks, and emergence of territorial disputes involving maritime spaces has raised the strategic importance of the world’s oceans and seas. More than half the world’s maritime area is located in Asia. The course will:• Provide an introduction to “maritime geography”; • Describe and compare the political, economic and security interests of the stakeholders in the major maritime areas of Asia: Sea of Japan, East China and Yellow Seas, South China Sea, Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea; • Appraise the policies of each stakeholder, including the U.S., in protecting and enhancing interests in Asia maritime areas; and • Examine the key issues involved with each of the five potential Asia maritime flashpoints that could lead to armed conflict.• Conclude with an in-class exercise and discussion of the Trump administration’s prospective plans and policy in Maritime Asia.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.725.  The Emerging Geo-Economics of Eurasia.  4 Credits.  

This course explores rising twenty-first century political-economic interdependence across the Eurasian continent—including the European Union, Russia, and the Middle East, and India, as well as Northeast Asia— and the implications for global affairs. It includes extensive use of maps and consideration of when and how geography and geopolitics make a difference to both commercial and diplomatic transactions. Extensive use of case studies and practical examples, drawn particularly from the transportation, energy, and financial sectors, directed toward the examination of both political risk and economic opportunity.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.726.  Washington, Beijing, and Beyond: Global Cities in World Affairs.  4 Credits.  

This course considers the role of major global cities, as opposed to national governments, in shaping the course of twenty-first century international affairs. Attention is given first to how city governments, such as those of New York City, London, Seoul, and Tokyo, together with collaborative bodies like C-40, act to set global agendas and concretely address world problems ranging from human security to transportation, energy efficiency, and environmental protection. Consideration is also given to how non-governmental policy communities in centers like Washington, D.C.; Brussels; and Shanghai work to influence global affairs. Particular attention is given to the role that think tanks, mass media, and universities play in these global centers, as the Information Revolution leverages the practical role of individual policy entrepreneurs.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.727.  The Singapore Model and its Global Implication.  2 Credits.  

Despite its limited population and resources, Singapore plays a role in world affairs far beyond its physical size. This course explores the Lion City’s role in ASEAN; the economic development of China and India; inside the Washington, D.C. Beltway: and as a global laboratory for ideas ranging from the future of the welfare state to Internet of Things. Special attention is given to Singapore policy innovations in energy, transportation, welfare, immigration, finance, and environmental protection, including an assessment of their global impact.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.728.  China's Belt and Road Initiative: The Transformation of Asia and Global Implications.  2 Credits.  

This course examines China's recent “Belt and Road Initiative” in the broader context of policy efforts across the centuries to establish positive trans-continental relations among Northeast Asia, Europe, and intervening nations. It considers in detail transformational developments in energy demand, logistics, geopolitics, and global finance imparting momentum to BRI, while surveying concretely how BRI has evolved since its initiation in the fall of 2013. Attention is also given to the domestic politics of BRI in both China and host nations, as well as the global implications of this major Chinese foreign-policy initiative. The course concludes with an assessment of the global political-economic implications of the BRI initiative.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.729.  U.S. Security Policy in the Asia-Pacific.  4 Credits.  

Nowhere does the United States face greater long-term security and defense challenges than in Asia. This course, combining a thematic approach with weekly case studies, provides a rigorous examination of key security issues across the Indo-Pacific — from Pakistan to Japan — and their implications for U.S. interests and policy planning. Topics include the evolving Asian security order; defense challenges posed by the rise of China; trends in conventional military modernization; implications of the Sino-Indian rivalry on regional stability; emerging dynamics in Asian nuclear deterrence; and trends in security competition in the maritime, space and cyber domains. This course includes a practical focus on policy writing.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.730.  Asian Geopolitics and Political Economy.  4 Credits.  

Introduction to the political geography of the world’s most rapidly growing region, and how Asia’s global role is being transformed by economic expansion. Particular emphasis on inter-relationships among Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, and South Asia, in the context of China’s rise, as well as on strategic sea lanes that interconnect the nations of Asia. Includes comparative attention to domestic factors bearing on economic growth and foreign-policy patterns of Asian nations, including demography, governmental structure, and interest-group behavior.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.731.  East Asian Security.  4 Credits.  
SA.755.732.  Asian Maritime Interests and Strategies.  4 Credits.  

This course will explore maritime issues in Asia, focusing on the maritime interests and maritime strategies of a number of countries, including China, Japan, Australia, the United States, India, Vietnam, and the Philippines, among others. It will begin with an overview of maritime issues in Asia and explore evolving views on maritime interests in several countries and the development of maritime strategies and capabilities intended to address those interests. The course will also include an assessment of different countries' approaches to the security, economic, diplomatic and legal aspects of maritime disputes. The course will cover maritime territorial disputes in the East China Sea, where China claims the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands, which are administered by Japan, and in the South China Sea, where China’s claims conflict with those of a number of rivals. This will include assessments of the key actors involved. With respect to China, for example, the key actors include China’s navy, coast guard, and maritime militia as well as select state-owned enterprises. The course will also consider Taiwan’s role in the maritime disputes. In addition, it will explore other maritime issues of importance to countries in Asia, such as anti-piracy operations, fisheries issues, and energy security concerns.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.734.  The Rise of India and China.  4 Credits.  

This course will provide broad comparisons of the two emerging Asian giants in terms of their political history, current political systems, systems of governance, demographic characteristics, approach to economic reform, performance in economic development, domestic social- and infrastructure development, bilateral and international relations, strategic interests, impact on the regional and global economy. The course will be taught by two instructors, an India and a China expert.Course registration requires departmental approval because there is an accompanying one-week study trip on the same topic in mid-January. Register for the course as you normally would, and the South Asia department will follow up with you regarding an application and other relevant issues. If you have any questions please contact southasia@jhu.edu.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.735.  Political Risk in Asia.  4 Credits.  

Policymakers and investors increasingly recognize that both political dynamics and economic fundamentals matter to economic performance and investment returns. This course will introduce students to different frameworks and methodologies for the analysis of political economic risk in fast-changing Asia. It will build a solid theoretical foundation for political economic risk analysis and applying these skills to analyze real-world problems found across several industries in Asian countries. Students will learn to identify the transmission channels by which the realization of political risk in one arena influences outcomes in other, distant, and seemingly unrelated arenas. Upon completion, students will be able to evaluate the political economic risk exposure of different industries in Asian, systematically analyze the risk transmission mechanisms of various political risk events and shocks, rationally weigh the potential outcomes according to selected measurement criteria, and efficiently communicate to decision-makers about the associated implications and opportunities. Students will practice how to make concise and compelling arguments in writing and, presentations, and data visualization to powerfully communicate their arguments.Political economic risk analysis will be explored both at the macro/country level andmicro/industry level. The assigned readings include a set of classic qualitative literature and several quantitative research papers and case studies. Case studies will emphasize the identification of specific transmission channels of political economic risk in different industries within Asian. Several cases may require some prior knowledge of economic models and basic financial terminology. Students will investigate how data and statistics can be misleading and why forecasts and risk management often fail.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.736.  The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation in East Asia.  4 Credits.  

The course is structured around the background, theory, and application of nuclear politics and history in East Asia. In the first portion of the course students learn about the development of nuclear weapons programs during the Second World War and the Cold War and the differences in proliferation and non-proliferation strategies among early proliferators (e.g. the United States and the Soviet Union). During this portion of the course, students will examine important incidents and policy decisions that shaped nuclear proliferation in world politics. In the second portion of the course, students will learn broader theoretical concepts in International Relations scholarship such as brinkmanship diplomacy, deterrence theory, and alliance security dilemma, and apply them to the study of cases of proliferation, attempted proliferation, and nuclear latency in East Asian countries, including China, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, Japan and Australia in order to understand the variance in nuclear exploration, pursuit, and acquisition. The course draws upon canonical texts in the nuclear politics and history literature, and also incorporates recent policy analysis. This course relies on declassified archival documents to illustrate the history and theories addressed in the class, thus fostering a breadth of knowledge on different nuclear weapons cases. While we analyze these cases, I encourage students to engage with primary source documents as well as to think critically and evaluate the arguments put forward by historians and political scientists on nuclear proliferation and non-proliferation.

SA.755.737.  Is this Century Asian? Economic Development Drivers and Constraints in Emerging Asia.  4 Credits.  

This course will focus on the recent development performance of the major emerging economies of Asia and the contemporary challenges they face while also examining common issues that cut across borders. After a cursory look at economic history to explain the current economic circumstances of each country, the focus will move quickly to how these economies operate today, the interaction between the state and the market, the key development constraints that threaten future progress, and the state of policy coordination within the region as a whole and the delivery of regional public goods. For the purposes of this course, “Emerging Asia” will consist of China, Southeast Asia, and India. These economies span a very wide range of levels of development, economic structure, historical experience, and government policies. The course will touch upon, but not examine in detail, the advanced economies of Northeast Asia (Japan, Korea, and Taiwan), emerging South Asia (Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Bhutan) and emerging Central Asia. Aside from the prerequisites of micro- and macroeconomics and international trade, lectures and discussions will assume an understanding of key economic concepts, models, and theories, and will require knowledge of some statistical methods, national economic accounts (fiscal, monetary, and balance of payments), and development economics.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

Prerequisite(s): SA.300.701[C] OR SA.300.706[C] OR SA.310.701[C]

SA.755.738.  Nuclear Proliferation in Asia: Politics and History.  4 Credits.  

The course is structured around the background, theory, and application of nuclear politics and history in East Asia. In the first portion of the course students learn about the development of nuclear weapons programs during the Second World War and the Cold War and the differences in proliferation and non-proliferation strategies among early proliferators (e.g. the United States and the Soviet Union). During this portion of the course, students will examine important incidents and policy decisions that shaped nuclear proliferation in world politics. In the second portion of the course, students will learn broader theoretical concepts in International Relations scholarship such as brinkmanship diplomacy, deterrence theory, and alliance security dilemma, and apply them to the study of cases of proliferation, attempted proliferation, and nuclear latency in East Asian countries, including China, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, Japan and Australia in order to understand the variance in nuclear exploration, pursuit, and acquisition. The course draws upon canonical texts in the nuclear politics and history literature, and also incorporates recent policy analysis. This course relies on declassified archival documents to illustrate the history and theories addressed in the class, thus fostering a breadth of knowledge on different nuclear weapons cases. While we analyze these cases, I encourage students to engage with primary source documents as well as to think critically and evaluate the arguments put forward by historians and political scientists on nuclear proliferation and non-proliferation. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.755.752.  The Construction of Northeast Asia: Japan, China, and Eurasian Continental Integration.  4 Credits.  

This course will examine how Japan and China are responding to the new Northeast Asian regional frameworks for cooperation in transportation construction, logistics, peace and security to satisfy growing energy demands, promote economic and trade, and bring stability to the Korean peninsula. Its focus will be an examination of the regional integration pressure on Japan, China, the Koreas, Russia and Mongolia to respond to rising “continentalism” within a reconfiguration of a ‘New Silk Road.’ Regional development scenarios coming from the UNDP (Greater Tumen Initiative), South Korea (Eurasia Initiative and Silk Road Express), and Mongolia (Transit Corridor) will be reviewed within the context of longstanding historical and Cold War-legacy antagonisms as well as resource nationalism that have impeded full economic cooperation, caused organizational gaps, and hindered the investment necessary to modernize rail, road, and pipe infrastructure. Attention also will be paid to the nuclear and national security challenges faced by the U.S. and countries in the region which weigh against investment and free trade incentives particularly for Japanese and Korean companies. Course materials will include financial and economic blogs as well as contemporary foreign policy analysis.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>