SA.780.622.  Political Development of North Africa.  4 Credits.  

This course will study the development of Northern African polities, both as “living models” of different types of political evolution and as cases of particular political phenomena. It is designed to give the student not only a basic understanding of the historical and political evolution of the regimes, institutions and communities of Algeria, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia since independence, but also to explore in depth certain themes such as the relationship between state and society in the Maghreb; the evolution of modern and traditional authoritarian leadership; Nationalism and National Identity construction; Islamic radicalism and the articulation of opposition. The course will also address the cultural, social and economic problems each state faces in its attempt to modernize and the debate on modernization, regional integration and globalization.<a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/resources/administrative-offices/how-access-course-syllabi-and-evaluations" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.648.  Political Economy of African Development.  4 Credits.  

Examines the political context of Africa’s post-colonial development. Considers the historical evolution of African economies from the colonial era, and the structural and institutional features of economic development since independence. Reviews the evolution of economic policy and the nature of political regimes. Considers the incentives of political and economic elites and popular constituencies. Examines the genesis of economic crisis and attempted reform.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.652.  Africa as an Emerging Market.  4 Credits.  

In 2012, six African nations were among the ten fastest growing economies in the world, and the region is expected to grow on average five percent. Africa is an increasingly important market in the global economy -- presenting new and growing trade and investment opportunities for business from around the globe -- including the US, Europe, China, India, Brazil, and many others. The region has also become a rapidly growing destination for foreign direct invest (FDI), with nearly $80 billion a year in private investment flows which substantially exceeds foreign aid, and the highest rate of return on FDI of any developing region. Beyond the natural resource and primary commodities exports that have fueled African economic growth historically, Africa's growth is currently more widespread across sectors including wholesale and retail trade, transportation, telecom, and manufacturing. This course will examine factually what is happening in Africa that is capturing the attention of policymakers, businesses, and prompting numerous studies and reports on Africa as an emerging market in the global economy. It will also explore and discuss policy options for governments and companies regarding future engagement with the nations of Africa.<a href="http://www.sais-jhu.edu/resources/administrative-offices/how-access-course-syllabi-and-evaluations" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.713.  Energy, Politics and Development in Africa.  4 Credits.  

This course focuses on the political and economic challenges associated with resource wealth in SSA with particular attention paid to petroleum. Course topics include debate over the resource curse, conflict, corruption, a taxonomy of oil country regimes, taxation and revenue management, state enterprises and other key players. The course profiles a number of individual oil-rich SSA countries.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.718.  Promoting Development in Fragile States.  4 Credits.  

Hindered by weak institutions, social divisions, and difficult historical legacies, fragile states face fundamentally different challenges than other countries. This course focuses on understanding the drivers of state fragility and what steps might counteract these. It encourages participants to think deeply about the nature of development, political incentives, the role of geography in governance, social identities, the nature of public authority, and a variety of other issues relevant to state building in difficult circumstances. It will be of interest to students working on African and Middle Eastern issues, conflict management, comparative politics, and economic/political development.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.724.  Contemporary African Politics.  4 Credits.  

A conceptual and historical overview of politics in Sub-Saharan Africa since independence. Considers the social basis of politics, the nature of political actors and the institutional context. Examines major tendencies in political thought and ideology. Reviews regime types and strategies of rule. Analyzes central themes and processes in African politics, including clientelism, ethnicity, authoritarianism and democracy. Discusses important cases and trends.<a href="http://legacy2.sais-jhu.edu/courses/african_studies.html#AS780724" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.734.  Conflict and the African Great Lakes.  4 Credits.  

Africa’s Great Lakes region has become synonymous with conflict. Over the last fivedecades, this region has seen genocides, ethnic violence, land disputes, civil war, cross borderconflict and a multi-national war. Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda and the DemocraticRepublic of Congo have been affected by one or many of these destabilizing factors. Thecourse introduces students to the main issues affecting peace, stability and developmentin the Great Lakes.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.735.  Making US Policy in Africa: Strategy, Tools, and Tactics.  4 Credits.  

Making US Policy in Africa examines the interagency US policymaking process guiding the implementation of African strategic policy by focusing on concrete case studies and interviews with guest speakers from key agencies. It begins with an overview summarizing the evolution of American policy process as it applies to Africa. Subsequent classes assess the strategies, tools, and tactics deployed by agencies to achieve policy objectives in the areas of security, humanitarian crises response, and economic development. By studying case studies and interacting with guest speakers, students gain practical insights into how government institutions formulate and implement US policy in Africa. Institutions include the Departments of State, Defense, and Energy; USAID; Office of the US Trade Representative; and Congress. Evaluation of student performance is based on class participation, formal presentations, and three short professional policy memos analyzing US African policy. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.736.  Pivotal States in Africa: South Africa, Nigeria, Ethiopia and Kenya.  4 Credits.  

This course analyzes politics, society and economic development strategies of the four most important states in sub-Saharan Africa: South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya and Ethiopia. Beginning with an overview of each country, we will profile social and economic foundations, including ethnic and religious patterns and the legacy of colonial rule. A succeeding class examines processes of state formation, changing institutions and the evolution of political regimes, including dominant coalitions. A third class for each country focuses on economic development, including structural features, key strategies and patterns of structural change and investment. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.737.  The Politics of Business in Sub-Saharan Africa.  4 Credits.  

From the anarchic capitalism of failed states to the protectionist policies of ‘developmental’ regimes, no other world region provides local entrepreneurs with starker contrasts than Sub-Saharan Africa. This course offers an introduction to the political economy of enterprise and entrepreneurship on the African continent. Its goal is to equip students with the tools necessary to analyze the reciprocal relationship of business and politics in Africa – how different kinds of economic activity both facilitate and are facilitated by certain forms of political organization – while enabling students to apply these concepts to practical problems in the areas of commerce, development, and diplomacy. The course will blend a review of the ‘grand theories’ of African political economy – (neo)liberalism, (neo)patrimonialism, and ‘developmental’ perspectives – with detailed case studies of specific industries, firms, and regulatory frameworks. For maximum relevance, lectures and class discussion will be supplemented by conversations with practitioners from DC-based risk and investment firms, think tanks, and business associations.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.738.  Africa's Security Challenges: the Military, Governance and Insurgencies.  4 Credits.  

Africa’s Security Challenges introduces students to Africa’s current and emerging security threats, and identifies and examines ways to resolve these challenges in a holistic manner so as to sustain security, stability and development. The course provides: (1) An overview of the sociopolitical and historical security landscapes of Africa; (2) A critical examination of the drivers of insecurity in Africa, an analysis of governance practices and assessment of contested democratic transitions and violence; (3) An analysis of the role that the mismanagement of resources, foreign actors and international cooperation have played in maintaining, perpetrating or changing the security dynamics and trends. We take a closer look at Western engagement and regional cooperation in the fight against extremist groups such as Boko Haram and Al-Shabaab, and how their policies impact regional peace and development. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.739.  Ethnicity, Identity and Politics in Africa.  4 Credits.  

This course is an examination of the social basis of politics, with a focus on ethnicity and the central role it plays in politics in Africa. We will pay particular attention to how ethnicity interacts with other social cleavages like religion, class, and gender to shape the construction of political identities, and how these, in turn, implicate political processes and outcomes in Africa South of the Sahara. We will examine the historical sources of ethnicity, its effects on state building, democratization, patterns of competition and conflict in contemporary Africa.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.740.  Democracy, Political Reform and Civil Society in Africa.  4 Credits.  

This course analyzes the democratization of politics in African states by focusing on the relationship of civil society groups to political elites and formal political institutions. After reviewing independence movements, the course concentrates on the revival of democratic governance from the mid-nineties to the present. Students will assess if and how political parties, international donors, and indigenous civil society groups contribute to increasing accountability and good governance. Classes will include case studies and interviews with international and African actors engaged in the practical work of democratic reform in Africa. <a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>

SA.780.760.  The Challenge of Insurgencies for African States.  2 Credits.  

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SA.780.761.  Gender Politics in Africa.  2 Credits.  

The course focuses on how gender—the social construction of femininity and masculinity—shapes development policy and how these exacerbate gender inequality and women’s continued subordination in Africa, with an emphasis on education, health, political participation, and development aid. We will examine some of the most pressing issues facing women in contemporary Africa under these broad policy agendas, including poverty, conflict and violence, HIV/AIDS, female genital cutting, and so on. We will open with theoretical perspectives on gender and engage the debates on African feminisms. Next, we will survey historical continuities and discontinuities of colonialism on the gendered dynamics of social structures and institutions. The rest of the course will then engage specific policies, their developmental/underdevelopment implications for women using case studies from the different regions, and the evolving paradigms of gender-development for women on the continent.<a href="http://bit.ly/1bebp5s" target="_blank">Click here to see evaluations, syllabi, and faculty bios</a>